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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok anybody who was following the forums knows that I have had two meltdowns in two years on two different machines. Both appear to possibly lead to water/ lean conditions.

I am trying to stop water from getting into the gas but...

I bought a covered trailer late last year and didn't have to use it until two weekends ago due to lack of snow around my house. I have noticed major condensation forming on the engine/tank/ and any metal parts of the sled. And I mean major condensation. You could soak a rag with one swipe. The trailer has a vent in it. Maybe it needs another? Anybody have any ideas to help stop condensation?
 

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Just bought into the enclosed trailer thing this year - all aluminum two-place drive in/drive out. I ordered what Triton refers to as "salem vents" as one of the options. They are simple vents located in opposite corners of the trailer that can be opened in one of two directions or closed completely.

On a recent below-zero trip, my friend and I both had starting issues with our sleds after they sat overnight in the trailer at -21 degrees with the vents closed. Having not had cold weather issues with eitherr machine before, we suspect condensation was to blame.

Since then, I still leave the vents closed during trailering when the road grime is being thrown around, but I now always leave them open when the trailer is parked. No issues since then, so I have to believe that venting is a must.
 

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Make sure you ALWAYS have your gas tanks plum full while in that trailer. Having a full tank allows no room for condensation in the tank!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It only has one 2 inch vent in the top right hand side. It has some kind of filter material in it. I was thinking another type of vent?
 

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I have the same 12 ft triton with the aluminum cover.....What I doo is to put a torpedo heater on a stand, and use a tie down strap to hold the cover just above the level of the heater. I then let it heat the inside and melt all the crap out of the skids and dry the trailer out. It works awesome. I do this after each trip, and they stay dry and toasty!

If I have one sled on, I will put the heater inside and keep the front acess door open along with the back.
 

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Here's what I've found:

1. Vents are a must, but aluminum skins will also get condensation going.

2. ALWAYS fill your tanks, and run some iso if you don't have ethanol.

3. Insulating the trailer helps greatly - with venting, and drying it out, makes huge differences. I did mine with double foil 1 inch iso and luan, every square inch. Foil to the cold side.

But if you have a wet trailer, or high humidity, you can still get the condensation. Heater works best, of course. Does nothing good for crank bearings, either. Just can't see it. Good posts.
 

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I have a 2 place enclosed drive on-drive off, and I installed a crank up roof vent, from an RV dealer, and then to keep out the snow and rain allowing it to stay open all year (it gets hot in the summer) I also picked up from an RV dealer a vent cover from a company called Maxx Air. I also keep the Gas tank full while in the trailer.
 

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one summer i didnt vent my trailer and machine rusted real bad
 

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formajim said:
Make sure you ALWAYS have your gas tanks plum full while in that trailer. Having a full tank allows no room for condensation in the tank!
[snapback]302872[/snapback]​
Always filled tank before I put it back in driveway...Never had any problems..That is the Answer...Thanks
 

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I have never worried about a full gas tank......I just dry out the trailer.......
 

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What if you were to install one of those solar panels with a fan attached?

Obviously you would need to mount it in a place where snow wouldn't sit on it, and you would need to clean for it to be effective, but it would then at least mean positive airflow through the trailer.

Perhaps mount it on a side of the trailer which faces the sun when parked?

I still think the best place for the sled for storage is in a well ventilated dry place like the garage. At least the heat and humidity gets moderated more than in a trailer. I like the insulation of the trailer idea, as it helps to moderate the temp fluctuations with the sun, etc.

I know people leave their sleds in the trailer all summer. How do they keep them in good shape?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I keep mine in my garage too but twice now when I have came home I left them in the trailer overnight. When I got up in the morning it was sunny and when I pulled the sleds out of the trailer into the garage they were soaked. They were not in the trailer more than 18 hours...
 

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Like was said always keep them full of fuel, vent the trailer well, even if it means propping the back up a couple inches with wood blocks. Buying a white or light colored trailer helps too.. Ive got a black one, been using it 11 yrs and not a problem, but they get real warm in the summer. When I store my sleds for the summer(indoors) I remove the belts and really coat all the metal on the sled pretty heavy with WD40.. over the summer it evaporates and the sleds look perfect come fall.
 

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TT670 said:
Like was said always keep them full of fuel, vent the trailer well, even if it means propping the back up a couple inches with wood blocks. Buying a white or light colored trailer helps too.. Ive got a black one, been using it 11 yrs and not a problem, but they get real warm in the summer. When I store my sleds for the summer(indoors) I remove the belts and really coat all the metal on the sled pretty heavy with WD40.. over the summer it evaporates and the sleds look perfect come fall.
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I have had a silver covered trailer for 5 years, with no problems. But was thinking it shoulda been black to heat up faster in the winter. But then never had major problems with condensation, so guess things will stay as they are.
Often leave the tank half full, never had probs there either. Sled stays in the trailer year 'round.
 

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Well, I put my trailer (24' vnose) in the garage, too, about 10 months out of the year, including winter if it's going to be sitting for a couple of weeks.

Covering the sleds keeps the dust down in summer. Also, I shoot lots of WD40 on any steel, arms, suspension, block, jugs, just completely avoid the clutches with it. If it's going to sit a week or more, regardless of time of year, it gets sprayed. Really helps keep a non-ceramic pipe/Y-pipe from rusting. Now, since we ride off trail extensively, our sleds get nicked up more than alittle - they are not show pieces, but absolutely no rust.
 

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gas tanks plum full while in that trailer..."
that is important but I never do it... too tired after the ride!

and I have all the condensation you talk about (espeically because my enclosure is black)

I use dry gas every other fill up and in 5 years, and 10,000+ sled miles I have not had any issue related to condensation... (or any other for that matter)

so don't worry about it-
 
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