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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

So I recently rebuilt my 583 from top to bottom. I replaced the crank seals and bearings. I used new pistons, bearings, clips, and set the ring gap. I used new gaskets throughout. I cleaned the carbs (twice actually). The compression is a touch over 125PSI in both cylinders after break-in. The compression between the two cylinders is dead on.

So here is the problem...

The sled idles at 1700-1800RPM. Sounds great. Plugs look great.

If I hammer on the throttle from idle, it bogs down almost like I choke it and run it rich.

If I run the sled for awhile, shut it off, wait 5 minutes and restart I cant very easily.

Priming it floods it.

So what I have found was to take the kill tether and use two of the loops from it. I open the thumb throttle and put two loops in so the throttle lever is at like 10% above idle. That always starts it up without using the primer or flooding it.

Any thoughts? It would seem to me that the mix is a little rich. The more air I give it, the easier it seems to start (I think) I have looked over the carb boots and all seems fine there.

Let me know if anyone has some insight into this.

Thanks,

Jason
 

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Maybe I mis understood but your sayin your using your teather to hold your throttle open? .... I'd say take advantage of the workout and hold it with one and pull with the other arm... I wouldn't risk having the throttle rigged like that but if it works I guess it's what works... But to the problem, are you letting the sled warm up a lot
Before you hammer the gas? Most engines will bog when you hammer the gas if they arnt warm enough. My sled was bogging aswell, the dealer ruled out the reeds and carbs, and every other option , and that it was probably a seal leaking in the case or somewere in the motor, because even the spray test isn't 100% for sucking air... So now I'm Doing the whole motor. might want to recheck your crank and seals to make sure. Who put it together?
 

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At what rpm does your clutch engage? starting my sons 583 when warm works much better with a open throttle. Bog could be a belt adjustment in secondary? is belt sitting low in secondary clutch (under top of sleeve)? Should (belt) be at least level and to 3/32" above clutch sleeve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe I mis understood but your sayin your using your teather to hold your throttle open? .... I'd say take advantage of the workout and hold it with one and pull with the other arm... I wouldn't risk having the throttle rigged like that but if it works I guess it's what works... But to the problem, are you letting the sled warm up a lot
Before you hammer the gas? Most engines will bog when you hammer the gas if they arnt warm enough. My sled was bogging aswell, the dealer ruled out the reeds and carbs, and every other option , and that it was probably a seal leaking in the case or somewere in the motor, because even the spray test isn't 100% for sucking air... So now I'm Doing the whole motor. might want to recheck your crank and seals to make sure. Who put it together?
Yeah... Maybe 10% is an exaggeration. The tach usually hits 3500 once it starts. I do let it warm all the way up before I take off on it. I did the motor, and I have worked on a ton of rotax pwc motors. So I guess it could be a seal, but I used new rotax ones and was super careful with the install. I also covered the rim of the seal with a very light coating of loctite gasket maker. I found that this holds and seals them around the cases better on install. The plugs both read a great color BTW.

Also check your carb and throttle cables Makin sure they arnt sticking
checked all the action on the cables and slides. All good

At what rpm does your clutch engage? starting my sons 583 when warm works much better with a open throttle. Bog could be a belt adjustment in secondary? is belt sitting low in secondary clutch (under top of sleeve)? Should (belt) be at least level and to 3/32" above clutch sleeve.
The clutch engages right around 4500. As far as the belt goes it sits 5/64 (alittle over 1/16) above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ttt please.

This is still an issue and I can't figure out why... Maybe it's just the way it is, and I could live with it. The only thing I don't like is being able to quick squeeze the throttle and have it take off. Instead it falls on its face and stalls....
 

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If it's idling at 3500 when cold or warm I would start looking for an air leak. Crank seal. carb boots or carbs not installed correctly in the boots. base gaskets etc.

Starting that sled with the throttle cracked is the norm, not the exception...
 

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It sounds like Im good then. I'll just a keep on a crackin'

The only thing is the bog at acceleration. I guess I play with the fuel/air screws.

Btw are these fuel screws or air screws.

In other words backing the screw out... Does that add more air or fuel?
 

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! 7/8 turns out on the air screws . It doesn't matter what you call them, it adjusts the fuel mixture at idle.

Adjust them either in or out until you get the engine to idle properly.
Anything past 2 1/2 turns will not have an affect. If the engine is stock you should get it to idle correctly in that range somewhere, if not the carbs may need some cleaning.

backing the screw out adds fuel. Richer..

2 1/2 turns out on the throttle slides . You need a manual
 

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The AIR screws control the idle air. Fuel is controlled by the size of the pilot jet. So if you screw it in it means less air -richer. Screw out more air- leaner.
 

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The AIR screws control the idle air. Fuel is controlled by the size of the pilot jet. So if you screw it in it means less air -richer. Screw out more air- leaner.
The screw does adjust an airflow. However, it is an airflow that drives a fuel flow. More airflow drives more fuel flow in the pilot system. Turning the screw out increases the airflow past the screw and richens the pilot system. At least thats the way I learned the Mikuni carb
 

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You could be right, BF!
 

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I know this is a few years old, but were you able to find a fix for this problem?

I'm having similar issues with my Formula 500
 
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