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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm curious what torque wrench recommendations any of you might have. I'm seeing quite a variety in the stores... in/lbs, ft/lbs, etc.
I'd prefer to get just one, but will that cover the range of torque specs I'll commonly find on the sled? Or do I need more than one?
 

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Precision instruments makes a nice clicker unit. I have a 3/8 drive range 0-100 ft/lb, and a 1/2 in drive 50-250 ft/lb. Precision instruments makes these same units for snap-on, so they are excellent quality, made in the USA, and a lot cheaper without the snap-on logo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the very helpful input guys!
 

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Beam type torque wrenches are best for the average person. They never go out of calibration and never need to be re calibrated.They are also cheap as dirt. Buy a small inch # craftsman and a ft # craftsman. A ft # is too much for the small 6mm bolts.

They may not be a cool as a clicker but you never have to question the accuracy.
 

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Precision instruments makes a nice clicker unit. I have a 3/8 drive range 0-100 ft/lb, and a 1/2 in drive 50-250 ft/lb. Precision instruments makes these same units for snap-on, so they are excellent quality, made in the USA, and a lot cheaper without the snap-on logo.
Where do you order precision instruments from?
 

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Beam type torque wrenches are best for the average person. They never go out of calibration and never need to be re calibrated.They are also cheap as dirt. Buy a small inch # craftsman and a ft # craftsman. A ft # is too much for the small 6mm bolts.

They may not be a cool as a clicker but you never have to question the accuracy.
I always wondered how accurate they were. I've almost bought one on multiple occasions because they are dirt cheap. I take it from your experience they are fairly accurate then? Would you trust it enough to rebuild a ski doo engine?
 

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Plenty accurate. Frankly I'd trust an "old" beam style wrench much more than I'd trust a cheapo Harbor Freight clicker/digital style anyday. And it keeps you in the sub-$100 range by a long shot too. Something in a 3/8" drive like this is perfect for most things on a snowmobile:
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00944978000P?sid=IDx20070921x00003a&ci_src=14110944&ci_sku=00944978000P

And yes, I have, and will continue to, rebuild engines and most anything else with one like this...

And if I drop it, or drop KICK it, it will survive. Not necessarily true for some of the digital units.

Just understand that the "loose" handle on the beam wrenches is by design, and important to understand how to use that pivot in the handle to get an accurate reading. You need to make sure that rocking handle is held parallel the bar...don't let it kick over in either direction or it gives you an inaccurate reading. You'll understand what I mean after you own one...it's not brain surgery or anything...

And if you want to buy two, no doubt a 1/4" drive would also be handier for getting into tigher spots and getting better accuracy on the 0 to 15 ft pound range...but not critical.

And for cars and wheel lug nuts, etc, that's where the 1/2" drive units will come into play. About the only thing you might want a 1/2" drive unit on a snowmobile would probably be the primary clutch bolt. And maybe rear axle or suspension bolts or similar.

There is certainly a reason they make multiple sizes, but if you only want to buy one, I say any 0-75 or 0-100 lb unit that is in your budget will cover 98% of what you need on a snowmobile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
And if you want to buy two, no doubt a 1/4" drive would also be handier for getting into tigher spots and getting better accuracy on the 0 to 15 ft pound range...but not critical.
Yeah, there does seem to be a fair amount of specs that are lbf*in...
 

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Sled work you should have two, a bigger ft lb model in 1/2 " drive for clutches and flywheel nuts. And then a smaller 3/8 " drive in inch lbs for engine work on head bolts etc.

Good Luck
 

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Where do you order precision instruments from?
I got mine from the tool warehouse.net. Found my receipt I paid $122 for the 3/8 drive and $164 for the 1/2 drive back in 2008. These are the split beam type with the side dial/lock, and they don't need to be dialed down after use. They come with a calibration certificate and plastic case. I've been very happy with mine and use them all the time. They do have advantages over the simple, cheaper beam type, since you don't have to look at the needle, which can be difficult if not impossible in when used in hard to reach areas. Just listen for and feel the click. My brother has the exact same wrenches only his say Snapon and come in the red box instead of black. His are 15-20 years old, and he sent them in to be calibrated a couple years ago, which is part of the reason I bought mine. I remember him saying they were within 1 or 2% across the range, which is still extremely accurate for a precision tool of that age, which sees use in a commercial garage. It all depends on how much you use them and how much you are willing to spend. If treated with care they should remain calibrated quite accurate for several years.
 

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Royal Distributing sells some inexpensive click types. I have an inch-lb one from them and a ft-lb one from Canadian Tire, a Mastercraft Maximum work of art (both also read in metric torque units). Had I known Royal sells them so cheap I would have got the ft-lb one from them too. Maybe beam type are more durable but I just take care not to drop/ding them and keep dirt out of them. They both came in a case with proof of calibration, but I never thought about ever re-calibrating since I don't use them much and I baby them. I had another one that some kids got ahold of and played with it until rendering it useless, which was very annoying. The in-lb one is nice for most fasteners since its a lot lighter and shorter. I used to own the el cheapo beam type but always worried about their accuracy since it didn't read on zero when at rest, plus as someone else mentioned, you can't go by sound/feel but have to be looking 90 degrees to the scale to read the pointer location. That said, I rebuilt a 462 liquid top and bottom with one of those and it was fine. Of course it may have been fine just going by feel too so that may not mean much.
 
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