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In time we will know if it's a game changer. Let's wait and see how the mountain riders respond. See how well these sell and how they perform. Reliability and performance has yet to be proven. For now it's all talk.
I might tend to agree if this power plant was built in Roseau or Thief River Falls. Thankfully Austria is a world away from 'Up Nort'. :eek:

BRP/Rotax has been working on this project for at least 3 years. They must be pretty confident to be shipping units this week to western dealers. I also don't believe that BRP built a 'time bomb' just because it has a turbo. Not sure how many times it needs to be said here... it's an 'altitude compensating' turbo, not a 'let's generated gobs more power from this stock engine' oh and don't forget to bring the $20 per gallon VP gas.

My John Deere 5065E has a 3 cyl 2.9L turbo-diesel, which is rated at 67 hp (50 PTO hp) at sea level. I'm guessing that it is close to those same power ratings here at 9000 ft. Whereas if it was't a turbo, it would certainly be down by at least 20-25 hp at 9000 ft.
 

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Mountain riders for 30 or 40 years were the step-children of the Snowmobile manufacturers. Everything was directed to trail riders, if you wanted to ride deep snow you had to innovative and be willing to chop, mod, and experiment to make things work. Come around 2010 the winds changed and mountain riders started getting some love from the manufacturers. Trail riders have gotten plenty over the past ten years, please quit whining about the mountain market getting their due... Thank you and have a nice day :Cheers
Word
 

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Mountain riders for 30 or 40 years were the step-children of the Snowmobile manufacturers. Everything was directed to trail riders, if you wanted to ride deep snow you had to innovative and be willing to chop, mod, and experiment to make things work. Come around 2010 the winds changed and mountain riders started getting some love from the manufacturers. Trail riders have gotten plenty over the past ten years, please quit whining about the mountain market getting their due... Thank you and have a nice day :Cheers
I agree completely.

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Any ride reports on this rig yet?
 

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Yes skib is right hp drop is a struggle for guys with a hp addiction ????this is not a mountain sled guys it’s a true universal sled that you can ride from the snow belt northern sask to the peaks of BC or wherever you ride .
 

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Here is something for you guys .
At 2000 feet a Na 850 is down 9.90 hp vrs sea level
4000 ft 19.70
8000 ft 38.60

So at 10000 feet this turbo 850 will make the same hp as a Na 850 at 2000 feet all on pump gas only have to start messing with clickers at 8000 plus feet such a game changer imo
Air Density is not linear.

At 2000 ft. there is hardly any difference to that of sea-level air density. When's the last time anyone changed main jets to go from sea-level to 2000 ft? The answer, is only someone with too much time on their hands.

Once you get above 7000 ft, that's when Air Density really takes a dive, and it does so in much larger proportions for every 1000 ft of ascent. In layman terms, if you think the air is 'thin' at 8000 ft., wait until you get up to 10,000 ft., and if you thought that was rough, 12,000 ft. will really kick you butt. Why do you think climbers on Everest carry O2?
 

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Air Density is not linear.

At 2000 ft. there is hardly any difference to that of sea-level air density. When's the last time anyone changed main jets to go from sea-level to 2000 ft? The answer, is only someone with too much time on their hands.

Once you get above 7000 ft, that's when Air Density really takes a dive, and it does so in much larger proportions for every 1000 ft of ascent. In layman terms, if you think the air is 'thin' at 8000 ft., wait until you get up to 10,000 ft., and if you thought that was rough, 12,000 ft. will really kick you butt. Why do you think climbers on Everest carry O2?
Looks pretty linear to me :shrug
 

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Weather plays a role in density also. If a high or low pressure front rolls in, this is going to change the density for more or less at a certain altitude. Soo for instance if the new turbo summit is at 7000 ft one day with a low pressure front, its going to have to make more boost to create the 165 hp. Then the following day a high pressure front moves in and the turbo is going to make less boost to create the 165 hp at the same 7000 ft. Air density is linear to an extent, but there are always other variables that make it not as linear as it appears. Temperature also affects density. And other factors also..
 

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20k USD?? jesus i m not going to even convert what it would cost over here lol
its 18k usd.

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Funny thing about the inter-mountain west... generally there is not a whole lot of snowmobiling happening below 8000 ft. Unless you happen to like running up and down a barren hay field.

When we get a winter storm heading our way, it's always predicted as rain below 7500 ft, and snow above 8000 ft. I'm fortunate in that I live at 9000 ft, and can ride right from my garage to get up to the deep powder areas between 10,000 and 12,000 ft.
I don't know what the "inter mountain west" is and what it wouldn't encompass but up here even around the meca of Western riding, Revelstoke the riding starts to get good around 4500'. The Boulder Mtn cabin as an example is 5400'. We regularly ride 5000-7000' all day in champagne pow.

Further SW in the kootenays we ride right from the garage door at 1500' to 7500'.

Up North in Valemount riding is also from 5000-7000'. We rarely go over 8000'

So it sounds like for now this sled is ideal and even geared more towards the Western Canadian Market than the 10,000'+ riding South of the 49th Parallel.

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Looks like what many suspected back in the spring of 2016 was true.

" In speaking with Ski-Doo officials, Krob learned that adding a turbo was a part of the original design goals for the 850 E-TEC engine that was unveiled for model year 2017. Plus, the turbo is different that the one found on four-stroke Rotax products, including the 900 ACE Turbo snowmobiles. "

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Sorry, air DOES get thinner linearly as you go up in elevation. The 3% number does not change whether you are 0-1000ft or 10,000-11,000 ft. When talking density altitude, you are combining elevation, temperature, pressure, and humidity into a calculation. Fyi, pressure and humidity are very small factors in the calculation, the max and min of each only affect density altitude a few hundred feet. The other two(temp/elevation) are the driving factors, and most influence.
 

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The 850 E-Tec Turbo has a sensor intergraded in the CVT cover, this will take a reading in the CVT area when the heat is too high, this will send a signal to the ECM and set off a notification in the cluster. There are two levels of functions one is a belt overload condition and the other is a belt overheat condition.

Note:
You may see belt temp in the cluster if it's selected (A)

Belt overheat condition:

If the belt temperature reaches 75 Celsius/167 Fahrenheit a message will appear BELT OVERHEAT + 2 beeps every 10 seconds and once the belt temperature becomes lower then 75 Celsius/167 Fahrenheit the message disappears.

Belt overload condition:

If a critical condition is detected over 1 minute a message will display BELT OVERLOAD + 2 beeps every 15 seconds, if the rider reduces critical overload style of riding the message disappears.

If it's still in a critical condition for over 10 minutes the BELT OVERLOAD appears + 2 beeps every 10 seconds, the message will not disappear until engine shutdown.

This will not reduce any power lost but will advise the rider to ease up to help save the belt.

This will also resister two codes in BUDS:

Level 1 = P3311: Overload with Warning in the cluster
Level 2 = P3312: Overload with Warning in the cluster but rider continue to run hard.
 

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Amazing technology going into these sled.
 

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WoW... now there's some new tech, easy enough to put a temp sensor in the clutch cover but I wonder how it determines "overload" condition
 

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I assume the temperature will increase... then at a given point the overload will trigger?

Us flat landers could use this technology as well. LOL. Beep beep. Back off time.
 

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Haha, new tech always brings out the same guys with charts, comments, complaints and opinions. The line graph had me laugh out loud. Buy it if you want it, otherwise stay out of the way. I applaud the effort, they lead the charge. Hope it's a fantastic sled that yields big profitability for SKIDOO. Let them stay independent, continue the R&D effort and keep us all watching for the next big release.
 
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Yeah, it may be a game changer for the mountain crowd but for us flatlanders, not so much. At least Doo gave us the 600R and the 900T both of which were obviously designed primarily for trail use. But we got them in the mountain sled first trail sled second G4 chassis. I have a feeling the 2008 XP just might go down as the last purpose built from the ground up trail sled we ever see from BRP. With each passing year and each big reveal it's becoming increasingly clear just where we bottom of the barrel trail riders stand in the pecking order. Shoot, in last year's new model unveiling they even talked about the utility sleds before they got to the lowly recreational trail sleds. Is it all the climate change hype? IDK, there's plenty of snow right now in northern Minnesota. Are mountain sleds really outselling flatland sleds (shorties & x-overs combined)? That's hard to believe. Don't the majority of snowmobilers live in the mid-west and out east? Is the top brass just made up of a bunch of mountain enthusiasts? What is it?

Go ahead, call me a negative Nancy or a complainer. But us trail / ditch guys want a new front end that steers as light as the 3rd & 4th place player Yamacat. Or heck, even as light as a 2012 XP would do it. And we're sick of getting nickel & dimmed with spendy LED accessories to get what is really a safety necessity - being able to see at night.
It could be seen as one for flatlanders, if this 850T ends up in a lowered shorty for flatlanders...=MACH-Z, or an X package option for the MXZ or Gade.
 

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