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Here is some updated and further verified electrical information for these machines - at the moment some of these only apply to the four strokes, as the ETEC and 550 have a totally different wiring harness. Other mods in here will work on nearly any Doo, or even other brands. Check the description to see what it "fits". Generally, the two strokes have a much simpler wiring harness and fuse box, and you just add axillary circuits to do what you need to do instead. Descriptions for the aux circuits will work on any machine with wires and a battery (or no battery and add a rectifier)

Update 11/14/14: Newer Doo's are now running what I'm going to call a Gen II button module, the handlebar mounted switch module for the start button, high beams, thumb/hand warmers, and mode and set buttons on some of the machines. This is different wiring from the old Gen I button module that was used on everything for many years. Looks at the post applications for the right generation button module before going too far. See part 2 for a description and photos of Gen I versus Gen II button modules

Update 12/17/14: Have been unable to remove this thread from the FAQs so I can add to it, so there is now two parts, see list below.

As I've mentioned in other electrical posts, it is worth noting, both for this and future posts I'm going to make, you should be comfortable and have some basic electrical skills and knowledge to perform these tasks. They are pretty straightforward, but short circuiting a battery or wire could cause all sorts or messes, so these are purely my examples and if you choose to try them, you do so at your own risk. Some of this is reposted from the Skandic XU mods pages ( http://www.dootalk.c...oxes-etc/page-2 ), other info is new

Here is some of the (electrical) modifications I have tackled that will be listed in subsequent posts.

Part 1: first thread, this one

  1. Using the existing horn circuit on WT/SWTs to power aux lighting, outlets, heated visor, heated bag, or a horn (most Yeti II and XU Skandics/Expy)
  2. Using the existing rear outlet circuit on WT/SWTs to power aux lighting, outlets,etc. (most Yeti II and XU Skandics/Expy)
  3. Modifying the fuse box so outlet and hand warmers run at idle (2011 - 2014 600 ACE WT/SWT)
  4. Modifying the fuse box so outlet and hand warmers run at idle (2011 - 2014 600 ACE Expy Sport / Tundra, likely other ACEs in XPs)
  5. How to access the temperature gauge in the standard gauge pod (2011 - 2014 liquid Skidoo with standard gauges)
  6. Adding an independent aux circuit (that is only active when machine is running) to power lighting, heaters, and other gadgets (Nearly any sled, ACE Expy Sp and SWT shown)
  7. Adding a switch to shut down the factory headlight (Nearly any Gen I sled, ACE SWT shown with Gen I button module - See part 2 for directions on sleds with the Gen II module)

Part 2: - second thread, found here: http://www.dootalk.com/forums/topic/965674-skandic-expedition-and-others-wiring-and-electrical-part-2/

  1. Description of Gen I versus Gen II hand/thumb warmer & start button modules
  2. Adding a second battery, jumpstart, and winch harness (Nearly any sled, ACE SWT shown)
  3. Adding a dash heater / windshield defroster (Nearly any sled, V-800 TUV, ACE Expy Sp, and SWT shown)
  4. Electric (120V AC) engine pre-heater options (600 ACE)(
  5. How to remove the gauge console (All newer Doo's)
  6. Field tip - bypass a problematic start button (Gen I button module)
  7. Field tip - bypass a problematic start button (Gen II button module)
  8. Adding a switch to shut down the factory headlights (Doo's with Gen II button module)
  9. Using the existing console circuit to add a 12V outlet and/or aux lights (XS Chassis Expy sport, likely other XS and XMs)
  10. Options for making thumb and hand warmers work at idle (All Doo's with Gen II button module


  11. extra


  12. Lighting discussions (any sled really..)


  13. extra


  14. extra


  15. extra


  16. extra


  17. Sources for inexpensive Ski-doo replacement relays, wire, connectors, lighting, plugs, and other goodies.

More to come as research and input from others continues.. (Continuous work in progress, may take a while to get all these posts up)
 

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1 - Using the existing horn circuit on WT/SWTs to power aux lighting, outlets, heated visor, heated bag, or a horn.

Images shown are from 2011 to 2013 SWT's.

This one is pretty simple.

I'm not certain the extent of it, but it seems at least the XU chassis machines made in Finland come equipped wired for a horn. I've heard that the horn is required and is standard equipment in Europe. In North America, we can use this existing circuit (which has nothing on it) to power an axillary device (or add a horn). It even has it's own fuse in the fusebox and everything. Some of the Yeti chassis machine already have the button too.

Two simple options exist. Jumper the HB1 and HB2 connectors together, making the horn circuit live whenever the machine is running. Or, wire HB1 and HB2 to a switch or button that the user can activate (circuit still shuts off when the machine is off). If you have a Yeti chassis machine, some are already set up with the button. You can still trace the wires out and connect them together, or to a switch if you like, I don't recall where exactly to find the wire connections on the Yeti chassis.

IMG_1644.JPG

Locate HB1 and HB2 in your wiring harness. On the XU chassis machines (at least the four strokes) the two wires come out of the same bundle as the DESS cord plug. You might not even need to remove the console, but it offers more work space.

IMG_1649.JPG

I added a small extension of wire to the HB1 and HB2 connectors. This gives me a little more room to attach to a switch next to the gauge pod. Connectors are standard 1/2" male and female quick connects for HB1/HB2 as well as for the switch I used.

IMG_1650.JPG

If you don't need/want the switch, you can just jumper HB1 and HB2. Then the circuit will be live whenever the machine is running. This picture is actually for the rear outlet connection, but one could make a jumper just like this for HB1 to HB2.

IMG_1651.JPG

Apparently I didn't get a picture of the horn connector before I cut the plug off. On XU's, it on the front right side of the frame below the coolant bottle. On Yeti chassis, it's in the left front corner of the tub. Wire colors are gray w/ yellow stripe for positive and black for negative. Unless you are installing a Ski-doo OEM horn, just cut the black plastic plug off, and connect your axillary circuit to these wires. If you are putting in outlets or plugs, you can run the new wires back to the console from here, or it's already in a great location for auxiliary lights.

Check your fuse box, mine already had a 5 amp fuse in place even though the circuit wasn't used. The wiring can easily handle 15 amps, I put in a 10 amp which was plenty for my LEDs. The only power draw consideration is to not overload the "load" relay in the fuse box which provides power to several circuits (lights, taillights, outlet). Unless you are drawing 15 amps on the horn circuit and 15 amps on the outlet circuit it will be fine.

That's it!
 

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2 - Using the existing rear outlet circuit on WT/SWTs to power aux lighting, outlets,etc.

Equally as easy to activate the rear outlet circuit. This one you don't have to take apart the console to access the wires. Read the previous post on the horn wiring, much of the procedures will be the same.

IMG_1647.JPG

Locate RPSW1 and RPSW2 - they will be sticking out of the main wiring harness on the right side of the chassis where the harness heads up to the console and gauge pod. If anyone knows what this 3 wire weather-pack plug is for, I'd be curious to find out (it's not the compass/premium gauge module plug, that's up in the dash). As with the horn, you can wire these to a switch or jumper them.

IMG_1650.JPG

jumpered...

photo.JPG

Once jumpered or hooked to a switch, this plug under the rear seat will be live when the machine is running. It could be wired to a back-up/work light, rear outlet, heated bag, etc.. As with the horn, you will likely have to cut the plug off and use butt splice connectors to crimp to the wires. Check the fuse box to make sure there is a 5-10 amp or so fuse in there for the rear outlet.
 

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3 - Modifying the fuse box so outlet and hand warmers run at idle (600 ACE WT/SWT)

The stock configuration of the 600 ACE powered machines shut off the hot grips, thumb warmer, and electrical outlet below 2000 rpm or so. This is especially annoying when you want your grips to warm up a little bit at -40, or you have a GPS plugged in.. For a while, we didn't realize our machines were doing this, and wondered why our grips would be like ice as soon as we stopped and idled.. I think the reason for this is not to conserve power, but perhaps that the charging system is so robust and the battery large, that if idled unattended for a while with hot grips or thumb on high they could get too hot. So keep an eye on this potential if you do this mod. Since I started doing these in the fall of 2012, I haven't had anything melt or even get close.

I've successfully done 9 machines now with no issues, 4 2013 SWT ACE's, a 2012 SWT ACE, a 2011 WT ACE, 2 2011 Tundra Ace's, and a 2011 Expy Sport ACE. All the wiring color codes are same for these models, but it is best to double check with a meter and jumper before cutting them.. This mod is for the Gen I button module, it does not work on the new Gen II button module with the variable warmers, I'm still working on a fix for those.

The rewiring is done on the coil/trigger side of the relay, so the modified wiring is not carrying any excessive current or changing the fusing in the box. To put it simply, the ECU turns on the Orange wire with a Green stripe when the machine starts and idles. This powers up the first load relay, turning on your head and tailight circuits. The ECU does not power up the second wire, the Orange wire with a White stripe, until the machine is around 2000 rpm. We will cut the Orange/White wire, and splice it into the Orange/Green wire, so the ECU now powers up both relays when the machine starts. Make sense?

It is good to note that these circuits powering the coil/trigger of the relay are a switched ground, if you poke around the relay terminals you will find the positive is always hot. I like to double check that I am cutting the right wires, by pulling the two load relays in question, then making a short wire with 1/8" male quick connect terminals on both ends. You can use this as a jumper, with the machine off, connecting in the front of the fuse box the two terminals which are numbered 30 and 87 on the back of the relays. If you connect these together with the jumper, either your lights will come on or your outlet and grips will. The back side of the thumb warmer heats up really quick, that's a good one to check..

Now it is time to remove the fuse box. Pry the two tabs out on either side releasing the latch that holds it in place. Pull it out as much as you can, these machines vary with how much slack they have in the harness. I found it helpfull to unplug the speedometer sensor wire on the opposite side of the machine and unhook the tab securing it to the gearbox to get a little more slack in the harness. Pull firmly on the harness to get it out as far as you can, there is not a lot of room. I also cut back the fabric wrap around the harness a couple inches, and it helps to cut the zip tie back there too.

Now you can compare the front of the fuse box to the back, and carefully match up the wires on the back to the contacts on the front. The couple that you experimented with jumpering are the two sets of load contacts that carry the current to the lights and outlets. These are slightly bigger than the control wires. The two sets of control wires coming out of the same relay block will be the ones you'll be doing surgery on. I don't recall what color the positive side was, purpleish something, but the ones you need should be Orange/white and orange/green. If everything agrees so far, you should be on the right track.

Cut the Orange/white wire as far back into the harness as possible, which will give you the most length to work with coming from the fuse box. Gently pull on just the Orange/green wire, I was able to get several more inches of it to come out of the harness. Cut this one (Orange/green) with enough length on both sides of the cut to get a butt splice connector on. the first couple times I didn't cut this wire, but spliced to it instead. I actually think the connection is a lot more solid and reliable if you cut it. Now I crimp a butt splice on the harness side of the Orange/green, then crimped a short 6" or so extension wire onto it to give myself a little working room. I've had good results with good quality butt splices like the ones Polar Wire sells, then covered with some good quality adhesive heat shrink. On the end of the extension wire, crimp another splice, slide on some heat shrink before you complete the loop, then crimp it to both the Orange/green and Orange/white wires coming out of the back of the fusebox. You'll need to strip these wires a little longer than normal to get a good crimp with them both in the same end of the butt splice, and twist the strands together, but this works fine. I used a 14-16 gauge crimp here, since the two wires "become" a bigger wire. My extension wire was also 16 or 18 gauge. Make sure all your connections are snug and secure, and that's about it!

Behind the fuse box there is a little tiny piece of split loom, protecting the wires from an aluminum corner, but there is nothing to keep the loom in place. I imagine it falling off at some point, even without making any of these mods. I instead stuffed some soft foam behind the box to protect the wire bundle from chafing on the aluminum edges, seems like that will work better. I added a few zip ties too to bundle everything together again.

O-W XU.jpg

Orange/White wire. Cut this one as far back in to the harness as possible, to give ourself a little working room on the fuse box side of the wire. You won't need to do anything with the other end, just leave it tucked inside the wire bundle.

O-G XU.jpg

Orange/Green wire. Pull on this on gently to see if you can get a few more inches to come out of the main harness. Cut this one in the middle, you will need to crimp a splice on both ends of it.

Splice XU.jpg

Now, on the fuse box side, strip about 1/2" off the wires and slide both White/Orange and White/Green into a good quality butt splice and crimp it. Attach a short 4-6" peice of quality 16-18AWG wire to the other end and crimp. If you have heat shrink or heat shrink butt splices, slide a peice over and seal them. Slide a second heat shrink on, then crimp the extension wire back to the other end of the Orange/Green wire and heat shrink them too.

relay XU.jpg

Here is the back side of the relay. When testing your circuits, you can jump (on the fuse box) terminals 30 and 87. Note that these are NOT the wires you will cut, you just want to verify you are on the right relay (I haven't seen one that isn't, all the color codes of the wires have been consistent). Note that the relay can go back in right side up or upside down, 30 and 87 still stay in opposing corners so it doesn't matter.

IMG_1579.JPG

Testing for the right circuit by jumping the relay. (Tundra shown, but concept is the same)
 

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4 - Modifying the fuse box so outlet and hand warmers run at idle (600 ACE Expy Sport / Tundra, likely other ACE powered machines in the XP chassis)

Nearly identical to the XU wiring, pictures are a little different.

The stock configuration of the 600 ACE powered machines shut off the hot grips, thumb warmer, and electrical outlet below 2000 rpm or so. This is especially annoying when you want your grips to warm up a little bit at -40, or you have a GPS plugged in.. For a while, we didn't realize our machines were doing this, and wondered why our grips would be like ice as soon as we stopped and idled.. I think the reason for this is not to conserve power, but perhaps that the charging system is so robust and the battery large, that if idled unattended for a while with hot grips or thumb on high they could get too hot. So keep an eye on this potential if you do this mod. Since I started doing these in the fall of 2012, I haven't had anything melt or even get close.

I've successfully done 9 machines now with no issues, 4 2013 SWT ACE's, a 2012 SWT ACE, a 2011 WT ACE, 2 2011 Tundra Ace's, and a 2011 Expy Sport ACE. All the wiring color codes are same for these models, but it is best to double check with a meter and jumper before cutting them.. This mod is for the Gen I button module, it does not work on the new Gen II button module with the variable warmers, I'm still working on a fix for those.

The rewiring is done on the coil/trigger side of the relay, so the modified wiring is not carrying any excessive current or changing the fusing in the box. To put it simply, the ECU turns on the Orange wire with a Green stripe when the machine starts and idles. This powers up the first load relay, turning on your head and tailight circuits. The ECU does not power up the second wire, the Orange wire with a White stripe, until the machine is around 2000 rpm. We will cut the Orange/White wire, and splice it into the Orange/Green wire, so the ECU now powers up both relays when the machine starts. Make sense?

It is good to note that these circuits powering the coil/trigger of the relay are a switched ground, if you poke around the relay terminals you will find the positive is always hot. I like to double check that I am cutting the right wires, by pulling the two load relays in question, then making a short wire with 1/8" male quick connect terminals on both ends. You can use this as a jumper, with the machine off, connecting in the front of the fuse box the two terminals which are numbered 30 and 87 on the back of the relays. If you connect these together with the jumper, either your lights will come on or your outlet and grips will. The back side of the thumb warmer heats up really quick, that's a good one to check..

Now it is time to remove the fuse box. Remove the two screws holding the two little fuse boxes in place. Remove the little panel around the reverse lever. On the Tundra, unplug the main connector going into the ECU under the console. Cut back the fabric wrap around the harness a couple inches and cut any zip ties preventing the harness from giving some slack.

Now you can compare the front of the fuse box to the back, and carefully match up the wires on the back to the contacts on the front. The couple that you experimented with jumpering are the two sets of load contacts that carry the current to the lights and outlets. These are slightly bigger than the control wires. The two sets of control wires coming out of the same relay block will be the ones you'll be doing surgery on. I don't recall what color the positive side was, purpleish something, but the ones you need should be Orange/white and orange/green. If everything agrees so far, you should be on the right track.

Cut the Orange/white wire as far back into the harness as possible, which will give you the most length to work with coming from the fuse box. Gently pull on just the Orange/green wire, I was able to get several more inches of it to come out of the harness. Cut this one (Orange/green) with enough length on both sides of the cut to get a butt splice connector on. the first couple times I didn't cut this wire, but spliced to it instead. I actually think the connection is a lot more solid and reliable if you cut it. Now I crimp a butt splice on the harness side of the Orange/green, then crimped a short 6" or so extension wire onto it to give myself a little working room. I've had good results with good quality butt splices like the ones Polar Wire sells, then covered with some good quality adhesive heat shrink. On the end of the extension wire, crimp another splice, slide on some heat shrink before you complete the loop, then crimp it to both the Orange/green and Orange/white wires coming out of the back of the fusebox. You'll need to strip these wires a little longer than normal to get a good crimp with them both in the same end of the butt splice, and twist the strands together, but this works fine. I used a 14-16 gauge crimp here, since the two wires "become" a bigger wire. My extension wire was also 16 or 18 gauge. Make sure all your connections are snug and secure, and that's about it!

Re-mount everything, and replace any zip ties that were cut. If needed, add some replacement loom or tape where the wrap was cut and un-done.

IMG_1579.JPG

Testing which relay is which.

IMG_1582.JPG

Get some slack in the harness (horrible picture, sorry..)

IMG_1583.JPG

May be helpful to unplug the ECU on the Tundra. I didn't have to on the Expy Sport. There is a weird button and cam on the back of this plug to release it.

IMG_1586.JPG

Orange/white wire. Unwrap the harness so you cut this back in a ways to have something to work with.

A few more pics in the next post, reached my max for this one.
 

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4 continued - Modifying the fuse box so outlet and hand warmers run at idle (600 ACE Expy Sport / Tundra, likely other ACE powered machines in the XP chassis)

Continued pictures

IMG_1587.JPG

Orange green wire. Cut this one so you can splice to both ends of it.

IMG_1590.JPG

Ready to splice together. As with the others, I used a short extension wire to keep plenty of slack in the crimped wires.

IMG_1591.JPG

Orange/Green and Orange/White stripped and ready to be crimped together in a butt splice. Add an extension wire, some heat shrink to seal it up, and splice it back to the Orange/Green coming out of the harness. Put it back together and you're done!
 

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AvalanchAK you are GREAT!!! The one thing I didn't like about my ACE was no handwarmers at idle. I use it quite a bit ice fishing and it sure is nice after winding up a tipup with wet hands to have warm handwarmers to put your hands on! Thanks for the post!!!
 

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5 - How to access the temperature gauge in the standard gauge pod (probably works on any liquid Skidoo with standard gauges)

Need more feedback on what machines this works on, definitely works on the ACE SWT and WTs, and I think I used it on the ACE Expy Sport too. I'd imagine this would work on any liquid cooled Doo with the standard gauge package, let me know what does and doesn't and I can edit.

Discovered this by accident, and none of the Dealers here in Interior Alaska knew about it.

With the machine running, scroll to odometer mode on the gauge. Press and hold the button (just like you were resetting a trip meter, except you are in Odometer) and it will change the fuel gauge to a temperature gauge. Press and hold again to flip back.
 
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6 - Adding an independent aux circuit (that is only active when machine is running) to power lighting, heaters, and other gadgets - with minor variations this will work on nearly any machine

This is pretty simple, and can be done dozens of different ways. It may be overkill information for some, but hopefully it proves handy for someone. The basic premise, is to pull power directly off the battery or hot side of the starter solenoid, immediately run it through a fuse, then to terminal 30 on a relay. The coil contacts of the relay, 85 and 86; one is run to ground (does not matter which one) and the other is your "trigger" wire, run to the positive lead of a headlight, tailight, or outlet wire, or any other circuit that comes live when the machine is started. This trigger wire will only draw milliamps to activate the relay, so it can be tapped in to any circuit. The power for the the AUX circuit will come directly from the battery connection. 12V positive for your AUX circuit(s) will come off of terminal 87 on the relay, and negative can be connected anywhere to the chassis ground.

Other than removing the gauge cluster and the machines side panel, no major dissasembly is needed on the XU chassis, as well as most machines. It may be convenient to pop off the windshield. I mount the relay typically between the transmission and coolant bottle on the frame, where the starter solenoid is nearby, and the trigger wire can be passed up into the console behind the gauges.

(Update: On my newest machine, 2015 Expy 1200 SE, I mounted the relay inside the console next to the fan and switches I added. This worked out to be cleaner, 90% of the wiring stays inside the console and there is only a couple running out to the chassis. Makes disassembly of the machine easier, particularly in the field..)

A standard 12 volt automotive VF4 "cube" relay works well, as they are inexpensive and easily obtained at any auto parts store. I buy mine from Digi-Key, but I use a lot of them (see component sources post coming later). It's nice to use a relay base (also from Digi-Key) so the relay can be unplugged from a socket, it makes the installation a lot cleaner and you can bolt/rivet the base to the chassis. But you can also just wire directly to the relay using .25" quick connect terminals. If you don't use a base, select a relay with a mounting tab so you can secure it to the chassis.

To find the headlight power wire to tap for the trigger connection, remove the gauge pod and locate the headlight wire before it goes to the Hi/Lo beam switch, where it is always live when the machine is running. (You can also cut this wire and run both ends to a switch, giving you the ability to turn off the headlights.)

The wire is pretty easy to find. Pop out the gauge cluster, and behind it in the dash is the main wiring harness. One of the big wide plugs comes out of the main harness, and goes into a nylon sheathed bundle that goes up the handlebars. This is the bundle you are looking for. I prefer to tap into the wire on the main harness side of the plug, and the wire color varies depending on which side you look at. Referencing the pictures below, look for the yellow wire with the red stripe coming out of the main harness in the middle of the plug. On the handlebar side of the plug, the wire is purplish red with an orange stripe. On some of our machines, I tapped in a splice just to power up an auxillary relay, on others I cut the wire and ran to a headlight on/off switch as well as the aux relay. It's always good to double check before you cut though, with the connector unplugged, you can start the machine and put a voltmeter on the main harness side of the plug. The right wire will have +13VDC (or thereabouts) when the machine is running.

One thing to consider when doing this kind of wiring is how the machine dissasembles. It's good to use plugs or some kind of quick disconnect so the dash, hood parts, and airbox can be removed without having to cut a bunch of zip ties and pull wires out. Wiring and colors shown below will be the the same on all machines, these are XU and XP chassis. Other machines will be the same concept though.

2 tapped.jpg

Headlight wire tapped to power the trigger coil of the relay. These little circuit tapper connectors seem to work pretty well.

3 backside.jpg

Same wire on the handlebar side of the connector/plug. Note the different color.

Expy relay.jpg

Relay mounted in an Expy Sport, using a relay base. If the relay fails or I want to disable the circuit, I can just unplug the relay. Note the fused circuit coming from the battery below it.

1 cube relay&plug.jpg

Relay mounted in a Super Wide, no relay base. Here the 1/4" guick connect terminals connect directly to the relay. A little uglier, but perfectly functional.

I need to add a pic or two here of the new wiring layout on the Expy SE..

View attachment Basic Skidoo Aux circuit.pdf

Here is the basic schematic for adding this circuit. Trigger and ground wire 85 and 86 can be essentially any size, Polar Wire 18 gauge works well. For the power wire to number 30 and from 87 to your accessories, depending on how much current the added items will draw, use a 14 gauge wire or so. 14 gauge Polar Wire is good up to 38 amps, lower grade wire will be less.
 

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7 - Adding a switch to shut down the factory headlights (Nearly any sled, ACE SWT and Expy SP ACE shown with Gen I button module - See Gen II wiring at #13)

(Edit 11/15/2016 - Go here for details on what wire to look for on the Gen II button module, as well as item #13 in these FAQs.)

http://www.dootalk.com/forums/topic/1332674-2015-skandic-lights-out/

Here is how to find the headlight power wire, before it goes to the Hi/Lo beam switch where it is always live when the machine is running. You can cut this wire and run both ends to a switch, giving you the ability to turn off the headlights.

A headlight on/off switch can be handy for several uses, at night when breaking trail the stock headlight gets covered with snow and reflects back in the drivers eyes. Turning it off and using a helmet mounted LED light works much better. Could also be handy for hunting or stealth mode, when you are just firing it up in the middle of the night at -50 to keep it warm, want to have the maximum amount of electrical power available, etc..

The wire is pretty easy to find. Pop out the gauge cluster, and behind it in the dash is the main wiring harness. There are two small slots in the top of the gauge, push small flathead screwdrivers or similar into these to release the tabs holding the gauge cluster in. Roll it out towards the handlebar and unplug it. One of the big wide plugs comes out of the main harness, and goes into a nylon sheathed bundle that goes up the handlebars. This is the bundle you are looking for. I prefer to tap into the wire on the main harness side of the plug, and the wire color varies depending on which side you look at.

Referencing the pictures below, look for the yellow wire with the red stripe coming out of the main harness. On the handlebar side of the plug, the wire is purplish red with an orange stripe. It's always good to double check before you cut though, but in this instance I'm not sure of a procedure to verify that this is the headlight power wire. Without special tools to remove the single wire from the plug, it's hard to know without cutting it. On the plus side, it's in an easy location to splice. In any case, this is the correct wire on my '13/'12 SWTs and '11 Expy SP.

Consider where you will want your headlight on/off switch. Use a decent quality one so it doesn't give you problems later. If mounting on the handlebars somewhere, I would cut and splice into the wire on the handlebar side of the plug. If the switch is on the console, as mine are, I cut and spliced in to the main harness side of the connector, Cut the wire, add an appropriate amount of extension wire on the each end of the cut wires. Use a good butt splice and heat shrink to seal it, and connect the two wires to your switch. Viola!

4 w sheath.jpg

Here is the wire cut, and extension wires added to run to the switch.

3 backside.jpg

Cut this one instead if you want your switch on the handlebar side.
 

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Samoyed,

I haven't done too much measuring since I haven't had any charging issues, but initially I did do some tests and was very pleased.

On my ACE SWT, with the engine off, I fired up:

70 watts of LED

44 watts - heated bag and heated water bottle

10 watts roughly - 2 GPS

10 watts - 2 USB camera chargers

If I remember correctly, with the machine off, I was losing about 11 amps from the battery at 12.6 volts through my DC clamp-on meter.

I fired the machine up, which added:

120 watts or so of factory headlights

50 watts or so for handwarmers and thumb

plus other power for tailight, engine management, etc.

Without revving the engine, I was immediatly getting a battery charge, and after about 10 minutes of steady idle I was still maintaining a charge to the battery while powering a load of roughly 300 watts (22 amps).

As a Renewable Energy specialist, I'm pretty particular about taking care of my batteries and such, and never have had any reason to suspect that my battery was getting abused. Since I added several outlets to my dash, I plugged one of these into an outlet, which is quite handy to keep an eye on things.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0085GVX8E/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's good data to have when cold starting, or leaving things running with the machine off. We'll run the LEDs with the engine off at night while setting up camp sometimes, and I'll typically leave my heated bags and chargers on during lunch and daytime stops when it's cold..

All in all, its definitely a robust charging system. We even jump-started a pickup off one of our machines.
 

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Any thoughts or ways of disabling the DESS.

We had trouble with this in the bush, and although the machine satrted it would not move (BEEP BEEP BEEP)

Eventually, by wiggling the "key" around we finally got the beep to stop and the machine to move. The dealer replaced the "key and button"...they said you cannot disable. This sucks becuse our sleds are rarely stolen and are used 100 plus miles in the bush...long walk or tow back home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't think that would be very easy. I'm sure it's "doable" in some sense, but probably not easy or cheap. The DESS acts the same way an immobilizer chip acts in most cars nowadays. Very difficult to bypass, although if you have a car that aftermarketers build "chip tunes" for you can usually get an immobilizer delete in your tune (of course an EGR delete too while your at it). With the Skidoo DESS and BUDS, you'd essentially need the same thing, a "tuned" ECM. Don't know of anyone who does that. Fortunately, I haven't had any problems, other than frequent beeps at startup, wiggle the key, and you're OK. That's pretty common. I think the underlying system is pretty robust as long as your don't lose your key(s), (I always carry a spare). If the DESS craps out, it's more likely the ECM crapped out in actuality and you're still hosed.. I'm in the same boat too, way out in the boonies if something does go out.

While I know that DESS cords failing and ECMs going out do happen, I think overall the machines are way more reliable than those of the past, even with the new systems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
With that in mind though, I should probably figure out how to bypass the start button to start a machine from the main wiring harness plug as a backcountry workaround. That button has caused a few problems for folks.. Unless someone has already figured out how??
 
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