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I recently needed to upgrade from my 12' Triton Clamshell. My criteria was two-fold: the roomiest two-place trailer I could pull behind a mid-sized SUV or mid-sized pickup truck, and to have a tailgate- I'm done dealing with a clamshell cover loaded down with wet snow and ice.

I spent three months casually shopping trailers in the Minneapolis area. I considered everything, and was not brand-specific.

I'm not going to start a trailer war here- buy whatever brand trips your trigger. Having said that, the Triton TC-128 and TC-167 were the final two choices for my needs.

Although it was more money, I ended up buying the TC-167. The primarily reason is because I could actually see behind the trailer with standard mirrors! I towed both before buying. With the TC128, I couldn't see anything behind us. At 102" wide with fully vertical sides, there was no rear visibility at all. Big, ugly towing mirrors would be required. With the TC167, I can look straight down the side of the trailer without needing towing mirrors. The other issue on the test tow was wind resistance- the TC128 pulled like a billboard, as the trailer "footprint" behind the vehicle fully exposed to wind was much larger than the 167. The 167 pulls really nice tucked in behind the tow vehicle. Once settled down at highway speed, our mid-sized SUV can pull it fully loaded while at the same time, rarely kicking out of overdrive. The 128, on the other hand, caused our vehicle to kick in and out of overdrive constantly even when the trailer was empty. The floor is also larger on the TC167- 112 sq. feet vs. 102 sq. feet for the TC128. The extra 10 square feet doesn't sound like much, but imagine a couple of yard sticks laid out in a square and you'll get the picture…

Sleds load staggered. Right sled loads far forward, and left sled loads so that ski's are just behind side entry door. I have two 136" touring Ski Doo's in mine, along with a Mini-Z. All loaded up, there is still plenty of extra room in this trailer. I spent $5 and took it across a truck scale. Loaded as described, the total weight was 2600 lbs, with a tongue weight of 220lbs. The trailer has a 3500 lb axle, and is rated at 2995 lbs gross wt. (without brakes) or 3500 lbs gross wt. (brakes installed). Bottom line is that loaded up, I'm not even close to grossing this trailer out.

Closed up, trailer is 21' long and at 91" high, should fit under an 8' high garage door.

With the sleds loaded, you can see that there is still a ton of room at the forward left corner of the trailer. Same amount of room is at the right-rear of trailer where Mini-Z is parked.

Other niceties:

  1. Galvanized axle. Shouldn't have to worry about axle rust.
  2. Marine plywood. I didn't care for the chipboard I saw in some of the competitors trailers.
  3. Aluminum skin is glued to structure. Look at a competitor's trailer in a 35mph wind with unglued skin and you'll understand why this is important…
  4. Nicer tailgate than most- heavier built and spring-balanced very well. Hook your foot under it and pull- it pops up to hand-level with no effort.
  5. LED lights everywhere. Am beginning to see that on all brands, but nice nonetheless. Two LED floods inside that provide acceptable light at night.
  6. Side entrance door.

This is one of the more expensive two-place trailers in the market. Someone might ask how to justify a TC167 when a larger, three place is just around the corner, price wise. For myself, I don't need a three place trailer, and don't want the full-size vehicle required to pull the 7500 lb three place trailer, either. A six-cylinder SUV or pickup will pull this fine. I also wanted a trailer that can pinch-hit as an enclosed utility trailer for miscellaneous moving needs. This trailer serves both purposes.

I'm not trying to sell anybody one of these trailers- like I said, buy what you want to buy. I'm trying to provide more insight for those of you considering the TC-167.
 

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"The Podiatrist"
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Nice review, same thought I'm having about getting away from a clamshell, mind if I ask what you paid ?

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
These aren't cheap, like I said. Most dealers this year around Minneapolis are in the Mid 5K range new. Used, they are like hen's teeth and tough to find. If it wasn't for an excellent trade-in on my old one, it might not have happened...
 

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"The Podiatrist"
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Thanks, just got a new sled and if I can get rid of the clam, will be pulling the trigger on a trailer before next season. Definitely want the dual functionality like you mentioned. Haven't looked around much yet, hear neo's are pretty nice also. Gotta do some research and visit in person.
Thanks again for giving me some things to think about.

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Nice review.... I went with Triton's TC-228, since I haul 2 Renegades and 2 shorties. I have always been a fan of Triton trailers, just having sold my 3-place open last Winter after 18 years. These hybrids from Triton are great. A little on the high side in price when compared to other manufacturers, but you get the Triton quality. Getting away from the clam shell and going with a TC hybrid type trailer is a great thing. No more shocks to deal with, or tilting the trailer. Like you mentioned, the ramps are built very strong, and make it so much easier loading sleds. You might run into the issue of having the door freeze shut, but I have seen this happen on several other brand enclosed trailers. I try to coat the seal with WD-40, hoping that will keep enough moisture off and keep it from freezing. Although I have seen others carry a small MAP or Butane torch to help melt the ice and get their door/ramp open.

As for the LED lights, I did have some problems with mine. The right side brake light this year(2nd year) was very dim, with only a couple of the LED's lighting up with the running lights on. When I hit the brakes, the light worked fine. While towing, 3 or 4 of the LED's would get better, but still not as bright as the left side. My dealer just sent me new replacements, so I will be changing the right side and the 3rd brake light up top out.

Don't forget to register your warranty on Triton's website. I believe their new warranty is even better now, with 5 years coverage.
 

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Nice review and a nice trailer. Good luck, love the galvanized axle feature. Wonder why it takes them so long to come out with certain features.

Never (fingers crossed) have had an issue with LED lighting.
 

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I purchased the TC-128 this year in Minneapolis. This review is spot-on. I wish I went for the in-line. Paid $4,900 without side door. Can't fit in my garage anyway given height. Still a nice trailer, but the 16 inline is the way to go for most. I can't even see to backup and I am pulling with F150.

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Are Triton trailer skins glued? I thought they were screwed on. I noticed a snowpro that didn't have and screw dents like my triton - looked better. Maybe Triton is glued and screwed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yep- Triton uses both glue and screws.

I briefly touched on this in my first post- One of the days I was out shopping back in January, the wind was absolutely howling, with gusts over 35mph. A really raw, nasty day. I looked at both a 167 and a competitors trailer on the same lot, side by side.

Ever taken a big piece of thin sheetmetal, picked it up and whipped it around? If so you know the kind of weird, "wavy" noise that sheetmetal makes when you do that.

Getting back to that windy day in January- I climbed in the competitors trailer, looked (and heard) the roof and saw the wind rippling right across the unglued roof skin. The roof was making the "wavy" noise I was just describing, only louder as the unglued skin slapped off of the roof structure below it. I wasn't impressed.

30 seconds later I was in the 167 right next to it on the same lot. No noise, and no roof skin movement. I couldn't believe the difference the glued skin made.

Was glad I was out shopping that day- it provided a valuable lesson to me in trailer construction.
 

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Yep- Triton uses both glue and screws.

I briefly touched on this in my first post- One of the days I was out shopping back in January, the wind was absolutely howling, with gusts over 35mph. A really raw, nasty day. I looked at both a 167 and a competitors trailer on the same lot, side by side.

Ever taken a big piece of thin sheetmetal, picked it up and whipped it around? If so you know the kind of weird, "wavy" noise that sheetmetal makes when you do that.

Getting back to that windy day in January- I climbed in the competitors trailer, looked (and heard) the roof and saw the wind rippling right across the unglued roof skin. The roof was making the "wavy" noise I was just describing, only louder as the unglued skin slapped off of the roof structure below it. I wasn't impressed.

30 seconds later I was in the 167 right next to it on the same lot. No noise, and no roof skin movement. I couldn't believe the difference the glued skin made.

Was glad I was out shopping that day- it provided a valuable lesson to me in trailer construction.
I have a tc128 and compared to the competition the Triton is a much nicer trailer. I looked at Blizzard and lightning trailers and they weren't even close to the Triton as far as quality and design. The aerodynamics alone on the Triton are so much better. I did talk to the dealer about trailering and fuel mileage between the 167 and 128 and he said there was very little if any difference. When I towed my 128 at highway speeds I didn't notice any real drag or resistance and it towed beautifully for me.
 
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You think the frame would be sturdy enough to load it with 2 ATVs inline(close to 800lbs each)? I've also been trying to find some exact measurements on the rear door and inside height if you have a few minutes.

I've been eyeing this trailer for a while but I have yet to see one in the flesh.

It's a very nice trailer.

Cheers.
 

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You think the frame would be sturdy enough to load it with 2 ATVs inline(close to 800lbs each)? I've also been trying to find some exact measurements on the rear door and inside height if you have a few minutes.

I've been eyeing this trailer for a while but I have yet to see one in the flesh.

It's a very nice trailer.

Cheers.
Just stuck a tape to it- 76" wide and 63" high on the rear door opening. Same dimension that Triton advertises on their TC series brochure available online. 65" high from floor to underside of roof structure.

Trailer is just shy of 1100lbs empty. Adding 1600lbs for (2) 800lb ATV's would put you around 2700- you'd still have about 300lbs extra for gear. If ordered with (or added) brakes, you are now capable of 3500lbs. With your two ATV's, you'd still have another 800 lbs to go.

Talking about ATV's brings up something else- weight on the tailgate. Realistically, you are rolling at least 1,000 lbs up the tailgate with operator. No question that this tailgate is up for the task. I don't know that I would try that with some of the other tailgates I looked at. If you tweak a tailgate this size, you are gonna be in a world of hurt fast...
 

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Great, thanks for the details, I really appreciate it :)

Sometimes brochures are either optimistic or just plain wrong "printing errors"...
 

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the sides are glued and screwed are they stainless screws? and if they need to be replace are they a pain?
 

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That would be a major flaw and disappointment. They look tough but time will tell. If sides are glued and screwed, not sure why they would break.
 
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