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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an existing 2006 MXZ Adrenaline 500 SS with 6500 miles (WI/MI riding). Im 59 and I just cant take the original REV GEN-1 sit position where your knees are bent like pretzels. I had a chance to ride a 2016 Renegade Adrenaline ACE 900 (RAS/rMotion) and a 2019 Renegade Adrenaline ACE 900 (RAS3/rMotion). The 2019 (RAS3) was much noticeably smoother on the front end in the fast bumps. These sleds were lightyears better than my old one. I am looking for a sled that will last another 15 years. I am thinking of an Renegade Enduro with the ACS (rear Air suspension) - a 2022 or 2023 with RASX and rMotion X. Does anyone have any good experience on the ASC rear suspension in regards to trail comfort compared to a normal HPG rear shock Renegade in the bumps? Some reviews say its a high mileage all-day sled in regards to comfort. Is the Enduro worth the extra $2500?
 

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The 22/23 Adrenaline and Enduro both have cheap non-rebuildable shocks. If you want the best ride buy a base model sled and put some nice aftermarket shocks on it, valved for you weight and riding style. $2,500 can easily buy a set of Elka shocks for example. Or buy a higher end X or XRS model and have the shocks revalved.
 

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The Enduro is pretty focused on comfortable trail riding. At least from a stock out of the box answer, it seems to me the Enduro is going to be a lot more comfy (if that is the focus) than the Adrenalines. My wife and I have bad backs from a car accident a few decades ago…well that and slowly getting older…ha. The Enduro lineup is one we really like for that reason - a more comfortable ride. We have the last year GSX SE, which changed into the Enduro in regards to BRP branding, in 2016. It’s a VERY comfortable ride, and I‘d expect the new Enduro’s to be better yet. We’ve eyed an Enduro as our most likley next sled purchase for those reasons. Worth the extra money? To us for the comfort, yes.

Now if you want to do all sorts of modifications, maybe do what some others are recommending above. However, I have always been a fan of the air ride suspension myself, so having that on the Enduro‘s is really nice IMHO. Seems to me that simply switching front shocks is an easier solution IF that is even an issue for someone.

I suspect that once you rode an Enduro, you’d really notice the improved ride comfort, and those front shocks wouldn‘t be a concern for you. Any way for you to test ride an Enduro as well since you’ve already tested out some Adrenalines? That way you’ll have some limited first hand experience?

Good luck with your decision. As expensive as all sleds are these days, it makes it that much harder to decide. I guess on the positive end, resale values are strong. If not happy after purchase, you could probably just sell it for what you paid and do another spring order the following year for the other sled…
 

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The adrenaline is a great ride out of the box. There have been many posts on here where folks have changed out the air shock for traditional shocks. If the air shocks gave a better ride, they would put them on all sleds. The plus to the air shock is the on the fly adjustability.

For most people, the adrenaline shocks are just fine. Rears are rebuildable and fronts are inexpensive enough to replace, if needed.
 

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I'd avoid that air suspension if it was me. It WILL fail eventually. And it's my understanding that if that rear shock fails, you're not riding anywhere.
The Rmotion rides so good, that I don't find much adjustment necessary once you get it dialed in.
Do they still have the running board quick adjust as an option?
My sister in law has it on her 2013 renegade x and that's pretty slick. Reach back and twist a knob, boom, done.



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My experience with the Air Ride:

10,170+ miles on an 2016 Enduro 600 with no shock failure. Had to replace the air line between the frame and shock and check valve last year around 8000 miles.
7,000+ miles on an 2019 Enduro 850 with no shock failure.

We ride a lot, we ride fairly quickly, and we don't worry about moguls we just adjust the shock and keep going. If you adjust the sled to your weight and then adjust the air shock as conditions change it is damn comfortable. I have not found a riding condition where the air ride has not been useful in some way.
I just added Bite Harder suspensions rings to the front shocks of our sleds. (2) Enduro's (1) TNT and that made the front ride even better.

We don't ditch bang, we don't jump every snow pile, we don't spin out our tracks...we just ride and the Air shock has been good to us.
 

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I have a 2022 Enduro 600R that just finished up breakin this weekend. I'm still getting use to adjusting the carbides and the ACS, but the extra money gets you more than just the ACS and includes the heated comfort seat, a medium windshield with deflectors, wide body G4 with the storage area in the seat, heated shield plug, heavy duty front bumper, Ice Ripper track (when they don't run out of them that is), the 7.8 gauge, which might even offer GPS maps in your area, and the TX adjustable carbide skis. My riding buddy has a 2016 MXZ sport with an upgraded rear (but not front) suspension. We swapped sleds for a few miles. He left the ACS on 3, which is a sweet spot for comfort on mild bumps. We are both getting on, and he has been complaining about his back. We ran across some washboards and I felt like my lower back was getting jiggled in 5 different directions at once. My intercom crackled as he turned past the stutter bump corner and zipped up a straight section at 70+. "I hope you're not too fond of this sled cause your not getting it back" he said and cackled. He couldn't believe how smooth it was over the bumps and how comfortable in general. He said the word that best fits the Enduro is "refined".
 

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RPT,

This has been my exact experience with the Enduro as well. I have run 60+ mph thru 10-15 miles of 8" to 10" moguls, late in the day, both standing and sitting and it smooths them all out. I felt like the sled could handle more but I did not want to push it. Clarification: The trails where wide and sweeping in this location and it there was good site distance. If the trails are tight and twisty then you have to slow it down to 30 mph and stand for those portions.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a 2022 Enduro 600R that just finished up breakin this weekend. I'm still getting use to adjusting the carbides and the ACS, but the extra money gets you more than just the ACS and includes the heated comfort seat, a medium windshield with deflectors, wide body G4 with the storage area in the seat, heated shield plug, heavy duty front bumper, Ice Ripper track (when they don't run out of them that is), the 7.8 gauge, which might even offer GPS maps in your area, and the TX adjustable carbide skis. My riding buddy has a 2016 MXZ sport with an upgraded rear (but not front) suspension. We swapped sleds for a few miles. He left the ACS on 3, which is a sweet spot for comfort on mild bumps. We are both getting on, and he has been complaining about his back. We ran across some washboards and I felt like my lower back was getting jiggled in 5 different directions at once. My intercom crackled as he turned past the stutter bump corner and zipped up a straight section at 70+. "I hope you're not too fond of this sled cause your not getting it back" he said and cackled. He couldn't believe how smooth it was over the bumps and how comfortable in general. He said the word that best fits the Enduro is "refined".
Im thinking Enduro as it also has a 7.8" LCD color display which can display trail maps from BRP GO/Connect apps. Id hate to get stuck with small black/white no bluetooth/no maps minimalist LCD display for next 15 years.
 

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Does anyone have more of an apples to apples comparison on a G4 Renegade Adrenaline or Renegade X model vs G4 Enduro ride on trail? You really can't accurately compare the ride on a 6-10 year old XS chassis to a Gen4 2022 Enduro.
 

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Its not an Adrenaline but I think it would be close My son has a 2019 MXZ TNT 850 129 track w/ 96 studs, 1700 miles. I put 100 miles on it March 5th.

I rode it on flat trail early in the morning north of Paradise. It felt really fast and easily felt lighter than my Enduro. The limiter strap was tightened up one hole and it was still easy to lift the skis. The front end felt light when you gave it a good pull on the throttle. Rode really nice even thru the moguls. We hit a 20 mile stretch of 14"-16" moguls between Paradise and Pine stump junction in the U.P.
It did just fine. 30 mph thru them with out a hitch just needed to stand up while doing that.

I am undecided about the stock ski's, they seam to unexpectedly twist to the right once in a while just after the top of a mogul and I am not sure why. Maybe the shape of the ski causes this My son noticed that as well. That has not happened on the TS skis on both my other Enduro's. The ski's push in the corners more than the TS ski so we added the additional 4" runner on the outside of each ski and it seamed to help. So we have 8" carbide in the center with 4" on the side. I also noticed the skis would really grab the high edge of the trail end ride right up the wall of snow. It happened twice to me and it almost dumped me off the first time because the snow edge was hard and about 36" high. scared the crap out of me so I stayed away from that. Never had that happen to me in all the miles on my TS ski.

Its a good sled, lighter than the Enduro less expensive than the Enduro. More playful you could say but I still choose my Enduro for those 150 to 200 mile days.

If it was my sled I would consider a different set of ski's on his sled and call it good.
 

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Im thinking Enduro as it also has a 7.8" LCD color display which can display trail maps from BRP GO/Connect apps. Id hate to get stuck with small black/white no bluetooth/no maps minimalist LCD display for next 15 years.
I have so far found the 7.8 gauge diappointing. As far as the GPS is concerned there are not trail maps for every area, For example, NH does have maps, but Maine, where I ride, does not. Also, it depends on you getting a phone signal, which may not be possible in some remote areas. Some of the display, like stats related to trip meters, are quite small, and hard to decipher while you are moving. The gauge controls favor the music and phone functions, which many people do not care about, to the detriment of previously one button controls. For example, in prior years the ACS level was changed by pressing a rocker style button atop the left handlebar controls. Press one side to go up, one to go down. Easy to do on the fly. Now that has been dedicated to answering a phone call and to change the ACS you press a buttnon at the base of the rotary gauge (joystick), rotate the dial up left or right to change level (the setting is displayed in the digital gauge) and then press down on the joystick to set it. You have to be stopped or going really slow to do it, and it is three different button presses or turns, that take your hand off the bars compared to just one on the bars. I am sure it will be made simpler when migrated to the G5 chassis an the new 10 inch gauge, but that is at least two years away. The 7.8 gauge is attractive, and beyond the GPS pretty functional. But it could have been so much better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have so far found the 7.8 gauge diappointing. As far as the GPS is concerned there are not trail maps for every area, For example, NH does have maps, but Maine, where I ride, does not. Also, it depends on you getting a phone signal, which may not be possible in some remote areas. Some of the display, like stats related to trip meters, are quite small, and hard to decipher while you are moving. The gauge controls favor the music and phone functions, which many people do not care about, to the detriment of previously one button controls. For example, in prior years the ACS level was changed by pressing a rocker style button atop the left handlebar controls. Press one side to go up, one to go down. Easy to do on the fly. Now that has been dedicated to answering a phone call and to change the ACS you press a buttnon at the base of the rotary gauge (joystick), rotate the dial up left or right to change level (the setting is displayed in the digital gauge) and then press down on the joystick to set it. You have to be stopped or going really slow to do it, and it is three different button presses or turns, that take your hand off the bars compared to just one on the bars. I am sure it will be made simpler when migrated to the G5 chassis an the new 10 inch gauge, but that is at least two years away. The 7.8 gauge is attractive, and beyond the GPS pretty functional. But it could have been so much better.
In regards to phone signal available - should it matter if you downloaded the map region you are in for offline use? It should just use the phones GPS signal even with no cellular signal. Same when I go backpacking with no cellular signal like on All Trails app.
 

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In regards to phone signal available - should it matter if you downloaded the map region you are in for offline use? It should just use the phones GPS signal even with no cellular signal. Same when I go backpacking with no cellular signal like on All Trails app.
Reportedly that is so. I had brought up a map of the Jackman, Maine region last weekend but the sled wouldn't allow me to track my progress or even keep the map on the screen due to signal issues. But, I am not the most tech savvy person and perhaps I didn't set things up correctly.
 

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I have an existing 2006 MXZ Adrenaline 500 SS with 6500 miles (WI/MI riding). Im 59 and I just cant take the original REV GEN-1 sit position where your knees are bent like pretzels. I had a chance to ride a 2016 Renegade Adrenaline ACE 900 (RAS/rMotion) and a 2019 Renegade Adrenaline ACE 900 (RAS3/rMotion). The 2019 (RAS3) was much noticeably smoother on the front end in the fast bumps. These sleds were lightyears better than my old one. I am looking for a sled that will last another 15 years. I am thinking of an Renegade Enduro with the ACS (rear Air suspension) - a 2022 or 2023 with RASX and rMotion X. Does anyone have any good experience on the ASC rear suspension in regards to trail comfort compared to a normal HPG rear shock Renegade in the bumps? Some reviews say its a high mileage all-day sled in regards to comfort. Is the Enduro worth the extra $2500?
Reportedly that is so. I had brought up a map of the Jackman, Maine region last weekend but the sled wouldn't allow me to track my progress or even keep the map on the screen due to signal issues. But, I am not the most tech savvy person and perhaps I didn't set things up correctly.
The Adrenaline is a light sled. That is why my friends purchase them. They want to be fast. They are also the least cost. I purchased an Enduro last season and was really impressed with the suspension. You can set the suspension to what you want for each trail type or what your back can take. ;-) If the trails are bad late in the day I set the shocks to 5 and the sled absorbs all the bumps not my back. If I find myself a day or two into our snowmobile trip and my back is feeling great, I can dial the suspension down to 1 and the sled is on rails going through the corners. The Enduro will allow you to select the suspension you want at any time for whatever the trail conditions are or however your body feels it can handle. My back is questionable but after some time it stretches out and I can ride pretty hard. The Enduro allows me change the sled to whatever riding I want. BTW, if you are riding an Enduro and you are coming out of the corners and your inside ski starts coming up as you throttle out of the turns, that is the Enduro telling to turn your suspension down a few numbers. If my buddies and I are getting aggressive on the trails, I dial my suspension to 1. Then when I throttle out of the turns the inside ski will stick down into the turn and the sled is on rails. Once I rode the Enduro, I will never go back. ;-)
 

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I think something to consider also with these 2 models is the weight that the air compressor and shock add to a sled vs just shocks. It’s 25lbs and that may not be a big thing to some, but it can be for others. Bottom line is, the RMotion does a great job in any package. I run a X and I set it and forget it all season basically, the average rider probably does so too. Not saying the Enduro isn’t worth it, just throwing another thing out there that hasn’t been talked about.


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The adrenaline is a great ride out of the box. There have been many posts on here where folks have changed out the air shock for traditional shocks. If the air shocks gave a better ride, they would put them on all sleds. The plus to the air shock is the on the fly adjustability.

For most people, the adrenaline shocks are just fine. Rears are rebuildable and fronts are inexpensive enough to replace, if needed.
Nothing on adrenaline is rebuildable anymore front or rear
 

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One of the best things I like about the Enduro air shock is when unloading set the air shock on 5 and back out of your trailer and the rear flap is high up off the ground even with you setting on the sled. Same with backing in deep snow.
 
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