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2007 Mach Zx
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hi everyone
Nice and warm outside the sleds never ran better.
Just purchased a 2007 Z.
I'm the third owner.
This sled has been well cared for and is in showroom condition. The machine came with all repair receipts and records since new.
The sled has 13500 miles on it. Based on the items replaced over the years it's pretty much just the chassis that has the mileage.
The original owner completely had the motor replaced in 2009 at 4500m. And various chassis parts. The second owner replace the crank with an OEM a couple years ago just as a prevents measure. The second owner also re-ringed as well. The second owner took the motor apart every other year and replaced the isoflex/performed inspections etc. The second owner had no issues at all with the sled for the 7 years of ownership. The second owner made mention that if it wasn't for the bad history on these he would have never thought it was bad.
So concerning the problems. The second owner used a nylon over the intake and never reported any belt dust issues. The low pressure fuel pump was replaced 10 years ago but is still in its original location.
Everyone here is extremely knowledgeable. Just asking for best advice on how to keep the Big Z going for years.
Also this machine is 100% stock trim.
Thanks everyone
Hi everyone
Nice and warm outside the sleds never ran better.
Just purchased a 2007 Z.
I'm the third owner.
This sled has been well cared for and is in showroom condition. The machine came with all repair receipts and records since new.
The sled has 13500 miles on it. Based on the items replaced over the years it's pretty much just the chassis that has the mileage.
The original owner completely had the motor replaced in 2009 at 4500m. And various chassis parts. The second owner replace the crank with an OEM a couple years ago just as a prevents measure. The second owner also re-ringed as well. The second owner took the motor apart every other year and replaced the isoflex/performed inspections etc. The second owner had no issues at all with the sled for the 7 years of ownership. The second owner made mention that if it wasn't for the bad history on these he would have never thought it was bad.
So concerning the problems. The second owner used a nylon over the intake and never reported any belt dust issues. The low pressure fuel pump was replaced 10 years ago but is still in its original location.
Everyone here is extremely knowledgeable. Just asking for best advice on how to keep the Big Z going for years.
Also this machine is 100% stock trim.
Thanks everyone
 

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It sounds like you are off to a good start. The 1000 SDI is in my opinion a 10,000 mile engine that requires no engine internal service. This is of course if it is always running right, good crank balance and alignment, good clutch balance and operation (primary and secondary), no fuel issues (quality and flow), no exhaust valve issues, no major over heating nor repeated or extended overheats, no electrical issues, enough Isoflex and oil. The highest that I found through another member on this forum was 15,000 miles.

Your 2007 already has the upgraded ECM ground collector. There are a few other electrical appliances that have the grounds running to this collector, so this was a nice upgrade from BRP.

There different approaches to the reliability of the 1000 SDI. The one that I chose when I first joined DooTalk was to make a list of all the <must do reliability mods>. On Feb 18th of 2012 I came to my senses to realize that I did not even understand any of these mods. Later in that year I met my RX7MachZ who became my sponsor and explained to me the ins and outs of the 1000 SDI. At the time he was running a number of reliability mods himself such as pods, a fuel controller, a Wideband, a fuel pressure gauge, a fuel pump mod, and a bunch of wiring mods. After 8 years he is down to one mod on his #3 sled in his fleet - his preferred fuel pump. He does use a voltage gauge and had adjusted the oiling. He also does check fuel pressure and clean the injectors himself at the beginning of each season. Last season he managed 5,000 miles like this.

I think the point he tried to make for himself is that the 1000 SDI was and still is a good solid engine that first needed to be well understood before getting wrapped up too far in <reliability mods>.

I see no issue with mods per say, but I have qualms with suggesting a long list that most are not required and add complexity not to mention additional points of failures. I don't consider gauges as mods since they are passive. Both RX7MachZ and I have come to the conclusion that a voltage gauge is a needed gauge for all sleds, 2S and 4S alike. If I was only allowed one beef with BRP, that would be it. If I was allowed two, then I would add lack of good information that can be applied to our older sleds. For example the 800R E-TEC from model year 2012 and on has additional balance between the crankshaft and primary clutch that is poorly explained. The engine can be fully rebuilt and given tons of oil and Isoflex, but if the crankshaft is too far out of balance with a 10 thou runout, and the primary has 10 thou in-case runout on the shaft and 25 thou on the sheave, and the secondary has 60 thou on the sheave, and add the belt temps always above 200F, then I can't see the engine reaching 5,000 miles. The point is everything needs to work well, not just the fuel pump.

My advice is, before getting carried away with any mods, take the time to learn the technology behind your 2007 Mach Z RT 1000 SDI. Then learn how to diagnose the main systems. Also learn to appreciate the number of miles from the first and second owners, which you undoubtedly have. I think there is much to learn from the second owner. Keep in mind that there are different approaches and much we don't know for certain.

Seeing the history, I think you did a good buy.
 

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First thing to do is find dial indicator, compression tester, vacuum pressure gauge, build a fuel pressure gauge and a setup to clean the injectors. You have access to the majority of the Shop Manuals right up to 2019, so no need to buy any of those. We also have access to a whole bunch of other helpful documentation from BRP. You will run out of time before documentation :) Just be weary there are a lot of mistakes to take note from the Shop Manuals including torque specs, and same with the DooTalk FAQ, so double check everything if you are not sure.

Ever since the G4 850 BRP has a neat tool to measure the in-case runout on the pto stub. I have yet to see if it would work on our RT, so I need to remember to order one tomorrow. You also need all the tools to diagnose the engine such as Mityvac vacuum/pressure pump and coolant test cap. You also need the clutch tools that can be purchased as a kit from C&T Powersports that I linked to his REV section.

The sled appears to be working right, so it may be difficult to find a good reason to buying a whole bunch of tools. The reason is you asked how to keep the Big Z going for years. The best way for this is to make sure it keeps running right. Having a sled that has been well taken care of and proven to work is the perfect opportunity to take measurements. Don't worry if the crankshaft appears a little further out of spec. I actually expect it to be higher than the maximum shown in the shop manual. Instead, just worry about taking a snapshot. If something happens like an exploding belt - which you should not let happen - then you take the measurements again with having prior a point of reference to compare.

Any time you go to re-torque a bolt, first put a sharpie mark as a reference. When disassembling an engine always mark the position of the bolts, especially the head bolts. Before removing a head, drain the coolant from the coolant pump. Your Rotax 995 is a rare engine that has an actual drain plug for this.

The Mityvac pump is used to check the proper functioning of the check valves for the oil injection, fuel and oil tanks. Those things must have worked on your sled otherwise it would not have survived, but overfilling the tank during storage can contaminate the fuel tank check valves and lead to an engine failure on the first ride of the season.
 

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2007 Mach Zx
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57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow that was an awesome and well educate reply. I totally agree. Before I joined the forum I had read quite a bit of info from yourself and a few others. I will get a service manual for sure (as I have many for everything) and keep up the understanding. I was so fortunate to have that second owner pass along all his advice. This is such a nice machine. I’m a mature rider now so most of my trail speeds are around 30-40mph with the odd speedy run (my oldest son has a 2007 apex).
 

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2007 Mach Zx
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow that was an awesome and well educate reply. I totally agree. Before I joined the forum I had read quite a bit of info from yourself and a few others. I will get a service manual for sure (as I have many for everything) and keep up the understanding. I was so fortunate to have that second owner pass along all his advice. This is such a nice machine. I’m a mature rider now so most of my trail speeds are around 30-40mph with the odd speedy run (my oldest son has a 2007 apex).
 

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2007 Mach Zx
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Also Daag44 thanks for those awsome tips. The compression on the Z is 150psi cold both sides.
You must have a good running Z as well. Honestly the only thing that I was thinking of moving is that fuel pump. Possible adding the unifilters as well as the nylon over the intake. The motor is so smooth now I could put a cup of coffee on it while it idles.
 

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I am not sure that I can help with the air filtration. The time that I used a sock filter I did find it caught fuzz from going through dried-up tall weeds, yet I removed it in favor of simplicity. There are a number of ways to approach the belt dust. One of them is to lower the amount of belt dust that gets generated from misaligned clutches and worn clutch parts. I also don't ride all that hard, so there isn't all that much belt dust for me to worry about. I make sure to give it plenty of oil and no worry about it.

2005 Mach Z 1000 air box
Started By David1964, Jan 03 2021 11:12 PM
 

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Also Daag44 thanks for those awsome tips. The compression on the Z is 150psi cold both sides.
You must have a good running Z as well. Honestly the only thing that I was thinking of moving is that fuel pump. Possible adding the unifilters as well as the nylon over the intake. The motor is so smooth now I could put a cup of coffee on it while it idles.
You must consider the existing recipe for success on your machine. She is already a runner, evidence by the miles. I'd make sure the clutch and secondary are still aligned well, make sure the air box horn seals to the door properly and call it a day.
 

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If you can see my signature, scroll down to picture. By the way you probably don't want to be scrolling past my signature each time, so you can X it out and turn it back on at a later time from your profile.
 

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Also Daag44 thanks for those awsome tips. The compression on the Z is 150psi cold both sides.
You must have a good running Z as well. Honestly the only thing that I was thinking of moving is that fuel pump. Possible adding the unifilters as well as the nylon over the intake. The motor is so smooth now I could put a cup of coffee on it while it idles.
Add the filters. Leave the fuel pump alone, if it fails then deal with it. Feed it good fuel and good oil, keep it stored in a dry, non humid place to minimize corrosion, and keep a good battery in it. Clean and maintain the clutches and every thing else, like any other 15 year old snowmobile and enjoy it. :righton :righton
 

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2007 Mach Zx
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the positive advice and encouragement. The Z is all polished and cleaned as well as a good fogging for the summer. I put some stabilizer in the fuel as well. Now I have a service manual printed so I will check and grease. Like everyone has sail, take the time to get to know it. I have a clutch puller, so I'll clean and check those. Literally put a hand on everything. It's kind of a father son project so the summer is the best time. I realize these units seem quirky but I will obviously keep her 100% stock and driven responsibiliy.
In the past I've been able to have a 670 go to 24000kms all original. Then my 470 to 16000 km all original.
Heck when was much younger I managed to keep a full on modded little phazer to go to 16000km. That's another story. You double the power of a little fan and now your talking really touchy.
Well everyone enjoy the awsome summer weather. Nothing like a 90 degree day to being out the best sled discussions.
 

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A must check is the flow from the LP pump. I would be shocked to see it flow anywhere near the 30+ gph it is supposed to. What I believe is needed for our forum is some help from BRP to acknowledge the problems they found through warranty claims with their choice of LP pump. I have been dragging my feet on this one, because it is a complex problem with a very sensitive past for BRP. And I am still uncertain what I would like to see happen. I think there needs to be say 3 different options. BRP are the best people to present different ones and ask for their input. The single pump setup that deletes the LP pump is a no brainer. There was one problem with priming in the case of running out of fuel that I could not figure out until just recently, so that one may go back on the table. It is the dual pump setup that is a challenge to find a safe position for the pump other than under the engine, and for this reason I am not convinced that they can suggest a different position for the LP pump.
 

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2007 Mach Zx
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Your 100%. On the pumps. The low pressure is the concern. There is no feedback on the fuel system to the computer. Fully open loop. It would sure be nice to at least have a flow switch in line with the LP system linked to the ignition. The second the flow decreases past a set point kill the ignition. It would of course be unnerving to have that happen but it would save the motor. Correct me if I'm wrong but if the high pressure pump didn't function properly you would notice it or it wouldn't even operate.
The LP on this machine is 12 years old so I think I'll flow test it but also simply replace it. Cheap insurance. Which pump do you recommend.
 

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Shortcuts......

I am impressed that you figured out how to post pictures without shortcuts! Don't be fooled with the easier methods as there are thousands of lost pictures on DooTalk from those who promoted the shortcut methods. Do it right the first time and it will pay off in the long run. I still refer to pictures that I posted as far back as 2013 to help me remember where I was at and the progress that I made. I first joined DooTalk back in Oct of 2011 from the fear given by my local group for buying an RT. If I had an once of smarts then I would have posted like you did and hopefully get the help that I needed from guys like BlueMax. I have no regrets since I got much out of the experience and I was in a position to pay the price of learning what I needed on multiple levels. The biggest lesson was about the conspiracies that BRP had designed the engine in a way that was destined to fail. I kid not that if anyone happens to be convinced of such a conspiracy, it literally takes years of effort to work through it. This is the rabbit hole that is best to avoid. The worst part is that it divides, and worse polarizes those of us who contribute on this sub forum.

The best way that I know how to fight against these things is to share our thoughts and keep participating. Please do not stop posting just because we may not agree among ourselves. Regardless of what you read, please keep plugging away at your sled while sharing your thoughts on this open forum, especially your own thread. Writing is one of the keys. We can read all we want, but until we write what we understand at the moment, then the reading has little effect. Writing is the upmost expression of learning, so if you want to learn about the 1000 SDI, then you need to do the work and write it out. There are no shortcuts.
 

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Feedback on the fuel system

Polaris does employ a fuel pressure feedback on their Patriot 850 snowmobile. They have also added fuel pressure dampeners to the fuel rail which began years prior to the 850. I have no clue why BRP hasn't done the same with the fuel pressure. All that I know is that the use of a fuel pressure gauge on the 1000 SDI began when one prominent member on this forum had a LP fuel pump failure in the middle of a lake.

RX7MachZ and I have been working this issue for the past years based on our own experiences, along with an acknowledgement of the lake failure was a real issue. So far the best conclusion we could reach was making the fuel system more reliable/robust to not need a fuel pressure gauge. While it remains a difficult subject, I firmly believe that we made head way with the reliability/durability of Posi-Flow pump which has shown to be a large fail. Hence why I would like a confirmation from BRP that they did find it was not a good pump for the application.
 

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BOSS Seat

Your newly 2007 Mach Z X with all the original red is a really nice sled!

The RT is the equivalent to a Generation 1 REV. If you have any trouble with your knees or hips riding a Gen1, then please consider spending the dough on a taller Boss seat (click the link). RX7MachZ loves his stock seat, while I despise it to no end. It hurts my knees and thighs so much that I hate it with a passion. A taller seat does need a taller riser to raise your arms back to a normal position, and longer Summit RT throttle cable to fit the taller rise. It also needs a taller windshield such as what I used from my Renegade RT. It went from I hate riding these sleds to enjoying them.
 
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