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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
And spread the pliers, forcing the ring into the groove.

Be very carefuly with this so as not to slip and damage the bearing seal.
 

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Good job with the write up, I would have considered this the most basic job that exists when it comes to snowmobile maintenance, but after seeing and reading this post, there certainly is a right and wrong way of doing it.

For what it's worth, I use brake cleaner and a rag to completely clean out the brg and retaining ring cavities on the idler once the old brg is out, often using a chainsaw carb screwdriver to root all of the dirt/crap/rust out of the ring slot.

I then have a capfull of 10W30 on hand to dip my finger in and lubricate the brg area before pressing in a new brg by hand to start, and then pounding it in with the hammer and socket just like you do. I find that the oil really makes it a lot easier to get the brg started on re-entry by hand, perhaps that's what you're missing.
 

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Put the new bearings in the freezer; warm up the wheel in hot hot water while the bearings get cold and....

They drop right in
 

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It may be basic for me now, but I had no idea I could even replace the bearing in the wheels. I assumed if there was a problem you just bought a new wheel! :)

Thanks for the write up!
 

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Great job xmptsunami, a picture is worth a thousand words...that is how it's done....something I like to add though when installing the bearing back into the wheel you should only apply pressure on the outter race not on the inner race as you did, this can cause a nicks in the ball bearings reducing it's life, especially on cheaper bearings.
 

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Great job xmptsunami, a picture is worth a thousand words...that is how it's done....something I like to add though when installing the bearing back into the wheel you should only apply pressure on the outter race not on the inner race as you did, this can cause a nicks in the ball bearings reducing it's life, especially on cheaper bearings.
Ya... I always beat on the inner race and have not had any problems, but I do agree with you 100%.

I once had a plug made that was shaped like a T, when dropped into the bearing it covered the whole top surface and when you hit it, it would push on both races. I need to make some more of those.
 

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Great pics.. thanks for taking the time to do it.

A couple questions....

It seems you got some aftermarket bearings.. what is their size?

How easy is it to remove the wheels from the rear suspension? I'm more than comfortable with the procedure, as I've done it plenty with other tractors and such.

thanks

Jason
 

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How easy is it to remove the wheels from the rear suspension? I'm more than comfortable with the procedure, as I've done it plenty with other tractors and such.

thanks

Jason
The wheels come of fairly easily, note the ones with the plastic bushings sometimes can be a little stubborn, the rear axle is the ones you must pay close attention to cause the center wheel on many models like the WT and SWT they only slide one way on the aluminum shaft, one side is slightly larger and the wheel/bearing won't slide, I 've seen people try and pound the bearing of only to realize later after beating the shaft to smithereens it almost comes of by itself by the other side.
 

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The wheels come of fairly easily, note the ones with the plastic bushings sometimes can be a little stubborn, the rear axle is the ones you must pay close attention to cause the center wheel on many models like the WT and SWT they only slide one way on the aluminum shaft, one side is slightly larger and the wheel/bearing won't slide, I 've seen people try and pound the bearing of only to realize later after beating the shaft to smithereens it almost comes of by itself by the other side.
Shocking. Now who would do such a silly thing


Actually, it's the *bang* that the inner race makes when it pops under hydraulic pressure that usually has the greatest underwear-soiling effect
 

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I once had a plug made that was shaped like a T, when dropped into the bearing it covered the whole top surface and when you hit it, it would push on both races. I need to make some more of those.
Ya the wheel bearings are not as important as an engine bearing but is good to keep with the same routine.
 

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Shocking. Now who would do such a silly thing


Actually, it's the *bang* that the inner race makes when it pops under hydraulic pressure that usually has the greatest underwear-soiling effect
Including myself LB your not the first to do that and for sure you won't be the last!

Here's a picture of WT rear shaft where the center wheel goes, notice one side is larger than the other, the thing is with the wheels on it's hard to tell the differance!!!???
 

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Your supposed to change those bearings? To be honest I have never had a bearing changed on any of hour sleds nor had someone else do them. Our two 500's have more then 7000 miles and have never seen a new bearing. One even has its original shocks. Maybe this will be a project before the snow fly's down here.
 

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Ok... another newbie question... obviously (I guess) you can go into your BRP dealer and order/purchase these bearings at a premium price I'm sure. My question is: if somone wanted to order these bearings what would they ask for, that is how is the size/type measured? I'm sure I speak for all of us "inexperienced mechanics" when I say the info provided by the knowledgable members of this site and the utility forums in particular is greatefully appreciated!

Thanks,
Steve
 

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Ok... another newbie question... obviously (I guess) you can go into your BRP dealer and order/purchase these bearings at a premium price I'm sure. My question is: if somone wanted to order these bearings what would they ask for, that is how is the size/type measured? I'm sure I speak for all of us "inexperienced mechanics" when I say the info provided by the knowledgable members of this site and the utility forums in particular is greatefully appreciated!

Thanks,
Steve
The wheel bearings on all of our utility sleds are brg# 6205, dimensions 25x52x15 (mm, ID, OD, width).

If you search eBay or any Royal Distributing/Kimpex catalog for "6205 bearing" you'll get lots of hits. Buy them by the 10-pk sleeve to keep the costs down.

Some of the newer sleds (Rev, XP chassis) have replaced the 6205's with 6004's, which are smaller (20x42x12) and mount to a smaller shaft, which was part of the BRP weight reduction campaign when the Rev chassis started to phase in. Not only could the cross-shafts be reduced in size, but the wheels could also have a more narrow cross-section. Seems like a small difference, but there's no denying the end weight loss that was achieved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Thanks a lot guys for all the compliments. Hopefully more people will tackle this job themselves instead of paying the dealers to do it.

Thanks suv1 for the rear axle tip, I would hope I would have figured it out myself, but who knows, I've certainly done dumber stuff before.
 
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