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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had to replace the clutch side engine brace on my sled, so upon removing the jack shaft I decided to replace the bearing that sits in the brace on the QRS side. I bought the bearing at Royal Distributing but the only 6008 bearing they had was the 2RS, would that be ok to use instead of the V rated 6008 that they come stock with or will it have to much rolling resistance to it? Has anyone used this bearing over the OEM V rated?
 

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6008 2RS is perfect, I've been using them for years without issue. The V stands for a different type of rubber seal and it has nothing to do with the rolling resistance of the bearing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited by Moderator)
6008 2RS is perfect, I've been using them for years without issue. The V stands for a different type of rubber seal and it has nothing to do with the rolling resistance of the bearing.
thanks, was just a little worried doing some of my research on the different Bearing ratings. shows that the 2RS is a rubber seal and reduces Bearing speed. given that this bearing has 140 hp forcing it to spin, lol its probably little chance that there will be that much resistance but it was more the extra heat that it may cause and if it would effect the longevity of the bearing.

how often do you replace them? my sled has 12700 km on it and the original bearing seemed to still be smooth and tight
 

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I replace my jackshaft bearings @ 6000ish miles with a good quality bearing such as SKF, NTN, *** etc..... The bearing that you pulled out should have read 6008 2RS-V. In other words, it as well had two rubber seals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I replace my jackshaft bearings @ 6000ish miles with a good quality bearing such as SKF, NTN, *** etc..... The bearing that you pulled out should have read 6008 2RS-V. In other words, it as well had two rubber seals.
its a KML bearing, we'll see how it work, lol hopefully i don't have a failure while riding
 

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Others have mentioned going 20000 kms without issue on this bearing. Not sure if I would go that long before replacing. I hate breakdowns!. I would use a quality replacement bearing as others have suggested. Names like NTN, SKF, *** etc. Spend a few extra bucks and only do it once for the life of the sled.
 

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This is a interesting topic! The discussion so far has defined the difference in the seals. No discussion on the capability of the bearing itself, other than it's size 6008.

Seems plausible that there are different load ratings, lubricants, materials and ball/race quality available from the manufacturer. How do you know what your getting when those specification are hidden from the retail buyer. You would think that BRP engineering has defined more detail specifications for BRP purchasing to source the bearings they use and sell.
 

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Others have mentioned going 20000 kms without issue on this bearing. Not sure if I would go that long before replacing. I hate breakdowns!. I would use a quality replacement bearing as others have suggested. Names like NTN, SKF, *** etc. Spend a few extra bucks and only do it once for the life of the sled.
I believe time is an important factor in bearing life too. As moisture creeps into the bearing, corrosion occurs and then failure. Also amount of throttle impacts load on bearing. Just a lot of factors to consider.
 

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You are onto something here Saber. In recent years BRP has been using a different grease in the idler wheel bearings than what you would buy from a bearing wholesaler. I believe NTN is the sole supplier to BRP and their idler wheel and jackshaft bearings all contain grease that is water resistant and low temp. I tried to find spec. sheets from NTN but they weren't willing to share them as they said that they are made specifically for BRP.

I continue to use a 6004 or 6008 from NTN, SKF or ***. My thought process is that I change these bearings out long before their failure point as they are cheap and I'd rather do them in the summer than have problems trail side. In saying that, I'm good with having a bearing that is the correct size with similar grease to BRP specs. as they are usually 50% less in cost. You need to know that I'm not one to cut corners to save a few bucks, but I'm not convinced that the small tweaks that BRP has had the bearing manufactures do (such as the grease) is any better than what we've been using for years?

All in all, if you match the correct bearing number and it has 2 rubber seals you will be good to go is my approach. I believe MXZ-Man sells bearings for his M-F job so maybe he'll set me straight if I'm out of line on this one. lol

I do avoid the cheap chinese bearings and only purchase good quality bearings from my local bearing suppliers.

This is a interesting topic! The discussion so far has defined the difference in the seals. No discussion on the capability of the bearing itself, other than it's size 6008.

Seems plausible that there are different load ratings, lubricants, materials and ball/race quality available from the manufacturer. How do you know what your getting when those specification are hidden from the retail buyer. You would think that BRP engineering has defined more detail specifications for BRP purchasing to source the bearings they use and sell.
 

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This is a interesting topic! The discussion so far has defined the difference in the seals. No discussion on the capability of the bearing itself, other than it's size 6008.

Seems plausible that there are different load ratings, lubricants, materials and ball/race quality available from the manufacturer. How do you know what your getting when those specification are hidden from the retail buyer. You would think that BRP engineering has defined more detail specifications for BRP purchasing to source the bearings they use and sell.
from the research i've read on the bearings, there is no load differences, the seals are what are different. the different Seals add different rolling resistances, V have a less resistive seal then the RS but don't seal as well and the Z is a steel seal which has the least resistance but the lowest resistant of the sealed bearings

if you're worried about the type of grease packed in the bearings, you could always remove the seal and repack it with Lucas Red N Tacky, they make a really good grease and considering its rated for trailer axle bearings, anything our sleds throw at it it should be able to take
 

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Many differences, seal - single lip vs double lip, rubber, steel, silicone etc, Grease for low speed, high speed, low temp, high temp. Bearing quality as far as tolerance - precision, non precision. Bearing over all use, low speed or high speed, low load, high load. That is why you should replace with same part number or rating/classification, research for your particular use. Not just bearings anymore! LOL

Bob
 

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Maybe some day a engineer in the bearing industry will chime in and straighten this out for us.

In the mean time, another why to look at what bearing to use is where you are going to use it. Idler wheels where a failure will not strand you, use anything.

drive train bearings like the drive shaft where failure will stop you, Use the best available which is likely BRP sourced.
 

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First let me say I am by no means a bearing expert but I do have a little history with them. :)

That said, you're all right!

NTN is our #1 bearing line and they are a super high quality piece. The V at the end of the part number indicates it's a special. In this case I would guess it's the grease in the bearing, it could also be the internal clearances. Being an OEM bearing the only way I could find out what the special part was would be to have the engineering drawing on the bearing itself.

As far as the 2RS part, as 12/3 noted, that simply means "2 rubber seals". Z indicates a shielded bearing, which you do not want in your snowmobile jackshaft.

My pellet stove blower had 2 little cheap imported shielded bearing in it, they didn't last long and are now being replaced with 2RS bearings. In this case I went with Nachi as they were faster and easier for me to get my hands on. (For the 1-2 applications Ebay is a great place to buy bearings, BTW) When they get here I'll figure out what grease is in them and I may switch it out to something I'd rather have, or I may leave it as is. When I get the actual part number I can figure that part out.

Brand-wise, as noted, not all import bearings are junk but in a critical application I tend to stick to the brand name stuff. Don't be surprised though when you see some of the brand name stuff is also made in China. The SKF Explorer Series comes to mind. Peer bearing was always considered a second tier bearing as far as a brand name, however they were a good quality bearing - so much that SKF has now bought them.

As to the OPs question, the 2RS part is fine - thats what the OEM bearing was. The biggest thing I would question would be what grease is in the bearing itself, and possibly the speed rating, although 99.9% chance that part won't be an issue.

The the question about the possible load rating, that won't be an issue at all. From the NTN web site;

Load ratings don't really vary from among manufacturers, the methods used to calculate load ratings is different. Some manufacturers use the ABMA standard, some use the US Industry standard, some use equivalent dynamic load calculations. In general if the internal design is the same the load ratings will be equivalent.
 

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^^^^^^^^ Excellent information Mxzman :Cheers

Having almost 11,000 miles on my couch. I need to think about changing this bearing as well.
 
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The jack shaft bearing, I have had excellent results with just removing the seals, cleaning and repacking every other season. Now with drive axle bearings, they are subject to lots of moisture (Drivers Side) and should be inspected yearly for contamination (Moisture / Rust). I have cleaned and repacked drive axle bearings, but in most cases on inspection, discovered rust and replaced bearing. Chain case side will last life of sled if outer seal stays intact.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The jack shaft bearing, I have had excellent results with just removing the seals, cleaning and repacking every other season. Now with drive axle bearings, they are subject to lots of moisture (Drivers Side) and should be inspected yearly for contamination (Moisture / Rust). I have cleaned and repacked drive axle bearings, but in most cases on inspection, discovered rust and replaced bearing. Chain case side will last life of sled if outer seal stays intact.

Bob
i actually just ordered a new seal for the jackshaft on the chaincase and a new bearing lol, when i went to go put it back together the seal didn feel like it sat right so for my own peace of mind i spend the 20 bucks on a bearing and seal
 
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