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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey I'm looking at lowering the weight of the tundra extreme, let me know what you guys come up with. Right off the top of my head I think about removing the es. Anything else, I don't want to spend tonnes of money on this either, would just like to make it as light as possible.

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Classic mountain rider debate. How light do you really need to go dude! The Xtreme is pretty darn light. If you want, ditch the electric start, but why? The utility sleds have a heavier skid frame, and rightly so, so hard to dump that. You could get all crazy and put in a Summit skid, but again, why? It's light, reliable, ride and have fun.
I guess this is the new post you were referring to?
Look at it this way, a Tundra Xtreme will do probably 90% of what a Summit 600 will do, but Summit won't do what a Tundra can. I've ridden an Xtreme and have an M8 162. The Xtreme is a great sled as is. If you want a sSummit, buy it, gear it down, re-clutch, but you'll still have a-arms.
Did I mention you should just buy the Xtreme and ride?
 
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You could ditch the electric start and get a lighter exhaust but for the places a Tundra Extreme is meant to go, the 20 lbs won't really make a difference.
 

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I've considered weight reduction options on my Xtreme as well as my Summit. I don't think there is very much to be gained. If you ride your Xtreme in powder (if you don't, etiquette dictates you best pass it along to someone that will) it might be worthwhile to try to minimize snow/slush/ice accumulation with Frogzskin over the vents and remove all the under hood foam.

Depending what year your Xtreme is, you might look at accumulation in the skid or on the running boards too.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm already planning on taking the Es off. Then it's absolutely perfect, thanks for the opinions guys.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So you guys really don't feel the tundra x needs to be any lighter? I was only asking this as I'm not a big person and I'm used to sub 400lb sleds. So for me the lighter sled always seems to be better.

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So you guys really don't feel the tundra x needs to be any lighter? I was only asking this as I'm not a big person and I'm used to sub 400lb sleds. So for me the lighter sled always seems to be better.

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You are kind of touching on an ongoing discussion that has taken place in these utility forums over the past 8-10 years! While the sleds have gotten heavier and more powerful, they have lost one of their biggest appealing traits to most backwoods trappers and adventurers: lightweight for getting unstuck and general mobility!! However, there has been a trade off. The newer sleds are quite strong (pyramidial frames) and do have more general HP (60 - 120 HP for the most part).

Most in these forums, especially the true backwoods adventurers would love to see the return of a lightweight "mechanical snowshoe" that can go about anywhere and is easy to maneuver and maintain. However, the industry has not really gone in that direction.

Almost ALL of us came from sleds that were once under, or around, 400 lbs. (I had an Elan as a kid and rode a Safari 377 around as a teen). We've sleds get taller, wider, and more powerful and with those changes you can go to almost all of the same places you went before because the flotation, clearance, and power is so improved. But the simplicity is kind of "gone" and so isn't the ease of lifting up the rear end and swinging it around when you are stuck!

So, welcome to the discussion. :) These utility forums are still having it!! haha You might be interested (and it worth your time) to find b550's thread on his custom made snowmobile. THAT is what is a lightweight, hassle-free, go anywhere machine is supposed to look like!
 

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I'll throw this out there; put some Polaris Pro Float skis on it. The ride quality in deep snow between the doo skis and the Pro Floats is night and day. Was out for three days the other weekend with my LT, a Tundra Sport and an Xtreme. Everyone tried my 550 LT and were blown away by how well it handled with the wider skis. We were in 3' of powder, and compared to the others, mine wasn't tippy at all, but you could still flick it onto an edge very easily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Is there any 12 inch ski skins for the doo? I know Arctic cats have them

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Buy the Extreme, ride it, and them decide if you need to pull off stuff.

I have a feeling you will be amazed how agile the tundra is. With the 32" stance and 120 hp, there is some smile factor.

Weight is not always bad, i have a Tundra R, and i will take the new tundra any day.

Still use the Tundra R to haul some firewood and puttering around the yard but any long trip, rather have a bigger machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Anyone know if it's possible to put a t motion skid into a tundra x then attach the articulated suspension? They do sell the articulated suspension part/mod in on the tmotion 154 summit so why couldn't I put that skid into the tundra x?

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks, that settles it then, is your newer tundra more capable then the old one?

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You are kind of touching on an ongoing discussion that has taken place in these utility forums over the past 8-10 years! While the sleds have gotten heavier and more powerful, they have lost one of their biggest appealing traits to most backwoods trappers and adventurers: lightweight for getting unstuck and general mobility!! However, there has been a trade off. The newer sleds are quite strong (pyramidial frames) and do have more general HP (60 - 120 HP for the most part).

Most in these forums, especially the true backwoods adventurers would love to see the return of a lightweight "mechanical snowshoe" that can go about anywhere and is easy to maneuver and maintain. However, the industry has not really gone in that direction.

Almost ALL of us came from sleds that were once under, or around, 400 lbs. (I had an Elan as a kid and rode a Safari 377 around as a teen). We've sleds get taller, wider, and more powerful and with those changes you can go to almost all of the same places you went before because the flotation, clearance, and power is so improved. But the simplicity is kind of "gone" and so isn't the ease of lifting up the rear end and swinging it around when you are stuck!

So, welcome to the discussion. :) These utility forums are still having it!! haha You might be interested (and it worth your time) to find b550's thread on his custom made snowmobile. THAT is what is a lightweight, hassle-free, go anywhere machine is supposed to look like
Over the years, I have been upgrading my sled to make it more capable in the deep snow. What I discovered was that with my type of riding, no matter how capable the sled is (to an extent) I will always find it's limits. Having a lighter sled sure does make it easier when you go over that limit.

Another thing to consider is how easy it is to flick the sled around, especially if you aren't a big dude. I traded my 06 for a buddy's 550 sport for a ride on a lake once. We both came to the conclusion that his sled was pretty nice, but we sure could notice the weight difference when trying to carve and stuff. Not as easy as my 06 for this 160lb wimp. My problem is that everything I do to make my sled better, makes it a little bit heavier.....
 
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