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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been thinking that I have short changed myself with my new trailer, and should have done trailer brakes. I'm not worried about 2 sleds, but I am with my 2 750 pound ATVs (and the possibility of placing a 3rd ATV in my truck bed).

So, a couple of questions-

Never Adjust vs manual adjust? I only have one 3500 pound galvanized axle. I don't see galvanized brakes as an option (unless I go hydraulic). So, how long do they last in the salt?

Brake Controller-Tekonsha Prodigy P3? Seems to be the best.

So far just thinking outloud.

Thanks!
 

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life is short, live long
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What are you pulling it with? Generally, under 4-5k brakes are optional. That said, if you're towing with a small car, then add brakes.
 

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life is short, live long
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Just reread. You have a pickup. As long as it's not a Honda Ridgeline or similar, you'll be fine. Extra weight in the bed will actually help with trailer control. No worries.
 

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1500lbs won't be a problem unless you're pulling with a smart car.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I decided to do it! I can get 3 ATV's in my trailer (at least looks so), and one in the bed. Ordered all genuine Dexter brake parts and a tekonsha prodigy P3.

Decided to use the manual adjust. Saw some threads here that the brakes need to be checked and cleaned each year after salt, so why pay extra for nevr-adjust since I have it open anyway?
 

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My trailer came with the Dexter NevRAdjust drum brakes on all four wheels and so far, I really like them. I have been using the trailer year round so any rust issues might be lessened due to them not sitting at all for the spring, summer and fall.

I also have the Tekonsha P3 and it too is perfect.
 

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I have the Dexter Never adjust on the trailer and like them. Just remember, never adjust does not mean never require maintenance.

Salt is a killer on everything these days and everything seems to be made thinner ( backing plates )
 

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I have been using the trailer year round so any rust issues might be lessened due to them not sitting at all for the spring, summer and fall.
This is huge. They all rust. But year round use prevents moving parts from seizing tight. And driving thru a good rainstorm helps clean out salt. Whereas my trailer gets parked all summer. Despite a good cleaning, salt dust is surely in the brakes. A summer of humidity mixed with salty steel = seized springs and threads and levers. So every fall I pull apart and beat them all free with a hammer or whatever to get them moving, then they're good for the rest of winter with frequent use. Just part of the routine...
 

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This is huge. They all rust. But year round use prevents moving parts from seizing tight. And driving thru a good rainstorm helps clean out salt. Whereas my trailer gets parked all summer. Despite a good cleaning, salt dust is surely in the brakes. A summer of humidity mixed with salty steel = seized springs and threads and levers. So every fall I pull apart and beat them all free with a hammer or whatever to get them moving, then they're good for the rest of winter with frequent use. Just part of the routine...
No doubt, the use of the (enclosed) trailer, for the dirtbikes, all spring, summer and fall, helps to keep everything working and yes again, between the rain, and that I did plug up the not-needed adjuster holes in the backing plates helps keep the salt water out in the winter.
 

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life is short, live long
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This is huge. They all rust. But year round use prevents moving parts from seizing tight. And driving thru a good rainstorm helps clean out salt. Whereas my trailer gets parked all summer. Despite a good cleaning, salt dust is surely in the brakes. A summer of humidity mixed with salty steel = seized springs and threads and levers. So every fall I pull apart and beat them all free with a hammer or whatever to get them moving, then they're good for the rest of winter with frequent use. Just part of the routine...
Why wait till fall?
 
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