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I added some saddlebags and a tunnel bag to my 2015 900Ace Renegade. So now I can actually carry some extra emergency, and comfort items.

I ride mostly in Upper Peninsula and we can get pretty far out in the boonies at times. So being prepared for a breakdown or emergency is wise.

Here is a list of some items I'm putting together for my saddlebags and Tunnel bag.

Extra shirt, extra socks, hat, toe warmers, extra gloves

Small fire making kit, batteries, 30oz MSR fuel bottle, tow rope, ratchet strap, extra handheld gps, Silky Saw, Leatherman Wave, Drive Belt,

Spot Emergency Locator...still got some room for more
 

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In the nose I have rope and a siphone hose with a marine primer bulb. Dash bag I have spark plugs, cigerette lighter socket that plugs into my battery tender pig tail for charging my phone, leatherman, and a flash light. Tunnel bag I think just my spare belt is in there.
I should probably pay attention to this thread and pack more seeing I ride alone.
 

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If you have a 4 strokes and looks like you do a jumper cable is priceless, and the fuel caddy could come in handy. Remember $1.00 per gallon fuel can become $10.00 per gallon on the trials...lol

I would also add tow strap, for when you see the broken down Arctic Cats...
 

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I carry two belts,tools,small length of wire,siphon hose,tow strap,fire starter kit,extra gloves,couple cans of beer in beer cosies to prevent breaking,pepperoni sticks,granola bar,TP in a zip-lock and a toque.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In the nose I have rope and a siphone hose with a marine primer bulb. Dash bag I have spark plugs, cigerette lighter socket that plugs into my battery tender pig tail for charging my phone, leatherman, and a flash light. Tunnel bag I think just my spare belt is in there.
I should probably pay attention to this thread and pack more seeing I ride alone.
I like this, I'm going to look at adding a few items to the front.
 

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Belt & tool kit on sled; then in the backpack I have a minimal but more extensive tool kit, led dive light with extra batteries, extra gloves & balaclava, hand warmer packs, minimalist first aid kit, signal device, spare down mid layer, spare goggles, code brown kit (toilet paper), water bottle, cash, high protein snacks, and some other random crap...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I would be concerned with the batteries freezing.
ToolGuyd > Hand Tools > EDC, Pocket, & Multitools > Which Batteries for Flashlights and Tools in Cold Weather

Which Batteries for Flashlights and Tools in Cold Weather

JANUARY 28, 2014
STUART 9 COMMENTS

Which batteries are suitable for use in (higher-powered LED) flashlights and (higher-drain) tools in cold weather?

The quick answer: lithium.

In general, alkaline batteries perform very poorly in cold weather. As alkaline batteries are engineered with a water-based electrolyte, cold near-freezing point temperatures can lead to reduced ion mobility which slows down the chemical reactions that provide electrical battery power. This leads to a drop in performance, runtime, or both.

In some cases, cold temperatures can cause alkaline batteries to burst and leak.

Rechargeable batteries tend to perform poorly in cold temperatures as well. I typically use Sanyo Eneloop NiMH batteries in my AA and AAA-sized flashlights, but these batteries aren't any better than alkalines when temperatures drop near freezing.

According to Sanyo's datasheet (PDF), basic AA Eneloops are only rated down to 0°C/32°F. Any colder than that and you can probably expect to see greatly reduced performance in medium and high-drain flashlights and devices.

Lithium batteries, on the other hand, perform quite well when it's cold out.

Panasonic's CR123A lithium batteries (PDF) have an operating temperature range of -40° to + 70°C (-40° to 158°F), while Energizer's Ultimate Lithium L91 AA batteries (PDF) have a similar operating temperature range of -40° to 60°C (-40° to 140°F).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I venture into the backcountry alone quit often, and having a small portable hand winch of some sort could be a lifesaver. A few years ago I got myself stuck and had to get myself out alone. Wasn't far from home and walked back and got a small boat trailor hand winch..it worked.
 

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Just a small thing to add....I recently wrapped my header and purchased some stainless steal zip ties that were pretty inexpensive but more durable than the standard plastic ties a lot of us throw in the bag. ive used zips for years in many instances, but these stainless ones are pretty slick and cheap...I think I paid like 7.00 for a bag of 100 off amazon.
 
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Small flares....they are great for starting fires, signaling, scaring away unwanted guests, all kinds of stuff!
A SnoBunge works great and you can wrap it around the backend of sled....takes up zero space....and they have a kit
you can attach to trees to help pull sleds out. Folding saw comes in handy. Duct tape and electrical tape.
Fuses and relays along with some extra wiring....

Above all else a good knife is essential.
 

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Tow strap, flash light, folding multi tool, some wire, tape, zip ties. Don't carry siphon hose anymore, heard stories of nice guys trying to help somebody and ruining fuel pickup/sending unit inside their own tank.
 

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- first aid kit

- emergency blanket

- Water proof matches and fire starter kit

- Gerber multi tool, screw drivers, jackknife, pliers

- Duct tape & electrical tape

- Rope

- Siphon

- Zip ties

- Rubber bungees

- Spare plugs, (2) spare head light bulbs, (1) tail light bulb

- Small cake pan, like 6" square ( can't tell you how many times on trail side and set parts down only to loose in snow, Also I figure will work for making water if I start a fire)

- spare relay

- Liner gloves, socks

- chemical hand warmers

- fuses

- Glow sticks

- Flash light

- stocking cap

- Couple rags
 

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Put everything in ziplock bags to keep them dry while in the bag. Even if the bag is waterproof, a few time dragging things in and out will wear away the waterproofing layer. Different sizes of ziplock baggies helps you stay organized while keeping things dry.
 
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