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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m getting closer to finally scraping up enough cash to give Aaron a call and order a trailer. Every time I am on his website I tend to gravitate towards the hybrid inline IS716. I just like it. My concern is most of my tows will be 10 hours or more. I’m contemplating going for the dual axle IS716-2. Anyone have one ? It gets heavy and pretty close in price to the inline v nose SNO 714. The v nose trailers just seem really big to me and I’m not sure which way to go. My tow vehicle is undefined right now, as I don’t have a pickup yet. I’m driving a 2017 Toyota Highlander which would be marginal with just the single axle 716. A lot of people are telling me to avoid the single axle for towing as far as I will be towing. Safety factor with two axles is obviously there. So I’m wondering what you all would do? I am buying the trailer first as I need it to store the two sleds this year. I can borrow a truck for this year. I’ll decide on tow vehicle for next year.
 

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I have a SNO 714. I wanted/needed a ride-in/ride-out for my snowbike as dragging it off the open trailer I had was hell on earth. Not to mention dealing with the crudded up covers, in single digits and spending upwards of 30 minutes strapping all sorts of stuff to an open trailer for weekends away.

V-nose with the drop down door and riding in and riding out, with both the snowbike and the snowmobiles is such a luxury. Now that we will have 2-Grand Touring Limiteds for this upcoming winter, it is going to get even better and the trailer is going to be perfect for the two machines. The 714 has also been perfect for me, my wife and the two kids and all our dirtbikes and gear even though it is easy rolling bikes into or out of either door.

I will say, if I did not have the snowbike, a dual axle IS, or even a single axle, to save some money, would be nice too.

The single axle would not really concern me as I know that if I were doing 10 hour tows, I know that I'd be sure to keep up with greasing the hubs using the Dexter EZ Lube hubs, makes it easy to keep good grease in the bearings and I'd just carry two spare tires/wheels.

I have been finding that the more new places I trailer to, and all the parking lots, having the option to load or unload through either the front/V-nose door, or the rear, is nice for when things get crowded or the ability to park is limited.

The SNO 714 is such a nice, nice trailer. I'll be going on having mine for 2 years this upcoming February and it has been flawless so far and it really does pull so, so nice.
 

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Just my $.02..I just purchased a 12 foot R&R ARC Hybrid....I wish I would have added a second axle. It currently has E rated tires that are at the maximum capacity when my 2 heavy ATVs are in in it. Next year I plan to drive back and pay to have a second axle installed (with brakes).
 

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Been snowmobiling a long while, started off with a clam shell. Worked our way up to the big V nose, added brakes along the way. Now we're down sizing, own a hybrid (no brakes). Do like the dual axle. Loved all of them.
 

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I vote single axle. Majority of my tows are 10 hours or more each way, 10 times a year. Single axle boat in summer, and for 14 years a single axle clamshell in winter. Sometimes 20 hour tows if going to Rockies or to canada.

Total faith in a single axle trailer properly maintained at all interstate speeds.

Currently have tandem but only because I'm now hauling 3 sleds consistently and sometimes 4. If I ever go back to 2 sleds I'm gonna go back single axle. Easier to maneuver, easier and cheaper to maintain, lighter....
 

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Everyone says a single axle is safer, but why? I've had a flat on a single axle trailer, it's not unmanageable. Then there are people that tell you a dual axle means you don't have to change a flat on the interstate. Seriously? How many of you folks would KEEP DRIVING your trailer with a flat tire? I personally could not do that, I would have to change it right there, even right on the highway. I'm not going to shred my tire by hauling it 15 miles to the next exit. I had a single axle trailer inline and it was great. My mistake was trying to buy a light trailer to match my tow vehicle. bought a 12' inline with a 5' V that was a single axle because I thought my Toyota Tacoma could haul it. Nope, it sucked hauling that trailer in the winter. Ended up trading it off and buying a dual axle and getting a full size pickup truck. So don't make my mistake, a bigger trailer is always useful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think with the tandem axle, people just pull the flat off and drive to the nearest "safer" spot and change it there. With torsions I believe you can leave the axle "hang" with the tire off and drive. Springers would have to chain the axle up then drive. I know I've changed tires on the side of a busy interstate and it has almost blown the car off the jack when those trucks go by 18 inches away. Scary [email protected]$.

Options are what I like learning about on these forums. I've been warned by many to not tow too much with an inferior sized tow vehicle. Tail ends up wagging the dog too often. These darn trailers are awful expensive and I want to get it right the first time I buy. I'll buy the truck next year Budget only stretches so far each year. Once piece at a time. (God bless Johnny Cash BTW)

I appreciate all the input so far
 

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I think with the tandem axle, people just pull the flat off and drive to the nearest "safer" spot and change it there. With torsions I believe you can leave the axle "hang" with the tire off and drive. Springers would have to chain the axle up then drive. I know I've changed tires on the side of a busy interstate and it has almost blown the car off the jack when those trucks go by 18 inches away. Scary [email protected]$.

Options are what I like learning about on these forums. I've been warned by many to not tow too much with an inferior sized tow vehicle. Tail ends up wagging the dog too often. These darn trailers are awful expensive and I want to get it right the first time I buy. I'll buy the truck next year Budget only stretches so far each year. Once piece at a time. (God bless Johnny Cash BTW)

I appreciate all the input so far
But when we pulled the switch all three headlights came on.

Don~
 

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I like the 714+v nose. It's only 14" longer which won't be noticeable when towing. And you can get it with a 6.5' interior height which is really nice (I went 7' tall on my new v-nose and it's sooo nice to walk around in). The 714 might seem large now but after you pull it once it won't seem so big. A Highlander can tow 5,000 pounds, right? A 714 with two sleds can't be more than 3,500 pounds.
 

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I like the 714+v nose. It's only 14" longer which won't be noticeable when towing. And you can get it with a 6.5' interior height which is really nice (I went 7' tall on my new v-nose and it's sooo nice to walk around in). The 714 might seem large now but after you pull it once it won't seem so big. A Highlander can tow 5,000 pounds, right? A 714 with two sleds can't be more than 3,500 pounds.
A Highlander will likely have issues with GVWR even with the trailer at 3500lbs. Especially if you are full of passengers. Max tow ratings are marketing gimmicks used as a sales tool by the manufacturers. No Highlander should tow 5000lbs, and when you do the math on GVWR and GCVWR you will not be able to tow much with a Highlander.

Here is a link to how I explained the math in another thread here on the forum that explains why max tow ratings are basically useless numbers: https://www.dootalk.com/forums/topic/1567383-in-the-market-for-a-new-trucktow-vehicle-tundra-f-150-silverado-which-to-buy/?p=22993029
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah, the Highlander will NOT be my tow vehicle on the new trailer, whatever one I decide on. It pulls my Triton Elite 5 pretty darn well, but that was in summer conditions picking up the sled. Never towed that trailer in winter conditions. Towed a 7x14 open deck trailer with two old Massey Ski Whiz’s on it. Snotty slick roads, Slowing down for an intersection, I could feel the trailer pushing and I almost blasted through the stop sign. Marginal tow vehicles need brakes to help out. Will be upgrading to something bigger next year. Truck probably, Suburban maybe. Need to bag the coil spring rears I’ve been told on the Suburban. I’m leaning towards the 714 but for a little more $$ the 718 would allow an extra rider to tag along on a trip and split costs. Decisions decisions Funny how you can talk yourself into bigger and bigger things.
 

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You will never regret a larger inline trailer. I am single, only have one sled now that I traded in the 1200 and 800 etec for a 900t, and I still wish I had got an 18 instead of my 14 footer. But I do love my inline!

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