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I'm riding a 2013 Renegade BCX 800. Like most I really enjoy the deeper snow but on this sled has been a nightmare finding the nose of my sled will not rise out of the snow. I thought is was me so I have had a few buddies (who are very aggressive riders) take her in the deep snow. They have all said something isn't right can't counter steer. You really have to fight to maneuver in deep snow.

Limiter strap is all the way out an i have been playing with the shock settings. Anyone able to shed some light or offer some advice before this ski too falls victim to kijiji

Thanks in advance.
 

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Like it doesn't accelerate quick enough to get up on top of the snow? Could always change the gearing if that's the case

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Flip the stops up on the slide rails for the rear coupling blocks. It'll come up MUCH easier then.
 

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Buy a 2016 or newer 146 BCX, end of problem. The 137's with R-Motion don't have near the wheelie capability as the T-Motion sleds do even with limiter strap all the way out.
 

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Thanks for the reply gents.

The acceleration is fine, power is good but just when in deep snow the noses feels its pulling down more than i'm use to. Maybe its coming from Alberta and riding Revelstoke/Sicamous on a summit to the prairies and riding a cross over. I know BCX and summit are to very different sleds BUT.

As for the gears i will look to see what they are set at. My Coupling blocks are the adjustable ones that are gauged from 1-4. I have played with those but don't think i have placed it to 1 yet so thanks for getting me thinking about that. I have found some literature and it appears that setting 3-4 are to keep the skis on the ground.

P.S Wish i had the money to buy the 146 BCX lol
 

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Clutching helps a lot, gears too drop two teeth on the small sprocket and you will have way more bottom end but will lower your top speed, sprockets are pretty cheap too, quote me if I'm wrong just trying to help
Cheers!

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You were used to riding and uncoupled skid in the mountains on your summits the backcountry skid is coupled. Huge difference for getting up on top of the snow

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Limiter strap at the last hole, DJ clutch kit, geared down 21/45, coupler blocks on 1. Skis up whenever I stab the throttle.
 

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Could try wider skis, full skid plate, soften center spring/shock, coupling blocks at 1, flip the coupling block stops up, lower gearing.

I ride an '08 TNT with the stock 1" ripsaw track, & can get it to lift the front end up on the snow & keep it there without a ton of throttle in 2-3' of very soft snow. I upgraded from the stock pilot 5.7s to the pilot 6.9s, have a full skid plate, & the Doo a-arm protectors giving more flotation, & have my blocks set at 1 with the stops up, & center spring with just slightly more tension than just keeping the spring in place. The theory behind the soft spring is that it allows the front of the skid to start climbing up on the snow more easily, rather than trenching. I can't say that'll help keep the front end up so much, but there's some ideas to tinker with for a start.
 

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how much do you weigh?

try some risers

adjust the suspension the other direction - stiffer if need be.

ignore what other people say adjust for you only

what track?

try leaning forward - I know hard to doo
 

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You can do all the things mentioned above and it will still be marginal at best for lifting the nose if you have a coupled suspension in your BCX. The R motion skid is designed to keep the skis down on the trail for steering control, not up in the air for powder riding. I have a 900 Renegade with 1.75 paddle track, wider skis, lower gearing, and the coupling blocks flipped back out of the way. Its still very difficult to get the nose light in the powder. It will wheelie on hard pack when it hooks up. I would like to find a summit skid for a reasonable price and try it on my sled. Its all about the suspension doing what its designed to do.
 

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You can do all the things mentioned above and it will still be marginal at best for lifting the nose if you have a coupled suspension in your BCX. The R motion skid is designed to keep the skis down on the trail for steering control, not up in the air for powder riding. I have a 900 Renegade with 1.75 paddle track, wider skis, lower gearing, and the coupling blocks flipped back out of the way. Its still very difficult to get the nose light in the powder. It will wheelie on hard pack when it hooks up. I would like to find a summit skid for a reasonable price and try it on my sled. Its all about the suspension doing what its designed to do.
Hmm never had an issue run the dealer strap and 2 holes center spring at 3 fronts at 2 to 4 depending on trail conditions stock gearing and clutching same as yours I believe 1.75 powdermax never had an issue also should have the ds2 skis stock like this one. Coupler blocks help if low setting but should not matter. How's your belt? Clutch sheaves clean? The gif is from dead stop let off over the driveway the other pic is on a lake
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2-1/4" track
21/45 gearing or lower (I ran 21/49)
Good clutching like Dynamo Joe
Suspension set soft for weight transfer
Coupler blocks on 1; rubber stoppers flipped up helps, definitely not night & day.

Coupled skids stink for wheelies & transfer, at least when compared to uncoupled in deep snow.
 
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