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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First, I want to especially than suv1 for all the advice you give. Wow. Your help and well written posts are amazing.

Second, I'm new to sledding, and have fallen in love with the sport. Purchased a "almost totally wrecked" 2014 Skandic, and for for a Corona Virus Project, doing what is turning into a full re-build. But hit a road block.

I'm stumped. And almost embarrassed to ask. How do you take off the front seat skin?

I've got the portion off by the fuse box. And the fasteners at the front, with the "sewed in" plastic strip that locks into the front "dash". About to pull the box behind the seat, but was looking for some guidance before I started ripping things apart.

And yes, I've designed, built, rebuilt automotive engines, and know my way around a track. But, this seat has me perplexed.
 

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There are plastic "shims" along the lower edges of the seat cover that slide into the channels along the top of the tunnel - if you're looking at the fusebox, down a smidge to the right, you'll see where the cover wraps into the channel.

They can be a pain to get out - I get an awl behind the plastic thing, then grab with pliers and carefully pull it out - it is REALLY easy to damage the cover, so be careful, it takes a bit of force.

You don't need to take the box off to get the seat/cover off. Putting it back on, otoh, the box has to at least be loose and moved out of the way.

There are four Torx headed screws - two on the sides at the back, two at the front just under the bodywork, iirc. Once those four are out, dig the front flap of the cover out, then it is just a matter of convincing the ones on the sides to get out - spread the channel a smidge with a screwdriver, try to slide it fore/aft, etc.

That's it, though. They don't act like they want to come out.

The cover is held to the foam by a flap that goes through a slot in the foam in the rear passenger area - the flap goes through the slot in the foam, one side of the flap has a plastic thing that slides through a slot in the cover - twist the plastic 90d, get it through the slot in the cover, then pull it through the seat;

It is not a whole lot of fun, but once you get the side plastic bits moving, it comes right off.

Iain
 

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It wasn't hard for me on my '18 SWT but I had somebody sit on it while I peeled the channels away around the bottom. I cut the foam down in the seat area so I wouldn't keep sliding forward. There is a thread in here on it and I think I have the pictures also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks everyone. There was grit packed into the track and the hold down rail was partially compressed against the strip on the skin. I went down the side with a flat screw driver and lifted the rail up, then slid a paint scraper along the tunnel - the whole way - to make sure the seat was free on the bottom. Used the idea of having my wife sit on the sled while I pried out the strip. Started with the side with the fuse box. You were correct, a lot of wiggling was the trick. :- ) But, yes, removed the back box before it was all over.

I'm keeping pictures of the different stages of this "Restore". It is heart breaking that a 2014 sled would be in this condition. But has become my "Corona Sequestered Project".

I'm in the last stages of re-installing the massive front tubular steering arm. One ski tube had been bent back about 10 degrees. I had a body shop put everything back to the original position, replaced the leg cushions, seals, welded up the holes in the pogo legs, and welded up the drive teeth in the steering arms, ground and polished them all back to spec. New shocks, wide stance add on, and more hours than I care to mention. Added a grease fitting to the lower steering tube cushions, the two rubber rings were toast and figured a regular shot of grease would not hurt. (I threw away the list I was using to track how much I was spending.) Now that the back seat is out, I can get the tank out, clean it, and keep moving back. :- ) Thanks again !!!

Jack
 

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Thanks everyone. There was grit packed into the track and the hold down rail was partially compressed against the strip on the skin. I went down the side with a flat screw driver and lifted the rail up, then slid a paint scraper along the tunnel - the whole way - to make sure the seat was free on the bottom. Used the idea of having my wife sit on the sled while I pried out the strip. Started with the side with the fuse box. You were correct, a lot of wiggling was the trick. :- ) But, yes, removed the back box before it was all over.

I'm keeping pictures of the different stages of this "Restore". It is heart breaking that a 2014 sled would be in this condition. But has become my "Corona Sequestered Project".

I'm in the last stages of re-installing the massive front tubular steering arm. One ski tube had been bent back about 10 degrees. I had a body shop put everything back to the original position, replaced the leg cushions, seals, welded up the holes in the pogo legs, and welded up the drive teeth in the steering arms, ground and polished them all back to spec. New shocks, wide stance add on, and more hours than I care to mention. Added a grease fitting to the lower steering tube cushions, the two rubber rings were toast and figured a regular shot of grease would not hurt. (I threw away the list I was using to track how much I was spending.) Now that the back seat is out, I can get the tank out, clean it, and keep moving back. :- ) Thanks again !!!

Jack
Wow, it sounds like you plan to keep it for a while. Did the "having someone sit on it" trick help much?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
08SWT: Having someone sit on the seat as the side strip was pulled out probably helped. Since that was how I did the first attempt, not sure if it was key. I was concerned about ripping the fabric, so I was as cautions as possible from the start and followed the advice. Thanks for the question.

Jack
 

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I was concerned about ripping the fabric,

Jack
These covers are fairly durable/stretchy in the warm, you need to be careful all the same, i've had some crack/rip along where the plastic tab meets the aluminum locking channel.
 
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