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I find it interesting how you are so certain it's the ignition when it appears to be working fine, and totally disregard missing gaskets.
Who knows, you could very well be right. I won't dismiss anything at this point.
The number on unit is
Denso 070000-2341

PS The fire never touched it or the wiring around it. Mostly burnt main wiring harness from bottom of engine to the oil tank.
Everything works as its supposed to electrically.
None of the ignition wiring was burnt.
I find it interesting how you are so certain it's the ignition when it appears to be working fine, and totally disregard missing gaskets.
Who knows, you could very well be right. I won't dismiss anything at this point.
The number on unit is
Denso 070000-2341

PS The fire never touched it or the wiring around it. Mostly burnt main wiring harness from bottom of engine to the oil tank.
Everything works as its supposed to electrically.
None of the ignition wiring was burnt.
I’m saying it’s something in the ignition system because, I’ve worked on a sleds before that have done exactly what you are describing. One ended up being a bad CDI and the other was a timing issue. Both sleds drove me crazy for days, checking and rechecking. Going over the same stuff 4,5,6 times hoping I missed something. Just going threw carbs, fuel pumps, reeds, gas filters, gas lines, ignition coils, wires, plug caps, plugs, chock cables, chock plungers, fresh gas, checking carb boots, checking air silencers, pipes, mufflers for blockages. Checking compression, running it with belt on or off. Somehow some way screwed up way brake system. Checked for shorting wires, checked stator output, And both times when I finally gave in to my stubbornness and said ok maybe it’s a timing issue or cdi issue. I ended up finding the problem. The one sled the damn nut fell off the flywheel and the timing was off, the other sled was the CDI.
Could it be crank seals or missing gaskets on the intake boots, absolutely, now in my experience is that what’s going on here no I don’t think so. Here is what I’d check now.
1) pipes and muffler for blockage. (long shot but you never know)
2) timing….pick up coil should have a .020 air gap and pick a cylinder doesn’t matter which, set it to TDC and see where the nipple/button/protrusion on the flywheel lines up with the center of the pickup coil. Both should be centered with each other. If it’s off by .015 or so it will cause power loss but not running issues anything more will definitely cause running problems.
3) stator low power output on ignition coil side. A doo dealer should have a way to test it.
4) Bad CDI and sadly there’s no way to test it.
If the first 3 check out then it has to be a bad CDI. And I say this because of all the things you’ve already checked/changed and verified to be good. It can only leave a bad CDI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
I just spoke to a buddy of mine who told me those crank seals can cause runability issues like you are having. It does not change the fact that I have never seen it, but apparently it is a thing. I did bring up my experience with getting all two or three cylinders to idle despite any kind of leak, and he confirmed that that running the engine from carbs versus manual injections were two separate things. I did not want to suggest performing a leak test due to the time and effort needed for the setup, but he is adamant that it needs to be done.

I have spent literally hours over multiple phone calls just to help put one of these kits together, not to mention any of the others. The experience has taught me to not even bother suggesting it because it is either too scary for most owners to even attempt, or the amount the help needed to get a kit together requires an abnormally amount of hands-on input. Picture me on the phone with someone at the auto parts stored asking me if this or that part will work to build the kit. It was a pleasure that one time, but the thought of this repeating was overwhelming.

In this particular case, I have given the effort to show that I was in it for the long haul, but know that the amount of detail needed to build these kits is largely overwhelming. As I wrote in an earlier reply, I don't promote the test because it is considered by most owners to being too involved. And why would I even suggest something that I know from experience won't happen? And even if it did happen, I have no way to answer the hard questions that follow. In other words I have multiple reasons to avoid even suggesting it.

I am only mentioning this test because I asked a buddy of mine about your challenge and was told this was the way to go. I have my own experiences and methods, but since he gave two similar experiences for a Ski-Doo triple-triple and Yamaha twin, I figured that it was worth sharing.
I was actually very surprised that I wasn't getting anyone on board with my seal theory. I figured it was a more common problem. Over the years I've seen it a few times but it's usually caused by a disintegrated belt wrapped around the crank.
I can certainly see the benefits of the leak test and it may come down to it but I hope not.
I can well imagine the thrill of dealing with a parts store as most are,,,, less than qualified.
As I already have it sitting on the bench it's getting the seals whether it needs them or not and whatever else I may come across.
Hopefully nothing. Ordered a used exhaust valve assembly off ebay and waiting on the clutch tool before resuming the battle.

Never owned or rode a triple but I always wanted a 650 . Most are blown up unfortunately.
I have a buddy with a 700 and it does sound pretty good. Mine only has a collector instead of the muffler so it's going to be pretty damn loud.
I certainly hope to get my triple experience this winter.

The Indys know better and always behave themselves. Just need to feed them gas and oil to make them happy. Lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 · (Edited)
I’m saying it’s something in the ignition system because, I’ve worked on a sleds before that have done exactly what you are describing. One ended up being a bad CDI and the other was a timing issue. Both sleds drove me crazy for days, checking and rechecking. Going over the same stuff 4,5,6 times hoping I missed something. Just going threw carbs, fuel pumps, reeds, gas filters, gas lines, ignition coils, wires, plug caps, plugs, chock cables, chock plungers, fresh gas, checking carb boots, checking air silencers, pipes, mufflers for blockages. Checking compression, running it with belt on or off. Somehow some way screwed up way brake system. Checked for shorting wires, checked stator output, And both times when I finally gave in to my stubbornness and said ok maybe it’s a timing issue or cdi issue. I ended up finding the problem. The one sled the damn nut fell off the flywheel and the timing was off, the other sled was the CDI.
Could it be crank seals or missing gaskets on the intake boots, absolutely, now in my experience is that what’s going on here no I don’t think so. Here is what I’d check now.
1) pipes and muffler for blockage. (long shot but you never know)
2) timing….pick up coil should have a .020 air gap and pick a cylinder doesn’t matter which, set it to TDC and see where the nipple/button/protrusion on the flywheel lines up with the center of the pickup coil. Both should be centered with each other. If it’s off by .015 or so it will cause power loss but not running issues anything more will definitely cause running problems.
3) stator low power output on ignition coil side. A doo dealer should have a way to test it.
4) Bad CDI and sadly there’s no way to test it.
If the first 3 check out then it has to be a bad CDI. And I say this because of all the things you’ve already checked/changed and verified to be good. It can only leave a bad CDI.
I'm not dismissing the the ignition completely yet and hopefully the stator is good. That could kill the whole project. Even a cdi could put it on hold. The costs are already starting to snowball.
I'll definitely check the timing but I've never lost spark . Already replaced wires, caps and plugs for the hell of it.
The exhaust pipes and the collector (no muffler) are definitely clear. I'm going to be picking up a better set of pipes to replace the rusted out ones it came with. Had to do a major patch job on one of them.
The engine is on the bench now and getting the seals either way. Everything that can be checked, will be, before going back in.
Going to be a couple weeks before I continue the battle.
 

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I was actually very surprised that I wasn't getting anyone on board with my seal theory. I figured it was a more common problem. Over the years I've seen it a few times but it's usually caused by a disintegrated belt wrapped around the crank.
I can certainly see the benefits of the leak test and it may come down to it but I hope not.

I can well imagine the thrill of dealing with a parts store as most are,,,, less than qualified.

As I already have it sitting on the bench it's getting the seals whether it needs them or not and whatever else I may come across. Hopefully nothing. Ordered a used exhaust valve assembly off ebay and waiting on the clutch tool before resuming the battle.

Never owned or rode a triple but I always wanted a 650 . Most are blown up unfortunately.

I have a buddy with a 700 and it does sound pretty good. Mine only has a collector instead of the muffler so it's going to be pretty damn loud. I certainly hope to get my triple experience this winter.

The Indys know better and always behave themselves. Just need to feed them gas and oil to make them happy. Lol
I am sure there are others. Perhaps not the right time of the season, or someone is waiting to see how this thread unravels, who knows.

So you have never ridden a triple, but you have a friend who has a 700. That is good enough for me. He must be anxious for this triple to run.

What's this about most 650s being blown-up? Never heard of this. The only 650 that I am aware of is from Polaris and it is relatively new without failures that I know of. Are you thinking of the older 600s?

What is this about the collector? The three tuned pipes either merge into the muffler, or they are routed individually to their own mufflers. I don't know why they are often called stingers when they are loud cans. I have done the cans and the stock tuned pipes and muffler all the way for me. I do not need 100 decibels to enjoy the rocket sound of a triple triple lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 · (Edited)
I am sure there are others. Perhaps not the right time of the season, or someone is waiting to see how this thread unravels, who knows.

So you have never ridden a triple, but you have a friend who has a 700. That is good enough for me. He must be anxious for this triple to run.

What's this about most 650s being blown-up? Never heard of this. The only 650 that I am aware of is from Polaris and it is relatively new without failures that I know of. Are you thinking of the older 600s?

What is this about the collector? The three tuned pipes either merge into the muffler, or they are routed individually to their own mufflers. I don't know why they are often called stingers when they are loud cans. I have done the cans and the stock tuned pipes and muffler all the way for me. I do not need 100 decibels to enjoy the rocket sound of a triple triple lol
The old Indy 650s from early 90s were the rockets of the times.
Unfortunately guys would blow them up quite often. Basically the same sled as the 500s but nowhere near as reliable.
They had issues with the centre cylinder going down when running wide open for extended periods.
The owner of the shop I worked at back then would blow his up at least once a month.
Racing across lake Simcoe all the time will do that I suppose. Probably wasn't stock either..

My buddy with the 700 found a good set of pipes but no muffler for mine. Still have to pick them up. Got a good deal, I think, ($100) but another added cost.

The stinger wasn't my doing, came that way Unfortunately.
Maybe if I win this battle I'll try finding a muffler for it some day. Maybe. Lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
I’m saying it’s something in the ignition system because, I’ve worked on a sleds before that have done exactly what you are describing. One ended up being a bad CDI and the other was a timing issue. Both sleds drove me crazy for days, checking and rechecking. Going over the same stuff 4,5,6 times hoping I missed something. Just going threw carbs, fuel pumps, reeds, gas filters, gas lines, ignition coils, wires, plug caps, plugs, chock cables, chock plungers, fresh gas, checking carb boots, checking air silencers, pipes, mufflers for blockages. Checking compression, running it with belt on or off. Somehow some way screwed up way brake system. Checked for shorting wires, checked stator output, And both times when I finally gave in to my stubbornness and said ok maybe it’s a timing issue or cdi issue. I ended up finding the problem. The one sled the damn nut fell off the flywheel and the timing was off, the other sled was the CDI.
Could it be crank seals or missing gaskets on the intake boots, absolutely, now in my experience is that what’s going on here no I don’t think so. Here is what I’d check now.
1) pipes and muffler for blockage. (long shot but you never know)
2) timing….pick up coil should have a .020 air gap and pick a cylinder doesn’t matter which, set it to TDC and see where the nipple/button/protrusion on the flywheel lines up with the center of the pickup coil. Both should be centered with each other. If it’s off by .015 or so it will cause power loss but not running issues anything more will definitely cause running problems.
3) stator low power output on ignition coil side. A doo dealer should have a way to test it.
4) Bad CDI and sadly there’s no way to test it.
If the first 3 check out then it has to be a bad CDI. And I say this because of all the things you’ve already checked/changed and verified to be good. It can only leave a bad CDI.
Quick question.
I assumed the stator was the complete assembly that cost around $300 BUT then I seen a listing for a " stator pick up pulsar coil" for $40 .
Is that the actual part needed ?
If so , I would likely change it just to cross another "maybe" off the list.
 

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I'm late for the party as I have been helping a farmer friend who also rents my land to grow crops on. Putting in long hours from early AM to well into the evening chopping hay and corn and driving trucks. So much for being retired.
You say you are going to change seals on the crankshaft. I doubt you are going to do that. Changing seals requires the crankshaft be totally disassembled to access and replace the inner seals. To disassemble the crank you would need all the necessary plates etc. to press the crankshaft apart and back together again along with dial indicators and blocks to phase the crank pins at exactly 120 deg. apart. This is a job which must be done by someone who not only has the tools to do this but the knowledge and experience to do it right the first time. If you don't have access to any of this you would be better off replacing the crankshaft with a 'new' rebuilt crankshaft which will put some strain on your grocery budget. If the crankshaft has the original bearings on it with the plastic bearing cages you need to take a close look at the cages and inspect them for tiny hairline cracks. If these cages start to break up the balls in the bearings will stack up and you'll end up with not only a ruined crankshaft but a damaged beyond repair crankcase and a good possibility of other parts damage. If the bearings have metal cages the bearings have been replaced at some point in time. I'm sure the seals would have been replaced at that time also.
Anytime I do anything to a triple engine the first thing I do is to remove the crankshaft and send it out for all new bearings and seals. Anything less and I know I'm assembling a time bomb.
You are asking about the pulse coil. These are a low failure item on a triple although I have run across one bad one. In that case the engine would not fire at all.. It would not be the cause of your problem though IMO as the coil isn't cylinder selective. I'm referring back to where you stated one cylinder seems to be firing correctly but the other two are not. The stator on the other hand is a known weak link in the system. They can do all sorts of strange things with no rhyme or reason. I try to work around the idea of a bad stator when working on triples but have replaced a couple as a last resort and solved a runability issue. The tests you will find in a manual are flawed in my opinion. I have tested stators which worked fine and tested bad and have tested brand new stators out of the box which have tested bad but worked as they should after they were installed. And yes, I have used several different ohm meters to test these with.
At this point in time, now that you have the crank out, you should check the inner seals carefully. These seals should have some drag on them when you try to spin them on the shaft. The rubber should feel soft and a close inspection should show no evidence of cracks no matter how small. If in doubt, throw it out. The seals between your two suspect cylinders need a second or third look before reinstalling the crankshaft if that's your plan.
 

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I concur with much of the advice on here. LETMGROW has very sage advice about these sleds as well as Daag44, David H, and most of the long-timers in this forum.
I did a full rebuild of an F-III and posted the tread in this forum. just Search for "Jason's 97 FIII build" - that may help you out a bit for the general items.

On Youtube, I started to re-chronicle the process of planning and rebuilding an F/CK3 Series triple. I only got 4 episodes in and then I sold the sled and bought something a bit more versatile. Here is a link to the playlist, hopefully you will find some useful info in there. I think the #2 vid will be a waste of time for you but there should be some relevant info in the others:


I still miss that sled at times - definitely miss that sweet exhaust note...

-Jason
 

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Quick question.
I assumed the stator was the complete assembly that cost around $300 BUT then I seen a listing for a " stator pick up pulsar coil" for $40 .
Is that the actual part needed ?
If so , I would likely change it just to cross another "maybe" off the list.
The stator is the one piece that is known to fail across all sleds. The pick-up coil (aka CPS - Crank Position Sensor), is one that I expect can also fail on old high mileage cars, but not on sleds that are low mileage compared to any car. I have seen one fail, but it was smashed from earth magnets coming loosing. Even the one from a crankshaft that had such an excessive runout that it was rubbing against the CPS, it was fine once the crankshaft was replaced. The timing light is my go to tool to diagnose most ignition related issues. I find it easier and less expensive than part swapping. The spark tester hasn't worked for me, but you did say it worked for you, so if it did then there is no good reason to go further on the ignition side unless you are left unsure, and if so migrate to a better took like I have. It is worth to borrow this tool from a neighbour. If it shows as promising tool, then buy one at a later time. Some timing lights don't work well with two strokes, so borrowing one is a safer bet.
 

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LETMGROW, it is interesting to see that you have found stators out of spec that worked well. I believe that testing can only be done accurately by measuring the AC output voltage from the stator. I imagine that measuring the current output with a clamp meter would also work, but I have never tried.... yet.

The only difficult part is finding a place between plugs to get the readings from. I like what you said about the CPS. Since it is a wasted ignition, if it affects one cylinder then it should affect all of them. However I don't know if this is the case in practice. I don't see spark strength with a timing light, but I do see obvious problems in the ignition.
 

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Discussion Starter · #71 · (Edited)
I'm late for the party as I have been helping a farmer friend who also rents my land to grow crops on. Putting in long hours from early AM to well into the evening chopping hay and corn and driving trucks. So much for being retired.
You say you are going to change seals on the crankshaft. I doubt you are going to do that. Changing seals requires the crankshaft be totally disassembled to access and replace the inner seals. To disassemble the crank you would need all the necessary plates etc. to press the crankshaft apart and back together again along with dial indicators and blocks to phase the crank pins at exactly 120 deg. apart. This is a job which must be done by someone who not only has the tools to do this but the knowledge and experience to do it right the first time. If you don't have access to any of this you would be better off replacing the crankshaft with a 'new' rebuilt crankshaft which will put some strain on your grocery budget. If the crankshaft has the original bearings on it with the plastic bearing cages you need to take a close look at the cages and inspect them for tiny hairline cracks. If these cages start to break up the balls in the bearings will stack up and you'll end up with not only a ruined crankshaft but a damaged beyond repair crankcase and a good possibility of other parts damage. If the bearings have metal cages the bearings have been replaced at some point in time. I'm sure the seals would have been replaced at that time also.
Anytime I do anything to a triple engine the first thing I do is to remove the crankshaft and send it out for all new bearings and seals. Anything less and I know I'm assembling a time bomb.
You are asking about the pulse coil. These are a low failure item on a triple although I have run across one bad one. In that case the engine would not fire at all.. It would not be the cause of your problem though IMO as the coil isn't cylinder selective. I'm referring back to where you stated one cylinder seems to be firing correctly but the other two are not. The stator on the other hand is a known weak link in the system. They can do all sorts of strange things with no rhyme or reason. I try to work around the idea of a bad stator when working on triples but have replaced a couple as a last resort and solved a runability issue. The tests you will find in a manual are flawed in my opinion. I have tested stators which worked fine and tested bad and have tested brand new stators out of the box which have tested bad but worked as they should after they were installed. And yes, I have used several different ohm meters to test these with.
At this point in time, now that you have the crank out, you should check the inner seals carefully. These seals should have some drag on them when you try to spin them on the shaft. The rubber should feel soft and a close inspection should show no evidence of cracks no matter how small. If in doubt, throw it out. The seals between your two suspect cylinders need a second or third look before reinstalling the crankshaft if that's your plan.
I guess I should have stated that the outer seals are the only ones I'm doing. As you said ,it's a very in depth job to do them all and no l wouldn't have the special tools or the experience required to get that indepth with it.
That would also put this project out the shop door expense wise.

I tore it semi apart today and checked the CPS gap , mag side seal ,water pump and the crank phase.

CPS gap is fine, although flywheel trigger points are pretty rusty.
The seal does appear to be seaping, although doubtful it's the cause of my problem.
Water pump is smooth as butter, quiet and no leaks, so not touching it.
Crank is in phase.
Coils all have same resistance.
Otherwise,,,,I see nothing !!

My plan ,,,, replace seal and gasket, replace CPS and clean flywheel ,install intake gaskets.

Probably take a week or two for the parts to arrive and put it all back together.
Then pray to the snowmobile gods to make this F. 3 finally run.
If they do answer, you'll most likely hear me celebrating !!
Then it will be a toss up as to whether it was the CPS, crusty flywheel or missing intake gaskets that fixed it.
If not,,,,,well,, you still might hear me, but it won't be a pleasant sound.
Maybe I should start chanting to them now just incase their busy.

Wish me luck and thanks for all the responses from everyone.
Unfortunately,, I'm not overly optimistic at this point but we shall see.
 

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I guess I should have stated that the outer seals are the only ones I'm doing. As you said ,it's a very in depth job to do them all and no l wouldn't have the special tools or the experience required to get that indepth with it.
That would also put this project out the shop door expense wise.

I tore it semi apart today and checked the CPS gap , mag side seal ,water pump and the crank phase.

CPS gap is fine, although flywheel trigger points are pretty rusty.
The seal does appear to be seaping, although doubtful it's the cause of my problem.
Water pump is smooth as butter, quiet and no leaks, so not touching it.
Crank is in phase.
Coils all have same resistance.
Otherwise,,,,I see nothing !!

My plan ,,,, replace seal and gasket, replace CPS and clean flywheel ,install intake gaskets.

Probably take a week or two for the parts to arrive and put it all back together.
Then pray to the snowmobile gods to make this F. 3 finally run.
If they do answer, you'll most likely hear me celebrating !!
Then it will be a toss up as to whether it was the CPS, crusty flywheel or missing intake gaskets that fixed it.
If not,,,,,well,, you still might hear me, but it won't be a pleasant sound.
Maybe I should start chanting to them now just incase their busy.

Wish me luck and thanks for all the responses from everyone.
Unfortunately,, I'm not overly optimistic at this point but we shall see.
I am glad that you have worked out of plan. I have my own troubles with my latest project that I have been working on. I nearly posted my latest trials and figured who really cares.

The only things that I have left to question for the 3 months that you spent to get it working on a 3 cylinders are what I listed below. For all those 4 things I use different tools that I added for each with #4 that does cover the CPS. I may be way out in the left field, so take it for what it is worth.

1. Gas input - Squirt bottle;
2. Plug fouling - Wire wheel;
3. Ignition strength - Magnifying glass;
4. Ignition timing - Timing light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
I am glad that you have worked out of plan. I have my own troubles with my latest project that I have been working on. I nearly posted my latest trials and figured who really cares.

The only things that I have left to question for the 3 months that you spent to get it working on a 3 cylinders are what I listed below. For all those 4 things I use different tools that I added for each with #4 that does cover the CPS. I may be way out in the left field, so take it for what it is worth.

1. Gas input - Squirt bottle;
2. Plug fouling - Wire wheel;
3. Ignition strength - Magnifying glass;
4. Ignition timing - Timing light.
You'll never know "who really cares" till you ask. I've been getting good advice and information here.
No need to be shy and bashful Lol
Nobody "Knows it all" , so there is no shame in asking.

Left field, right field or outer space, I'm open to any and all ideas at this point.
Hell, I'm debating on just cleaning everything up and putting it back together !
. Need to replace housing gasket and seal to avoid any chance of engine removal AGAIN !
I am approaching the breaking point on expenses.

One last thing I forgot to mention, not sure if it's relevant but there is a ridiculous amount of dirt, no metal, in the stator and flywheel. Why and how is a mystery.

I'm really wondering if those rusty trigger points on the flywheel could be causing a weak and/or intermittent spark.??
A spark tester wouldn't pick that up but a timing light might.

1.Squirt bottle... check
2.Wire wheel... check
3.Mag glass... will get if need be.
4.Snap-on timing light... check

You forgot one more !.

5. Gas and match.... check, check.
Hate to waste the gas, and parts but it would be therapeutic ! Lol
 

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# 6. Move sled far from buildings before striking match. Call insurance company tomorrow morning.
Seriously, going back where I said the stator tests are not accurate. I have been using a high end impedience ohm meter and testing the stator per the procedure in the Ski Doo shop manual. I need to go over to my friend's house and grab my manuals and notebook then I can tell you where I found the procedure in the manual.
I tested two brand new OEM stators I have and they both tested bad right out of the box while a third one my friend had tested good. I put one of my stators in my son in law's '97 Mach Z 809 and it runs perfectly. Makes no sense at all. He replaced the stator I used and it tested good. My other new stator still tests bad.
 

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No doubt on what Lynn is saying, I’ve seen the exact samething stators test good and no worky. Then test bad and then work great.
the rust on the trigger point won’t really affect anything but doesn’t hurt to clean everything up.
maybe I missed it in all the reading but did you do a static check on the timing? If that’s good then I’m still saying it’s a CDI issue. I will say that Lynn has a good point about weak stator output. Which isn’t hard to check if you have a meter that will record peak voltage output while you pulling it over. But you are saying that you have good strong spark, so idk if it’s a weak spark issue.
 

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#7 Invite friends and get them to bring grillades lol

Letmgrow, is high impedance to measure AC voltage?


 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
# 6. Move sled far from buildings before striking match. Call insurance company tomorrow morning.
Seriously, going back where I said the stator tests are not accurate. I have been using a high end impedience ohm meter and testing the stator per the procedure in the Ski Doo shop manual. I need to go over to my friend's house and grab my manuals and notebook then I can tell you where I found the procedure in the manual.
I tested two brand new OEM stators I have and they both tested bad right out of the box while a third one my friend had tested good. I put one of my stators in my son in law's '97 Mach Z 809 and it runs perfectly. Makes no sense at all. He replaced the stator I used and it tested good. My other new stator still tests bad.
So basically, it's pointless to even bother testing the stator ?
I certainly can't afford to blindly throw parts at it, especially the expensive ones at that.
Only plan now is to clean it all up, replace seal and gasket, reinstall ,assemble and see what happens.
If still not cooperating, park it in the back 40 and get the old dependable Indys out and forget about the Doont.
Sad that it's heading that way, I had hopes for it. Hard lesson learned I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
No doubt on what Lynn is saying, I’ve seen the exact samething stators test good and no worky. Then test bad and then work great.
the rust on the trigger point won’t really affect anything but doesn’t hurt to clean everything up.
maybe I missed it in all the reading but did you do a static check on the timing? If that’s good then I’m still saying it’s a CDI issue. I will say that Lynn has a good point about weak stator output. Which isn’t hard to check if you have a meter that will record peak voltage output while you pulling it over. But you are saying that you have good strong spark, so idk if it’s a weak spark issue.
Nope you didn't miss anything, I didn't do or check anything on the timing. Just checked for spark and all seemed to be working fine.
When it first came to life I could keep it going, even on one cylinder and it progressively got worse
ever since.
With the great news about not being able to believe test results on the stator and the only other option is the cdi box , the two most expensive parts , I think the white flag will be raised shortly.
I can't afford to keep , blindly , throwing parts at it.
Certainly wasn't fun while it lasted.
Maybe next year. Damn Ski Don't.!
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 · (Edited)
No doubt on what Lynn is saying, I’ve seen the exact samething stators test good and no worky. Then test bad and then work great.
the rust on the trigger point won’t really affect anything but doesn’t hurt to clean everything up.
maybe I missed it in all the reading but did you do a static check on the timing? If that’s good then I’m still saying it’s a CDI issue. I will say that Lynn has a good point about weak stator output. Which isn’t hard to check if you have a meter that will record peak voltage output while you pulling it over. But you are saying that you have good strong spark, so idk if it’s a weak spark issue.
I was reviewing all the replies and one thing kind of peeked my interest.
You said that the button on flywheel should line up with crs when at TDC .
What if it doesn't ?
How could it possibly be out?
I can't remember how they lined up and won't be able to check it out till I get it back together but I'm thinking it is off.
I finally found the procedure in the manual. Will definitely check it out when I get parts to put it back together.
 

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I was reviewing all the replies and one thing kind of peeked my interest.
You said that the button on flywheel should line up with crs when at TDC .
What if it doesn't ?
How could it possibly be out?
I can't remember how they lined up and won't be able to check it out till I get it back together but I'm thinking it is off.
I finally found the procedure in the manual. Will definitely check it out when I get parts to put it back together.
Perhaps a missing or sheered keyway? Or maybe a replacement magneto with the keyway in the wrong location?

Most things that have been mentioned so far is relatively easy to check. I am not all that familiar with any difficulties in measuring the stator ignition coil as Letmgrow mentioned, but I think he was only cautioning that a failed test could be a false negative and don't let it lead you to replacing the stator just because that one test may fail.

From what I can see, so far the biggest obstacle has been worrying about what if and will it break the budget. Those thoughts will lead to an aneurysm. At this point I don't think that you need to worry about investing any more money, but rather on diagnosing the problem. Now that it is on a bench there are things worth doing. Just take one step and see where it leads. You are no longer fighting this battle on your own.
 
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