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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read about the DooDoctor's floating QRS upgrade on here and have a couple of questions. 1) My sled only has @800 miles on it and is showing very little belt wear and I do not plan any clutching changes, so do I need the upgrade? 2) What is the difference between the DooDoctor's set-up and the one that you can buy from Ski-Doo?
 

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I've read about the DooDoctor's floating QRS upgrade on here and have a couple of questions. 1) My sled only has @800 miles on it and is showing very little belt wear and I do not plan any clutching changes, so do I need the upgrade? 2) What is the difference between the DooDoctor's set-up and the one that you can buy from Ski-Doo?
1. You don't need the upgrade, particularly if you are not showing any heavy belt wear in 800 miles if you have ridden it like you are going to ride it most of the rest of it's life, although things can change over time. Some of the doo sleds come from the factory very well aligned and some come from the factory so far out that you struggle mightly to align them. Part of it also has to do with your usage or duty cycle. Sounds like yours is fine.

Your sled being a 2011 etec, you don't have to get at the carbs frequently. And if you don't plan on any clutching changes or reed changes, such that you won't want quick access to your clutch or the reeds; there is not much point of getting the doo doctors treatment or buying the skidoo one by the sounds of your current belt life.

2. The Doodoctors set up is lighter as it uses the hollow stock shaft and probably stronger then the doo one due to the large OD of the stock shaft. Secondly, I would rather give my money to Brian as he is a super guy and is a big help and wealth of information to all that do business with him. You will be able to access clutch and other sled performance data from him and his side kick, they do a lot of testing. He is a real credit to the snowmobile industry and sledders. You don't have to change the shaft tower to use the doo doctors set up, which you have to put a new tower on for the doo shaft... and with the doo shaft, then you have to go out and get a floating spacer for $25 which comes with the doodoctors set up. The wealth of information he can provide is worth buying his floating QOS set up for. Brian is constantly in contact with guys like Big John, Kelsey etc.. .such that he is always up on the lastest engine and clutch info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
djm, THANK YOU! I have been a member on this site for less than a year, but I've been over at HCS since 2004 with hundreds of posts and your reply has to be the most comprehensive, intelligent, well written response I have ever received. No sarcasm, no B.S., just the an honest opinion backed by facts. Again, thank you.

A couple of things that I'd like to add. This is my first Doo after 16 years of riding Polaris. I chose to wait to purchase any tools to work on the QRS clutching until I decided that I needed to make changes.. So the cost of any required Doo specific clutch tools would have to be added into the equation. I have always reclutched and regeared my sleds based on my type of riding and the conditions in which I ride, which is basically semi-aggressive riding on U.P. groomed trails. I also didn't want to make any clutching changes to the sled until I had a chance to get some real miles on it. From what I have read here on Dootalk, although there are some very good clutch guys out there, and this may open a real can of worms, there don't seem to be any significant gains to be had with any clutching changes for my riding style. I'm not much of a drag racer, even though I live on a lake; off trail riding is not for me after hitting a buried stump several years ago and going over the handle bars, doing $3500 worth of damage to my one day old sled and getting a dozen stitches in my forehead where my shield broke and cut me; and I don't ride in the mountains. We ride 200-300 miles a day on groomed trails and back pack with a change of clothes and a toothbrush. I started this post because a good friend and riding buddy, who is a Doo die hard, said that this is the one thing that I should doo to my sled. I guess I just wanted more opinions.
 

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I agree, djm's post was right on. I was 17 years on Polaris, last several waiting for some thing of quality to replace edge chassis and finally gave up. I also gave up on HCS a few years back, DOOTALK seems to be a superior site for accurate info and no BS.

Not all XP's experience the need for the floating secondary even if common sense says BRP should have done it from the start. You may not need it as djm suggests. My sled was a hand built R&D sled, alignment was perfect. I bought the CTS tools and they are a good value.
 

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djm, THANK YOU! I have been a member on this site for less than a year, but I've been over at HCS since 2004 with hundreds of posts and your reply has to be the most comprehensive, intelligent, well written response I have ever received. No sarcasm, no B.S., just the an honest opinion backed by facts. Again, thank you.

A couple of things that I'd like to add. This is my first Doo after 16 years of riding Polaris. I chose to wait to purchase any tools to work on the QRS clutching until I decided that I needed to make changes.. So the cost of any required Doo specific clutch tools would have to be added into the equation. I have always reclutched and regeared my sleds based on my type of riding and the conditions in which I ride, which is basically semi-aggressive riding on U.P. groomed trails. I also didn't want to make any clutching changes to the sled until I had a chance to get some real miles on it. From what I have read here on Dootalk, although there are some very good clutch guys out there, and this may open a real can of worms, there don't seem to be any significant gains to be had with any clutching changes for my riding style. I'm not much of a drag racer, even though I live on a lake; off trail riding is not for me after hitting a buried stump several years ago and going over the handle bars, doing $3500 worth of damage to my one day old sled and getting a dozen stitches in my forehead where my shield broke and cut me; and I don't ride in the mountains. We ride 200-300 miles a day on groomed trails and back pack with a change of clothes and a toothbrush. I started this post because a good friend and riding buddy, who is a Doo die hard, said that this is the one thing that I should doo to my sled. I guess I just wanted more opinions.
Thanks for the compliments. My first XP experiences started with a 600 Etec... which probably didn't need the doodoctors QRS treatment either, but... I love to play with clutching and the 600 etec still uses the old V manifold stock reeds, so wanted to put V-Force threes in. Not that you can't take the shaft and secondary out pretty easily.. you don't even have to buy the tool to hold up the top gear and chain, you can actually use a long punch or extension... I have done that several times although the correct diameter tool from the guy on here or skidoo does work super. But it is so much slicker to pull the secondary just by pulling the belt and taking the bolt out of the end of the shaft. It is one of the first things I did on my 600. Heck the sled was up in TC and the doodoctor was just getting going so my bud dropped the whole sled off and doodoctor made the swap and did some testing with it and he and Big John got together and DD put a new helix with a different angle in for no charge. Just the kind of guy he is.

Just got another 2011 summit that got the doo doctor treatment this summer, it started life as a sport 500ss but now has a ported 700 in it compliments of BJ.

My favorite riding buds wife's 800R has never eaten a belt in 4500 miles, where as his sled would eat one ever 300.. we tried shimming it, could never get belt life over 500 miles until the doo doctor shaft and clutch was put in. Now it gets 2300/2500 miles a belt. Actually I don't believe he has failed another one.

What lake are you located on? I live on a small lake near fenton, I only use it for clutch testing. Ha ha.. I am just the opposite of you, all my riding is cross country, be it in the Traverse City area, the Seney area or out west in Wyoming or Montana where I grew up. I must confess I have been over the bars a few times, broken my throttle thumb twice landing in holes or over drop offs I didn't see! Head first into a pile rocks broken goggles, black eye and a couple of stiches a time or two. No serious sled damage yet... opps had a 99 Summit X go endo down a big hill in the middle of the gap in the snowy's, totalled it, but was able to ride it out very slowly.. and subsequently rebuilt it.

ha ha.. it's all good. Glad to see you on a doo for a while. Hope it turns out well for you!
 

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i have had it on a few sleds and it is nice.. and can help if the sled is way out of alignment. i would ride it for at lease 1000 miles and see if your getting crazy wear or it blows.. or if your clutches are super hot. like said before its also nice to get to the carbs but on an etec its not going to help in that way.. its a nice upgrade but only needed if your having belt issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
djm. I live on Commerce Lake and have always used the lake in the past the same as you do-clutch tuning. Most of my riding buddies still ride Polaris 800's so testing against them is always fun. Since my sled is pretty much stock; studs, carbides, braces, they use me to see how their "improvements" measure up.

Thinksno. I too got tired of waiting for Polaris to get their act together. I owned an 05 Fusion, which I never really had any issues with other than 14 recalls. First snowmobile that I ever brought back to a dealer for warranty work. But after seeing my buds Fusions have catastophic engine failures, I wasn't going to wait for mine to go down so I sold it. Bought an 07 600 IQ. That was the biggest engine Polaris offered that year (aside from the turbo) and it turned out to be a terrific sled, just a little down on power from what I was used to and preferred. I bought an 09 D800 and despite a lot of work, I could never get it to run cool. It was in constant detonation mode on the trails. (un)Fortunately it got stolen last summer along with my enclosed Floe trailer and my brother's Dragon as well. That's when I decided to make a switch to Doo.

So far, I could not be happier. The 800 etech MXZX is everything that a snowmobile should be; light, dependable, plenty fast for me, carves up trails with litttle effort, good on gas and oil, etc..
 
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