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Nutshell (and that's all we're getting tonight, tired) - the new track is _good_.

I still don't know about groomed/packed trails. We ride groomed trails SO little here, and my opinion is pretty meaningless as far as that goes - I don't know what feels _good_ on packed trails.

That said, the SWT was sometimes "slithery" on groomers. Today, on the 1.75" track, it was not. Seemed great.

Only found one steep, soft hill. Picture attached. Steeper than it looks. Snow cover is thin at best, was nervous about rocks (like the one near my down-track - but at least that one is visible).

I'm PRETTY SURE I could have gotten the SWT up that on the old track. Probably.

New track, it was really, really easy. Effortless.

One other thing the new track does which the stock did not - on firmish windbuff, if you spun the track to try to get the sled on edge, the track just spun ON TOP of the snow.

New track will churn through the windbuff, letting the sled pop up on edge.

I often describe my XU as behaving like a "giant RevXP." It is clutched like a mountain sled, not a utility - engagement is at ~4500rpm or so, it hits pretty hard when the clutch engages. I've intentionally taken a lot of the "utility" out of it to suit my needs better, and it is working well.

Now it _REALLY_ feels like a giant XP. It really feels like a big mountain sled. It is still miserable on firm sidehills where you can't get the ski/track to break through. It is still gigantic.

It no longer is uncontrollable on steep descents.

Spinning the track to get it on edge is effective now - the new track moves a LOT more snow. Still a limited sample - not a ton of snow here yet - but the ease in which it ascended that short hill, well, yup, right answer. I like it.

I'll get the pics of the disassembly figured out tomorrow - I photographed the things that are different (for me), transmission, caliper.

fun fun. Just needs to snow now!

Iain

hill.jpg
 

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Ok, I have some questions.

What does this thing cost? Where do you get one? And is there a write up of anyone swapping out the track? IE what is all involved? I have swapped a many of tracks before. Just put on a 2.6 powerclaw on my M this weekend. I just changed the fluid on my 11 SWT and was curious the steps in swapping this over. That track is the cats meow and I wish my track was in worse condition.
 

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I got mine at snowcitymi.com - $800 USD shipped to my door.

It is a normal track change EXCEPT for the transmission, and brake, if you're not used to Rev-type sleds - the caliper bracket IS the PTO side bearing holder for the driveshaft.

Transmission is easy - take muffler out, footwell guard off, disconnect speed sensor, disconnect shift linkage, three bolts at the top of the transmission, one holds the oil tank, the other two attach to an aluminum bracket.

Then, four 13mm nuts hold the transmission to the tunnel. Remove. The transmission is "free" to come out now - wiggle it off the jackshaft and driveshaft, slide it out. It is tight, and a helper holding the driveshaft in place is a good idea.

trans1.jpg


Transmission ready to come out:

trans2.jpg


Transmission out:

trans3.jpg
 

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Then, the brake side. There are four Torx T40 bolts that hold the caliper to the tunnel - they bolt through the tunnel into a flange. The bearing gets sandwiched between flange and caliper mount. You have to spin the track/driveshaft enough to access the bolt heads through the larger openings in the rotor.

SkiDoo makes a puller to get the caliper off the bearing - seems that it sticks on the bearing over time. Mine wiggled off with minimal force, thankfully (new sled). From reading The Internet, the caliper/bearing being stuck together can be An Issue.

There's also a snap ring that holds the rotor onto the driveshaft. The Internet says you need to take brake pads out, which gives enough room to get the rotor out - I did not, left the pads in, it all cooperated.

brake1.jpg


Taking the shield off is not exactly rocket science, but I have a picture:

brake2.jpg


Snap ring off, caliper separated from bearing:

brake21.jpg


The little oval tab with the line pointed to it in the picture below is actually a hook - that's part of the flange which the caliper bolts thread into. You need to rotate the flange 5-10d clockwise (from this side) to disengage the hooks - there's two, another one 180d around the flange. Once you're at this point, remove skid, slide out old track, slide in new track, reassemble. The huge hole on the mag side that the tranny left is nice - makes it REALLY easy to get the driveshaft out. Once the new track is in, put the driveshaft through the tranny hole, PTO end through its hole, line up the tabs, rotate the flange so the bolt holes line up, bolt it back together. Really easy. The flange has a recess for the caliper - the caliper piston actually protrudes into the tunnel, the flange will only fit one way. It makes all KINDS of sense once you have it apart in front of you.

The manual says to replace the T40 bolts; was advised by SkiDoo Master Tech that they state "replace" due to threadlock - they're not stretch bolts. I cleaned, used blue Loctite, per his instruction. 18 foot pounds torque - it would be REALLY easy to strip the holes on the flange, it is delicate.

brake3.jpg
 

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Excellent post mannix! Lucky that you didn't need the tool to pull the rotor from the shaft. When I changed mine out I needed the tool. I ended up making one from some flat bar and three bolts. Basically two 1/4" bolts that go through the rotor and secured by nuts and washers between the rotor and chassis. Once the circlip was removed I had another piece of flat bar between the puller's center bolt and end of the shaft and started cranking. There's a bit of a pop when it lets go. A bit of anti siese in the spline when I put it back together.

I removed the brake pads when I took mine out, and actually didn't have to remove the gearbox. By removing the pads you can pull the rotor and then there is enough room on the pto side to slide the shaft out of the gearbox for removal. I think it kinda saved a couple steps from your description, but good on you for documenting another way. With the added weight of the SWT model, it may be much easier to do it with the gearbox removed. Either way, great post and glad you are happy with the track. I have no regrets with upgrading mine to the 1.8"

EDIT:

The puller I made looks similar to this one with the exception that the middle hole is not threaded. I just have a through bolt with a nut and washer inside the flat bar, ie. toward the sled. Basically made it from scraps around the garage.

http://www.dootalk.com/forums/topic/408619-brake-rotor-pulling-tool/?hl=+pulling +brake +rotor

I'd also note that the snap ring on the shaft is a bit of a bugger to get off with the snap ring pliers that have the interchangable heads. The spread on the pliers I have were just shy of what was needed to spread the clip. I ended up getting a set of "one piece" snap ring pliers with a 90 degree head from princess auto. Well worth the couple dollars I paid for them.
 

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Did not know you could slide it far enough out the PTO side to get it out of the trans - that's good to know!

No complaints taking the trans off, but yeah, it'd save :30 or so - some of the bolts on the trans are fiddly, and getting it back in takes some time - get it lined up on the d-shaft, wiggle a bit, get jackshaft lined up, wiggle more, then bam, it is on. Kinda like putting a manual transmission back into a car - it all SHOULD go...wiggle wiggle pry push pop! in. Ok.

It'd certainly be faster leaving the trans in place, and yeah, with the brake OUT of the way, I can see that. Live and learn!

Some of the springs on the muffler are a pain, too - I have the real SkiDoo spring puller, got it for my first Rev (the RT). I needed the length on that to go through from the front and grab springs.

Prior to that, I used a short, t-handle with a hook puller. Worked fine on old-school sleds.

The RT? I'm not sure it'd be POSSIBLE to do it without the Doo spring tool. ok, it'd be POSSIBLE, but geez - it was tricky even with the giant spring pusher-puller-twister, and I used all three - push, pull AND twist.

PSA - while you can get by with the shorty spring pullers, the big Doo tool is _awesome_ and worth every penny. I love it.

Iain
 

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I don't believe I removed the transmission when installing our ice ripper tracks from Camoplast in 2009 on a pair of Expeditions XUs
 

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Pleasesnow,

A track any bigger than stock won't fit in most Yeti II machines unless you are fan cooled or do serious cooling mods. I had a '10 SWT that I actually removed the bulkhead tunnel cooler, as I run ice screws and the 1/4" of clearance BRP gave us on those wasn't cutting it. Used some XLT runing board coolers to replace it. If one did something like that, they could fit a taller track in there..
 

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lain , nice job of the pictures and the how to. I ordered my track today.Will be picking up the new SWT next week.

Should I remove the gear case or try the way Snow Terrorist did?
 

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With what SnowTerrorist said, I'd be inclined to remove brake pads, get rotor out of the way, remove caliper and do it without removing transmission.

Once the caliper is off, the flange the pinches the bearing is pretty floaty - I can easily see enough room to get the shaft out without removing the muffler/trans.

Iain
 

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Nice write-up :biggrin_old:
 

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No meaningful miles - some firmish packed roads today, but nothing hard enough to detect squirm or deep enough to confirm it is The Answer in deep snow.

Weight - totally unscientific, did not weigh either one, but I think it is actually heavier than the stock track.

So far, though, I really like it - sled hooks up FAR better on soft-but-packed snow.

Iain
 

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Rode it again today. REALLY liking the track.

We were at this location (Front Range/CO) on Thursday - about 8" new then. About 8" new again this morning. Maybe 2' in the past week, on top of whatever was there. No sleds have been up this hill all year.

Moderately steep, not a terribly long pitch, not so much impressed with the fact that the sled got up it - I could have gotten the stock track up it too.

The short-lugged track would have taken a couple of tries.

The short-lugged track would have made me (the sled) work for it - throttle on the bar, working the sled pretty hard.

The short-lugged track would NOT have let me take two people/two pairs of skis (close to 500# on the sled) up it first shot, 1/2-3/4 throttle, no drama, no issues. Just drove right up it.

Sold. Not sure how the taller-lugged track does on packed roads (like PACKED - our "packed" roads are normally still soft enough that the full 2.5" of the mountain sled paddles still penetrate), not sure how it does towing, not sure about a lot of things.

I _AM_ sure the taller-lugged track kicks butt ascending deep, untracked snow. It won't highmark with a modern mountain sled, no way, but the SWT's capabilities just _skyrocketed_ when it comes to ascending/breaking trails. For my western skiing brethren, this track REALLY makes utility sleds viable and 100% useful for backcountry access machines.

For giggles, I drove the SWT down and back up the path I'd made. We parked the SWT, skied a run - took about an hour of hiking/recon/skiing, then drove the mountain sled up to retrieve the SWT. In that hour or so, the path had set up into a WONDERFUL road - firm, supportable, just drove the XM up the hill to the SWT. No problems. Magic.

trackworks.jpg
 
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