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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
have a 2010 800r pteck that is new to me this year and so far i have 800 miles on it

in the beginning it pushed in all the turns with the inside ski lifting. so i tightened down the front piston springs all the way and adjust the +/- screw a the bottom of the piston to half.

sled still pushing a little but a lot better.

so thinking of loosening front spring/piston in track but if i do this does the strap have to be loosened a hole or

two?? and what does that strap do ??

thanks
 

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Master Electrician
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Are you talking about the shock's? Depending on your weight and riding style, you should experiment with less spring pressure at the front shocks. The little screw with the h&l settings is for dampening.

Try raising the limiter strap one hole.( the strap that is on the front of the suspension skid) This will give you more ski pressure and usually make it a little harder to steer. If you let it out it will be a wheelie machine. The front shock adjustment is there to make the ride better, more comfortable. You want the shock set as light as possible and still have good bump cushioning.

Snow conditions play a huge role in this too. Experiment with different settings. Read the owners manual, it explains this very well.
 

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thanks i'll give it a try and play around with it

don't have a manual just doo talk and some other friends
I agree with Bransan, springs light and snow or trail conditions make huge difference. In northern WI it has been very cold. The groomers go out at night and by morning the trails are cement. My sled wants to drive straight off the trails and is very darty. After a few sleds dice it up a bit it gets much better. Middle of the afternoon,you can get your sled to do anything you want. I also have my sled set almost as lite as it will go.
 

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thanks i'll give it a try and play around with it
don't have a manual just doo talk and some other friends
Now you do!
http://www.ski-doo.com/ca/owner-center/overview

I would very seriously suggest reading about your suspension and what your adjusters do, as well as what they actually are. You can make it a heck of a lot worse if you are just guessing, and it's actually not that hard to do.
 
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I suggest to change one thing at a time and not 3 or 4 changes at once. Make 1 change ride it see if helps you get what you are wanting the sled to do. Loose snow will make almost any sled push in the corners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
so far i cranked down the front shock so they are at 4 i ques thats spring tension

handled a lot better

next is to loosen front shock under the track and take it for a ride see how it goes

right now we all have hard packed snow and ice in the turns

if it handles well in these conditions i'll have to mark it because i'm sure i'll have to move it

to another sweet spot when we get a descent dump again
 

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Show me the snow!!
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Just curious, but what skis do you have? What carbides? The best I could ever get mine to handle with the pilots I was running the shapers. This season I put on a new pair of single keel pilots and a set of the Doo extreme skags....... WOW what a difference, yea it will get a little darty on cement like trails, especially when braking hard. But everything else that are great, wish I would have changed them out when the sled was new to be honest.

Just something to consider is all. Otherwise everyone else has you going the right direction for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
think i got it last night

loosened that front shock under the track all the way, loosened strap one hole and went for a ride.

first 5 miles was very bumpy and ruff on me so i stopped and turned the piston down to half on the threads

and the nest 5 miles were softer but hard to steer again.

made another adjustment by loosening half of what i tightened and it seemed to handle good with a nice ride for me

in the bumps.

have to move the strap back to original spot, seems to just have a little to much play.

the skis i'm running have a carbide on both inner and outer edges witch might have something to do with steering on ice or not steering i

should say maybe a ski change is in order, they are not original.

any ideas on a ski bites in good without throwing you in the woods on hard packed grooved trails???

thanks again for all the hints very helpfull
 

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Before you spend money on skis try shimming the ones you have. Take a piece of old hyfax and cut it to fit in the ski saddle sideways. Grind it down to an eighth of an inch thick. Screw or glue it in place at the back of the ski rubber that is between your ski spindle and the ski saddle. This is where the bolt goes through to hold the ski on. What this does is causes more ski pressure in the middle and back of the ski.
 

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Some body here makes shims that fit perfect under ski rubber, I got a set for mine and it helps reduce darting..
 

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Amazing how so many "experienced riders" don't understand the basic suspension setting process. It is outlined in every snowmobile manual in the world. Read that first.

Take my advice or not. First...soft is more comfortable. You want to use as much of the suspension as possible. If the springs are not clapped out. On a 2010 they should be in pretty good shape.

You need to understand that a snowmobile is like a see saw. Essentially, It is suspended on three points. The center shock is the fulcrum. The rear torsion springs and front shocks are the kids on each end. As you increase preload in the center the kids lift off the ground. If you preload the front of back you make one kid or the other fatter.

You want the settings soft so you use as much suspension as possible. If you are 150# you are going to be on the softest ranges of the shock settings. If you are 300# you should be on the higher end of the settings. You should never have any setting on the maximum. That suggests you have it screwed up or that spring is wrong or clapped out. It prevents you from trying more preload at that location. The same can be said for the soft end settings .If the front shocks are on their highest preload setting and the others are on the low setting, something is very unbalanced.

Set the sled up on the floor with static droop like a manuals says to. Take the limiter strap out of the equation. Make sure it only keeps the suspension from over extending. It should not be tight when you sit on the sled....never.

If there are 4 or 5 clicks on the center shock, set it at the mid point. Up a little if you are big, down a little if you are light. Set static sag with you on the sled. Have someone lift the front and rear individually. Depending on the sled 3-4 inches rear maybe 2-3 in the front.

Go ride it. If it wont steer come up a click on the front. If it still wont steer come up on the rear preload. if it still wont steer soften preload on the center shock. Now if it steers good but feels squishy or rolls too much in the corner you may have to come up with all 3 settings. If you are not using all the suspension, and it feels stiff try reducing preload on all three and repeat the process to tweak the front end bite..

Remember never go more than one click at a time. If you preload the front to get it to steer, and you need more front bite preload the rear before you get it unbalanced. One click front, try it, one click rear, try it. Remember..... see saw.

You want to get the sled so you can click the front up or down to change the amount of front bite depending on the conditions. You want the front end to be easy to steer but have just enough bite. Remember a snowmobile is not like a train on the tracks. the best setting is a little understeer with moderate acceleration out of a sweeping turn. It should immediately bite when you back down on the power.

There are other settings The coupling blocks and the limiter strap have some purpose. They should be used after you get the basic preloads set.

Damping setting should be one of the last things you do unless someone went crazy with turning screws.
 
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