Ski-Doo Snowmobiles Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Windsurfnut
Joined
·
1,237 Posts
Working on my 2014 XRS suspension set up and have some questions for the shock/setup guru's out there.

My XRS really likes to high side in the corners, or lift inside ski high and ride out the corner on the outside ski. I don't suffer from any push in soft/slippery conditions, but I do when conditions are tight/stiff and the track wants to push the front end through, and usually wants to high side.

Here's my main question. It seems my sled wants to roll up on the outside ski in the corners instead of staying flat. If I add alot of rebound it helps, but I feel I'm running way more rebound then I should run. Usually this is about 4 clicks out from full in.

There are alot of members here that talk about reducing front shock preload past where the clip is supposed to stop the ring. If I do this, the roll is worse and requires a alot more compression to control the pitching of the sled.

If I increase preload the front end tightens up and roll is reduced, but starts to stiffen up the front end a bit too much.

So..how much preload should the front end of these sleds really have. Opposite to what most members are doing of reducing preload, I find more stability in increasing preload. I'm not adding much in addition to where the clip is. Maybe 3mm

In your opinions, on the XRS, should I be tuning of slightly more preload or more the high levels of compression and rebound. It would be nice if Doo had some markings on the threaded adjuster to help us compare and gauge settings on the front and center shocks. I just find it hard to believe had that clip but in a place where you need to reduce preload further.

I'm 160 lbs, running the stock 1.25" ripsaw with 84 studs, and the Pilot 5.7R skis.

I typically find my settings at:

Front:

12-14 clicks in from full soft on compression

4-6 clicks out from full hard on rebound

FTS:

10-12 clicks in from full soft on compression

1 1/4" preload from top of shock body to ring, or about 5mm of spring compression

RTS:

10-12 clicks in from full soft on compression

QA adjuster at 2.25
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
Reduce preload on front AND center springs. Reducing front preload only will make the center ride too high and feel tippy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
You have your front springs preloaded 3mm below clips. I have mine 3/4 above and weight 75lbs more geared up. My sled doesn't high side. I also have no preload on centre spring with sled at rest no rider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
563 Posts
No preload on the center spring helps keep it down. Check into monster performance dual rate front springs. I run 1" of sag with no rider and its way smoother than stock in the stutters and doesn't roll in the corners.

Problem I run into with no center spring preload is it needs more spring on huge rollers in the ditch. I was thinking about trying a different spring set up, maybe adding another little spring if there's room so I can have more spring compression with less actual preload.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
912 Posts
Try drilling a new hole in limter strap in the middle of stock hole down in between the next hole. Puts perfect ski pressure on front and hold a line when cornering Did it on mine as some others have....best mod for no money
 

·
Scuttle Buttin' Solo
Joined
·
73,579 Posts
Lift the rear of the sled and go to the front skid shock or center shock.........loosen the spanner nut so that there is only enough pressure on that spring to keep it from being sloppy (nearly full extension) ........ride it and adjust the nut until you are happy with with the amount of effort you need to use to turn the bars and leave it.....and adjust other spring pre-load accordingly...

The idea is to have the pre-load as soft as you can get it without bottoming or having severe inside ski lift THEN adjust the knobs.....this makes the lowest center of gravity which leads to railing corners and keeping it flat while doing so.......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Tilt your handle bar as forward as you can to put some of your weight forward to keep it down.
This usually helps to keep the skis planted
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
424 Posts
Tilt your handle bar as forward as you can to put some of your weight forward to keep it down.
This usually helps to keep the skis planted
The best riding position is the riser inline with the stem. Gives you the most leverage over the bars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,810 Posts
if it were mine i'd send all the shocks in and get clean oil and a gas charge in them. then star playing around with your settings.

You can't beat a fresh set of shocks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,339 Posts
Working on my 2014 XRS suspension set up and have some questions for the shock/setup guru's out there.

My XRS really likes to high side in the corners, or lift inside ski high and ride out the corner on the outside ski. I don't suffer from any push in soft/slippery conditions, but I do when conditions are tight/stiff and the track wants to push the front end through, and usually wants to high side.

Here's my main question. It seems my sled wants to roll up on the outside ski in the corners instead of staying flat. If I add alot of rebound it helps, but I feel I'm running way more rebound then I should run. Usually this is about 4 clicks out from full in.

There are alot of members here that talk about reducing front shock preload past where the clip is supposed to stop the ring. If I do this, the roll is worse and requires a alot more compression to control the pitching of the sled.

If I increase preload the front end tightens up and roll is reduced, but starts to stiffen up the front end a bit too much.

So..how much preload should the front end of these sleds really have. Opposite to what most members are doing of reducing preload, I find more stability in increasing preload. I'm not adding much in addition to where the clip is. Maybe 3mm

In your opinions, on the XRS, should I be tuning of slightly more preload or more the high levels of compression and rebound. It would be nice if Doo had some markings on the threaded adjuster to help us compare and gauge settings on the front and center shocks. I just find it hard to believe had that clip but in a place where you need to reduce preload further.

I'm 160 lbs, running the stock 1.25" ripsaw with 84 studs, and the Pilot 5.7R skis.

I typically find my settings at:

Front:

12-14 clicks in from full soft on compression

4-6 clicks out from full hard on rebound

FTS:

10-12 clicks in from full soft on compression

1 1/4" preload from top of shock body to ring, or about 5mm of spring compression

RTS:

10-12 clicks in from full soft on compression

QA adjuster at 2.25
First, do not worry about running too much rebound. If it helps use it, that is what it is for. If you do not like lowering front spring preload leave it and just vary compression to get what you like. Comparing how many clicks on any of these settings is useless from 1 sled to another as poor as the nitrogen charge comes from the factory. If your shocks were given a proper charge and good oil then lowering spring preload would help your situation not hurt it. If you tend to get lift in corners it starts from not enough body roll.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,172 Posts
If you want no ski lift, sit down hard on the seat and have someone adjust the limiter strap so it has zero slack at static ride height. Tune the from and centre springs for steering effort and weight distribution. (stiffer fronts tends to sharpen handling, and increase steering effort. Usually requires some extra rear torsion spring pressure.... There are more than a few routes to get to no ski lift, but this one ensures you can still get on the throttle and the ski will stay down.
 

·
old ski-dool
Joined
·
3,313 Posts
Everybody wants to fix it with mechanical adjustments.

I say..... Get that 160lb. frame of yours out and over the inside ski. That will keep it down. Then adjust everything else for a smooth ride.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top