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I just got my second 850 Etec but on my last one I constantly was having issues with the heated shield.

After doing some reading - it appears a lot of people have some issues with the fuses.

Anyone else having issues with the fuse or any other issues with their heated shield plug not working correctly?
 

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I just got my second 850 Etec but on my last one I constantly was having issues with the heated shield.

After doing some reading - it appears a lot of people have some issues with the fuses.

Anyone else having issues with the fuse or any other issues with their heated shield plug not working correctly?
I've used electric shields for many years. I have a lot of experience with them. I personally don't like console mounted plugs because they are always coming loose, filling with snow, difficult to locate in the dark, etc. What kind of issues are you seeing?
 

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I have had it happen a couple times. On 800 and 850. Not systemic so I believe it may be snow getting in the cord connectors on connect and disconnect causing a short. I carry spare fuses now.
 

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A lot of times the cap loosens just enough that the ground ring looses contact and you’ll have intermittent issues. Can use a metal nut or wire direct to battery
 

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The other thing you can do is get a small right angle RCA to straight RCA adapter....then leave that part plugged into the sled and unhook your helmet from the straight side of the adapter. This will put much less stress on the connection at the sled console. It's all the plugging and unplugging that stresses out the console receptacle.

...And carry extra fuses.
 

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In the 25 years I've been using electric I can only remember maybe 2x that I've actually blown a fuse. Once was when the male end of the cord fell on the running board shorting it. The other was when the console mounted plug-in came loose and the ground touched the center conductor. The key is to make sure that you never have a male plug that can fall and short. The helmet should have a cord with a male on both ends. One end plugged into the shield and the other end plugged into the female plug mounted on the sled. Always leave the cord plugged into the helmet and secure it with a clip so it can't pull out of the shield, fall, short out, and blow the fuse.

Another thing is cords. Buy high quality cords because they can and WILL fail. Just be prepared for it and always carry a spare cord. I usually end up repairing or replacing a cord a season. They get beat up! The nice thing about the newer shields is that they have an LED to let you know that you have voltage. I used to install LEDs myself for this very reason. Makes T-shooting a lot easier.

Lastly, I've never had a shield burn out, doesn't happen. Connections on the shield itself may fail but they don't burn out. Don't try to clean the inside of the shield with anything but a very damp rag and let it air dry. There is a conductive coating on the inside that will get ruined if you use a cleaner or other product on the inside. Outside? have at it!!
 

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Didn't I read that on the 2019 has a fuse that resets itself like a breaker.
You did read that. I installed 2 kits in 19 MY sleds. One kit came with an auto-fuse, the other came with a standard fuse?? I didn't think to look at part numbers at the time as they were different days.
 

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Is there a simple method to determine if the shield plug is actually working without connecting the shield to it?
 

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Is there a simple method to determine if the shield plug is actually working without connecting the shield to it?
You could use a voltmeter, although not handy on the trail. Just take the positive to the inside of the plug, and negative to the nearest ground. My newer Castle helmet unfortunately doesn't have the LED light to show its on, so I bought this years ago. Its great and I use it alot to troubleshoot.....its 21.95 which seems pricey. I swear I paid like $10 for it several years ago.

Heated Shield Tester
 

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You could use a voltmeter, although not handy on the trail. Just take the positive to the inside of the plug, and negative to the nearest ground. My newer Castle helmet unfortunately doesn't have the LED light to show its on, so I bought this years ago. Its great and I use it alot to troubleshoot.....its 21.95 which seems pricey. I swear I paid like $10 for it several years ago.

Heated Shield Tester
You're really going to want to put the ground of your meter or test light to the outside of the RCA plug and not just any ground because the ground connection of your helmet circuit can fail as well. Your cord needs to provide both the 12v and ground to your shield.
 

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Is there a simple method to determine if the shield plug is actually working without connecting the shield to it?
Voltmeter, or a 12vdc light bulb with an RCA plug connected to it.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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In the 25 years I've been using electric I can only remember maybe 2x that I've actually blown a fuse. Once was when the male end of the cord fell on the running board shorting it. The other was when the console mounted plug-in came loose and the ground touched the center conductor. The key is to make sure that you never have a male plug that can fall and short. The helmet should have a cord with a male on both ends. One end plugged into the shield and the other end plugged into the female plug mounted on the sled. Always leave the cord plugged into the helmet and secure it with a clip so it can't pull out of the shield, fall, short out, and blow the fuse.

Another thing is cords. Buy high quality cords because they can and WILL fail. Just be prepared for it and always carry a spare cord. I usually end up repairing or replacing a cord a season. They get beat up! The nice thing about the newer shields is that they have an LED to let you know that you have voltage. I used to install LEDs myself for this very reason. Makes T-shooting a lot easier.

Lastly, I've never had a shield burn out, doesn't happen. Connections on the shield itself may fail but they don't burn out. Don't try to clean the inside of the shield with anything but a very damp rag and let it air dry. There is a conductive coating on the inside that will get ruined if you use a cleaner or other product on the inside. Outside? have at it!!
Zoggan,

You mention buying high quality cords. I seem to have a bunch from over the years laying around, but have never really tested them either. Do you have any suggestions on the quality cords?
 

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What I'm looking for in a cord is one that looks and feels like rubber. Not the hard shiny plastic look/feel. I also like to use cords that are one piece from the visor to the plug in. Fewer chances for connector failures. Look at the one from Country Cat.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.countrycat.com/arctic-cat-4202-922-helmet-electric-heated-shield-coil-cord-modular-txi-pfp-crosstec&ved=2ahUKEwibiv7I0aLmAhULqp4KHeroCB8QFjAAegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw0wGlFvLB5lxlBiTzJPllVQ&cshid=1575690799788
 
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