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Hello,

None of us want to be stuck out in the woods because we are missing some simple needed tool that is not in the standard toolkit that comes with the machine. So, I'm wondering what extra tools that you carry with you. Most of the extra tools that I carry are based on doing some work on the machine. For example, I want to be sure that I have track tools that would make it easy to put the track back on should it derail. I want to be sure to have electrical tape. I want a piece of gas line for priming. I want a real spark plug wrench.

Following are some pictures of the tools that I carry on my 06 Tundra all kept in the under-seat storage. I also carry a rope and some pulleys in the big green pack. Things like a compass and matches are also in the pack. That big blue pack you see often in my pictures has a complete change of winter clothes in addition to the 1/2" rope and pulleys. My thermos fits in the pocket of the blue pack. I have the clothes inside the blue pack in a waterproof bag and make a point of not getting into it except for an emergency. The black pack is my day pack with lunch, extra gloves, balaclava, etc. The long gray case has my snowshoes, avalanche shovel, and probe. When going out with someone else I wear my beacon.

So, share your expertise on tools that you always have along with you.

Dan
 

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Dan,
I always wondered what you had in that bag.
I carry 2 extra spark plugs, 2 vise grips, one adjustable wrench, 6 track clips, a 16 x 16 tarp, 50 feet of rope, 2 pulleys, 1 first aid kit, 2 sterno cans, a come-along (which i will eliminate, see below), electrical tape, wire, duct tape, a lighter and my most used tool, my machete. I also carry a shovel (under the windshield and between the handle bars and my snowshoes (stored on each side of the cab behind the wraparound bumper. As for clothing, an extra pair of socks, 2 sets of gloves and a small cookset. Most of the time i carry a small .410 shotgun.

In my fanny pack, i have my gps, a compass, a multitool, a folding saw, collar wire, marking tape, high quality lighter, magnesium block with striker, bandaids, led flashlight, led frontal lamp, shotgun shells, fishing wire and hooks

One of the things i want to do is replace my come-along. I feel that this is too cumbersome and difficult to handle in very cold temps. Also, in order to move a stuck machine, you have to lift the strap once it is tightened up anyways. So, now i am looking to replace this by rope and a sailboat pulley. These pulleys have a locking mechanism and once placed on a tree would enable me to pull the slack from the rope. I would then move the machine by pulling the rope up at midspan, and without moving, i would pull the slack again through the pulley repeating this until the machine is free. I think this will be the quickest and most efficient way to get unstuck, but i need to find a pulley that is strong enough.

Finally, i will likely add a sleeping bag and a thermarest cushion.

At this point, you must be wondering where i put all this. Well, a lot of it fits under my seat in a lightweight compartment i made to raise the seat. This compartment was the best mod i made...
 

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I carry a spare belt, a leatherman, a 1,000lb tow strap, lighter, a couple maps of the area I'm riding in. I'm also going to put a couple feet of hose should I need to siphon gas or get gas out of the tank to start a fire.

Before you tell me it isn't enough, I almost always ride with someone else (and in the daylight). It's on a well-travelled trail system and we generally don't do off-trail riding as you guys do. When I ride by myself I also have a backpack with some extra food, clothes, and a couple nalgene bottles of water.
 

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I bring a real spark plug socket like you said and also a set of about 10 different sized metric sockets and 3 different length extension bars for the ratchet. I have a set of metric allen keys as well. Then spare belt, spare plugs, tow rope, flashlight, lighter ... the usual. Still looking for a good portable shovel that I can stow inside the cowl.

Also keep a pair of those split-cowhide insulated work gloves on the sled. My sledding mitts and the thin glove liners I sometimes wear inside the mitts are no good for working on the sled. The work gloves are warm and protect from tearing your hands up on cold sharp metal & plastic.
 

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An adjustable wrench, pliers and a screwdriver with an assortment of hex, star, etc bits added to the standard Doo kit. I figure that if I can't fix it with that, I would be bumming a ride or walking out on my own anyways. I have stopped carrying more tools because they are just too heavy.
 

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Axe, saw, cable ties, duct tape, rope, tow strap. And a lighter and fully charged insurance policy in case i need to burn my sled cause i cant get er goin!!
 

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I've done this with other vehicles but not the sleds yet-
Everytime I touch the rig over a years time or so write down the tools I use for the work I've done. Then, I add or delete the tools or equipment on the list based on reality, probability of use, and practicality.
For instance, a 1/4" ratchet would be useful but a 9mm socket for it would be silly (at least on my sleds). 10mm combination wrench? Heck yeah! It seems like a 10mm anything is very useful on Ski Doo products.
 

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When going out alone off trail, I try to be ready to spend the night in the woods if I have to. Walking back home even on snowshoes is often not an option mostly because of the depth and sotness of the snow even in the snowmobile tracks. Usually though, the tracks harden somewhat overnight making walking out easier. Three years ago, my very best friend went out alone one morning. I coulldn't make it that weekend. I searched for him for three months before finding him, one kilometer from his machine. He most probably did not make it through the first night.
The best tools are those that keep you safe because it is just a matter of time before your machine breaks down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
When going out alone off trail, I try to be ready to spend the night in the woods if I have to. Walking back home even on snowshoes is often not an option mostly because of the depth and sotness of the snow even in the snowmobile tracks. Usually though, the tracks harden somewhat overnight making walking out easier. Three years ago, my very best friend went out alone one morning. I coulldn't make it that weekend. I searched for him for three months before finding him, one kilometer from his machine. He most probably did not make it through the first night.
The best tools are those that keep you safe because it is just a matter of time before your machine breaks down.
Exactly and so sorry about your friend.
 

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holy moly..where do I start. I was laughed at this weekend because I carry an action packer with survival gear. My good friend lives in the bushes and he thinks I am crazy to carry all my gear, even when there are several of us. I'd rather have it and not need it, then need it and not have it. I won't be able to remember everything but:

4 extra gallons of fuel

4 spark plugs

avalanche shovel

signal mirror

channel lock

screw drivers

extra belt

pair of shoe laces

steel wool

3 cigarrette lighters

zippo

matches

2 flints

hatchet

folding saw

2 tarps

snowshoes 10x35

64 ounces of water

extra gloves, hat, socks

quart of injection oil

100 feet rope

extra fuses

flashlight (hand generator, not battery powered)

2 handheld gps

2 compass'

fuel siphon

energy bars

cashews

peanuts

other random food items

.357 + 5 extra rounds

wallet

phone

camera

extra heat shield wire

can't think!! Usually i am within 5-10 miles of a plowed road but that is a long 5-10. I am prepared to stay the night. its the safest thing to do
 

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A lot of the survival stuff is not so expensive. I have started hiding 5 gallon pails with such items in "strategic" locations. I have only done one so far but plan on at least 2 more. The "must have" stuff I always have on me. What I want in these pails are things that will help make that unplanned stay much more comfortable.

I would certainly like to know if some of you do this and/or what you would include.
 

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I am but a simple man sledding within a population. I too carry simple tools, shovel, some parts, clothes, snacks. How long are you going out and where? I'm central Ontario, with full cell service. My best tool is glympse.com , permission based tracking. Sent to my wife, brother, and a few friends. If riding alone, my wife can collect the insurance upon my death, or brother and friends can come save my azz from a breakdown or visit to the rhubarb or breakdown. I never go out in dangerous conditions. I have no intentions of being on the front page of paper!
 

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Tundraman Dan I like your idea of using a tupperwear container as a tool box for the sled. I might have to borrow that idea and steal a few containers from the wife.

I like keeping my tools and survival gear / first aid stuff separate. I normally carry a pack with a shovel and avy probe poles on my body that has a basic survival kit and lots of snacks with water and extra hat and gloves. On the sled I carry extra tools, recovery gear, pruning saw, extra shovel, extra survival kit. It's very possible I could be seperated from my sled in a survival situation and I don't want all my eggs in one spot. Some of the guys I ride with are not that prepared so I figure I need to take extra gear with to save their asses as well. Or to fix their busted Polaris or Cat. All those years as a Boy Scout taught me to be prepared.

Just learned the hard way this year to throw in a couple of Allen wrenches in the tool pouch for the bolts on the Y pipe exhaust manifold FYI....

There's always something we don't have with it seems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Tundraman Dan I like your idea of using a tupperwear container as a tool box for the sled. I might have to borrow that idea and steal a few containers from the wife.

I like keeping my tools and survival gear / first aid stuff separate. I normally carry a pack with a shovel and avy probe poles on my body that has a basic survival kit and lots of snacks with water and extra hat and gloves. On the sled I carry extra tools, recovery gear, pruning saw, extra shovel, extra survival kit. It's very possible I could be seperated from my sled in a survival situation and I don't want all my eggs in one spot. Some of the guys I ride with are not that prepared so I figure I need to take extra gear with to save their asses as well. Or to fix their busted Polaris or Cat. All those years as a Boy Scout taught me to be prepared.

Just learned the hard way this year to throw in a couple of Allen wrenches in the tool pouch for the bolts on the Y pipe exhaust manifold FYI....

There's always something we don't have with it seems.
Thanks,

The tough, flexible ones with a good lid are great for tools and keeping the rust off. For my 94 Tundra I found a long narrow one that fits down in the space by the chain case nicely.

Dan
 
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