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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone changed there ts skis to a different type? What is involved?
Have you had any luck in selling them? And what is the value?.. Thinking of buying a blizzard and like wider skis so just wondering...

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Has anyone changed there ts skis to a different type? What is involved?
Have you had any luck in selling them? And what is the value?.. Thinking of buying a blizzard and like wider skis so just wondering...

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Going through the same decisions now as you so I am also interested to know.
 

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Just curious. I chose not to get the new skis when I ordered. Is there an issue? Would have cost me about 750 as adjustable option so opted out
 

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Dealer told me that they would swap out if I didn't really want them.
He said there is a little swap out time but wasn't sure if any other parts would be needed at the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm told spindles need to be changed? True or false?

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As long as it's a 2016 new spindles are not req'd. There is just a spacer that fills the area that the adjuster is in and that's about it. My dealer replaced mine with pilot R's before I even picked it up. Sold the TS skis for 20% of retail which is what the purchaser could have bought them for -tax money. Win for both of us.
 

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I believe they may work like R's If you can find them 7" carbides and you pay a third more for them than pilot carbides. I also believe they are similar because of the bottom profile not because they have an adjustable carbide that is never tight and rock in the ski. I will stick with the R's for now.
 

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I believe they may work like R's If you can find them 7" carbides and you pay a third more for them than pilot carbides. I also believe they are similar because of the bottom profile not because they have an adjustable carbide that is never tight and rock in the ski. I will stick with the R's for now.
I don't know what you are really taking about when you say "never tight and rock in the ski." I put on over 600 miles last week and the TS skis work very, very well. There is noticeable difference in steering when you adjust the carbide depth and it was great to be able to deal with changing trail conditions throughout the day.

While the replacement carbides are $100 - $130 that is still cheaper than the Bergstrom Triple points I run on my wife's 2012 MXZ X 600 and used to run on my old 2013 TNT 800. I've also had no issued finding the 5" or 7" replacement carbides.

My wife would not let me get her a new sled this year because she liked the way her sled handled and rode. After riding my Enduro with the TS skis she was surprised at how much easier it was to steer.

Maybe you are racing SnoCross and your comments are valid but for 80%b of the trail riders out there, I think the TS skis are great and will do very well.
 

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I don't know what you are really taking about when you say "never tight and rock in the ski." I put on over 600 miles last week and the TS skis work very, very well. There is noticeable difference in steering when you adjust the carbide depth and it was great to be able to deal with changing trail conditions throughout the day.

While the replacement carbides are $100 - $130 that is still cheaper than the Bergstrom Triple points I run on my wife's 2012 MXZ X 600 and used to run on my old 2013 TNT 800. I've also had no issued finding the 5" or 7" replacement carbides.

My wife would not let me get her a new sled this year because she liked the way her sled handled and rode. After riding my Enduro with the TS skis she was surprised at how much easier it was to steer.

Maybe you are racing SnoCross and your comments are valid but for 80%b of the trail riders out there, I think the TS skis are great and will do very well.
Tip your sled on its side or lift it up. push on the front or back of the carbide. They rock back and forth. How many people would run with loose carbides before this design came out. How many people would have purchased any carbide with a 5/16" host bar? Not many. Are any of these observations a big deal, probably not or BRP wouldn't put them on sleds. I typically run shaper or woodys carbides and depending on whats in stock at the time and I have pay between 60 and 90 a set and everybody stocks them not just BRP dealers. I still say these that the actual ski profile has way more to do with feel and performance of a ski that than the amount of host bar sticking below it. No snowcross racing for me, way to old for that but I do enjoy a spirited run from time to time and the Pilot R's perform better than standard pilots with less effort than C&A's. I don't remember when the R'S came out but it was sometime around '08 and I probably have 15K+ miles on them on three different sleds and that's why I sold my TS for something that I know works. I also agree 80-90% of riders would like them and the same riders probably liked the standard pilot also. Look at the profile of a TS and a standard pilot. They are very similar other than the carbide moves. I am glad that the TS is getting good reviews because my next set will probably be for sale also.

think snow.

1eye
 

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you can run the same spindles. You just need to buy a W shaped insert that goes where the adjustment blob used to sit. I think it's pretty cheap.
 

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I also choose not to go with the TS skis. Personally thought with my riding style I would break them. I like the way the 5.7 with 7.5 shaper bars handle and wasn't willing to try a 750.00 option that could be a mistake. Plus I look at down the road if they rust or oxidase that would be NOT good.
 

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I also choose not to go with the TS skis. Personally thought with my riding style I would break them. I like the way the 5.7 with 7.5 shaper bars handle and wasn't willing to try a 750.00 option that could be a mistake. Plus I look at down the road if they rust or oxidase that would be NOT good.
Welcome to DOOTalk fat kid....
 

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Tip your sled on its side or lift it up. push on the front or back of the carbide. They rock back and forth. How many people would run with loose carbides before this design came out. How many people would have purchased any carbide with a 5/16" host bar? Not many. Are any of these observations a big deal, probably not or BRP wouldn't put them on sleds. I typically run shaper or woodys carbides and depending on whats in stock at the time and I have pay between 60 and 90 a set and everybody stocks them not just BRP dealers. I still say these that the actual ski profile has way more to do with feel and performance of a ski that than the amount of host bar sticking below it. No snowcross racing for me, way to old for that but I do enjoy a spirited run from time to time and the Pilot R's perform better than standard pilots with less effort than C&A's. I don't remember when the R'S came out but it was sometime around '08 and I probably have 15K+ miles on them on three different sleds and that's why I sold my TS for something that I know works. I also agree 80-90% of riders would like them and the same riders probably liked the standard pilot also. Look at the profile of a TS and a standard pilot. They are very similar other than the carbide moves. I am glad that the TS is getting good reviews because my next set will probably be for sale also.

think snow.

1eye
So have you actually ridden with the TS skis to have an informed opinion? You realize than actual engineers designed the TS skis? Do you actually ride with you sled tipped on it's side so the carbides can move around? (Sorry... being a bit of a smart a$$.... :laugh_old: )

Do this test if you have not done so..... but do with your sled actually in the position you ride it and not on it's side or suspended in the air.

Put your sled on a hard surface... either ice, hard pack or your garage floor. Start with the carbide fully retracted and then start extending it. Feel the how much harder it is to turn the adjuster as they extend? See the front end of your sled start rising? Now put your fingers under the skis and try to move the carbide / blade around.

With the weight of the front end and positive pressure on the skis when in motion, the carbides are not moving around when you are riding. They are not moving around and adversely effecting your steering or control. Conversely, I can tell a big difference as the carbide is adjusted depending on the trail conditions.

If you have not actually ridden a sled with TS ski's and compared how they perform against different skis w/ different carbides.... on the same sled and on the same trails with the same conditions, then you are making assumptions more than you are stating facts based on actual riding time.

I am not saying the setup you feel works best for you is not a good one. I am just saying that while the carbides may appear loose from your observations in the garage they are not necessarily accurate and based on your opinion and not actual data. If you have done some of the above and have some time riding with them, then I stand corrected and your experience with them is your experience with them.

My opinion of the TS is just that... an opinion... but my opinion is based on some seat time. I have put over 600 miles on the TS skis and at least compared them to Pilot 5.7's with Bergstrom Triple points on the same trail with the same conditions between two similarly setup sleds. I also run a 4-stroke and I can hear just about every noise the sled is making. You don't hear noise coming from the skis because the carbides are rattling around as you ride. I could hear the sound of the carbides cutting into the pavement when we were running on a road that had thin snow coverage.

I will stand behind my original statement.... I "think" the TS skis will work very well for 80% of the trail riders out there. I have no issue if you fall into the 20% where they won't based on your riding style.
 

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If you actually read what I said i think I answered every one of your questions and basing everything on my opinion which on my sled is the only one that matters. (Also being a bit of a smart ash) I have never ridden on a sled with the TS skis. I only know that those carbides are not solidly mounted and that's a fact. Your sled is not on solid ground all the time nor is any ones. The terrain varies greatly. You want a test, place a broom handle or rock perpendicular to your skis on your hard floor and drive your sled over it and see if the carbide rocks. I bet it does. As I also stated it probably doesn't matter or BRP would not put it on sleds. I also made assumptions as to how these skis will perform on the snow because the bottom profile is very similar to the standard pilot. I absolutely know that the standard pilot skis push when ridden aggressively in loose snow and I would wager that the TS will also. Could I be in the 10/20% of people that this ski will not perform satisfactory, probably. Could I be wrong, sure but its my opinion and $ and until someone I ride with personally leaves me in the dust that didn't previously I will stick with something I know works.

Think snow in central WI preferably ????
 

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Tip your sled on its side or lift it up. push on the front or back of the carbide. They rock back and forth. How many people would run with loose carbides before this design came out. How many people would have purchased any carbide with a 5/16" host bar? Not many. Are any of these observations a big deal, probably not or BRP wouldn't put them on sleds. I typically run shaper or woodys carbides and depending on whats in stock at the time and I have pay between 60 and 90 a set and everybody stocks them not just BRP dealers. I still say these that the actual ski profile has way more to do with feel and performance of a ski that than the amount of host bar sticking below it. No snowcross racing for me, way to old for that but I do enjoy a spirited run from time to time and the Pilot R's perform better than standard pilots with less effort than C&A's. I don't remember when the R'S came out but it was sometime around '08 and I probably have 15K+ miles on them on three different sleds and that's why I sold my TS for something that I know works. I also agree 80-90% of riders would like them and the same riders probably liked the standard pilot also. Look at the profile of a TS and a standard pilot. They are very similar other than the carbide moves. I am glad that the TS is getting good reviews because my next set will probably be for sale also.

think snow.

1eye
How wide are the host bars on the Snowtrackers that so many people run?
 

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I tried your broom handle experiment..... it cut right 80% through the handle when I put it perpendicular to the skis under the first part of the carbides and drove across it. Before I did that I tried rocking the carbides and they did not budge.

But again and to your point...I'm talking about the ~80% of the trail riders out there who aren't aggressive riders. If your worried about your skis being off the ground and breaking skis, then your an aggressive rider and in the 20%.
 

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If you actually read what I said i think I answered every one of your questions and basing everything on my opinion which on my sled is the only one that matters. (Also being a bit of a smart ash) I have never ridden on a sled with the TS skis. I only know that those carbides are not solidly mounted and that's a fact. Your sled is not on solid ground all the time nor is any ones. The terrain varies greatly. You want a test, place a broom handle or rock perpendicular to your skis on your hard floor and drive your sled over it and see if the carbide rocks. I bet it does. As I also stated it probably doesn't matter or BRP would not put it on sleds. I also made assumptions as to how these skis will perform on the snow because the bottom profile is very similar to the standard pilot. I absolutely know that the standard pilot skis push when ridden aggressively in loose snow and I would wager that the TS will also. Could I be in the 10/20% of people that this ski will not perform satisfactory, probably. Could I be wrong, sure but its my opinion and $ and until someone I ride with personally leaves me in the dust that didn't previously I will stick with something I know works.

Think snow in central WI preferably
if you look at the bottom of the ts ski it's more like a 5.7r .not the standard 5.7 .the ts ski with the longer 60 degree runners would make even you change your mind about the ski ,it works,and is adjustable . :wink_old: the std.runners on the ts ski are junk ,period ! 90 degree runners don't bite .
 

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I guess I'm more concerned with the deep channel that I believe cups the snow in loose trails. If there Is enough of it the ski will ride on it and lift the carbide out of the hard pack and create push. Could be bs but that's what happens with other tunnel ski designs I have tried. They work great on hard pack and at cruising speed but when ridden aggressively on enough snow they push and I am not the only one that this happen with. Quite honestly I would always want the carbide fully extended for best performance so being able to adjust them has little bearing on my thoughts. I am not getting off of my sled and adjusting them as trails change. I will however reach back at a stop sign and spin my quick adjust compression as trails dictate. I am just glad there are people that like the TS and there is good reports because I will always have a group to sell to. Maybe I should have tried them first but it's allot harder to sell used skis than new. After all I had to spend almost $700 more to get the quick adjust like my '12 had and after selling the skis it only cost me a couple hundred. Maybe next time but I wasn't willing to wager $700 to find out I still had to buy new skis and try to recoup some cash on used skis that perhaps would get poor reviews.
 

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I guess I'm more concerned with the deep channel that I believe cups the snow in loose trails. If there Is enough of it the ski will ride on it and lift the carbide out of the hard pack and create push. Could be bs but that's what happens with other tunnel ski designs I have tried. They work great on hard pack and at cruising speed but when ridden aggressively on enough snow they push and I am not the only one that this happen with. Quite honestly I would always want the carbide fully extended for best performance so being able to adjust them has little bearing on my thoughts. I am not getting off of my sled and adjusting them as trails change. I will however reach back at a stop sign and spin my quick adjust compression as trails dictate. I am just glad there are people that like the TS and there is good reports because I will always have a group to sell to. Maybe I should have tried them first but it's allot harder to sell used skis than new. After all I had to spend almost $700 more to get the quick adjust like my '12 had and after selling the skis it only cost me a couple hundred. Maybe next time but I wasn't willing to wager $700 to find out I still had to buy new skis and try to recoup some cash on used skis that perhaps would get poor reviews.
it's not a tunnel ski either .only on the outside .the center is like a cat or 57r ski .when you can ,look at one . :wink_old:
 
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