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Hey guys, so i live in saskatchewan Canada where our elevation is quite low, i ordered a 2012 freeride and the dealer told me that it comes with a high elevation kit in it and i told him to swap it out for a low elevation kit for around here and then i thought i would just put the high elevation kit back in for mountain trips. My question is would i actually need to do this? or would turning the clickers up be enough for the mountains? We are going to McBride BC so if anyone knows the average elevation of normal riding around there that would be helpful too. Our elevation around here is about 800ft i beleive. Any knowledge would be helpful, thanks
 

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You will definitely be missing out on performance if you just adjust your clickers for trips to the mountains. Changing your pins and spring is really easy. If you haven't done it before, search for C&T powersports. They are a dootalk sponsor and have all the tools you need and even how to videos.
 

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We're All Gonna Get Stuck!
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Lots of differences between riding at 800 feet and 8000 feet. (Which btw is about the elevation you will be riding.)

You need to change your clutching. Your sled will run if you don't, but not like it will if you do. I'm assuming riding McBride won't be an everyday thing for you, so you likely will want to get the most out of that new Freeride while you are there...

Also, and forgive me for saying this, but you sound like you have never been to the mtns before. It's good that you are asking questions about your sled and the terrain. But make sure you ask some questions about Avy's.
Are you Avy Savvy? Do you have the equipment? Do you know what you are up against? If you do, great... and just ignore this message... but if you don't, please do your homework. Enough people get hurt or killed in the mountains each year as it is. We don't anymore...

Trust me, if my wife keeps hearing about avy deaths, she's not going to want me going west anymore... and then I'll have to get a divorce, cause there's no way I'm quitting riding in the mountains. But I kinda like her so if you wouldn't mind, make sure you and your buds are up to the challenge.

Enjoy McBride.
 

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Yes this will be our first time to the mountains and we were looking at taking an avalanche safety course that is offered around here, havent found out exactly when yet but we sure arent going out there "blind" on what to do and what not to do, thanks for your concern haha.
 

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We're All Gonna Get Stuck!
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Good thinking. I sure didn't mean to sound like your Mother and beat you with a rolling pin, but just good things to think about before you go.

The sled and clutching stuff is good to think about too. So back to your original question, yes... get it clutched for the high elevation. Once you are up there, you can fine-tune with your clickers, but relying on just your clickers to get you to the right RPM probably won't work out too well. As mentioned, it isn't too hard to do, and it will be well worth it. Then... tell your buddies that they can just leave theirs the way they are, and you will kill them out there. HAHAHA.
 

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Ya you need to clutch for sure. Especially since you already will have all the high elevation stuff to do it. The tools are cheap and should be owned anyway to clean and check your clutches.

I used to live in Sask but moved out west here a few years ago and ride in mostly in Mcbride now. If your comin out this way and lookin for someone else to ride with let me know. I live right on hwy 16 3ish hours from mcbride.
 

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Where are you in sk? I'm in lloydminster and we are 2100 feet. Sure you don't mean 800 meters?
 

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Yea man maybe msg me closer to the time we go so I dont forget haha, we are coming up February 2,3,4 and there will be 5-6 of us, your welcome to come along. And I'm in humboldt sk, maybe I do mean 800 meters, not sure now haha.
 

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2010 Renegade X, Manatee is correct- YOU NEED AVALANCHE TRAINING AND EQUIPMENT! There are multiple things that will kill you on a snowmobile, and most people have accepted that helmets do more than keep your head warm, and tether cords are more than a "spare key". Avy training is another safety device, but one that you take with you everywhere-and one that you can share with other riders on the hill.

I recommend going to Lori's courses. I have taken the awareness LVL 1 and plan on LVL 2 this year (with level 2 you get to ride in to your training!!) and took a refresher course last year. All will likely agree, Lori puts on a great course and is passionate about YOUR safety.
Level 1.5 (Courses in Ed, Calg, and Saskatoon)
Level 2 (Courses in Kakwa, Golden and Valemont)

I cannot comment on other courses as I haven't taken any other than Lori's.

If you aren't going to obtain the training before your expected trip, leave your clutching for flat land. It will keep you in safer terrain (I say safer as there is always a possibility of disaster regardless of elevation). After you gain the tools to ride safely, then change your clutching to suit your riding needs!

I built a mountain sled out of a trail machine a few years back and rode in McBride with the wrong clutching (not for lack of trying). It ruined my trip. I had to ride to the $H|T outta the poor thing to get over simple hills. Long pulls were out of the question. For the few $$ it costs to get the tools required to Doo it yourself, you can't go wrong. As stated earlier, whether changing weights for a mountain (high/low elevation) trip or just to clean out the dusts after you shred a couple of belts the tools will become invaluable!

Take care, ride lots, and ride safe!!
Eli
 

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Yes this will be our first time to the mountains and we were looking at taking an avalanche safety course that is offered around here, havent found out exactly when yet but we sure arent going out there "blind" on what to do and what not to do, thanks for your concern haha.
I had a beotch of a time with my clutching. I bought Tom's who specializes in the mountain tuning. Calling up their shop, I was able to talk to Tom himself and get invaluable setup advice multiple times. No attitude and lots of patience. Really recommend his place based on my experiences so far.
 
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