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Does anyone know what they are using in 2015 sleds, esp with the 900ACE ?

I'm a skinny 175 lb-er and don't want to stiffen the ride up too much, but would love some more ski pressure and ground clearance......

Should I upgrade both the 2013 SWT 600 ACE and the 2015 SWT 900 ACE ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have asked this question of BRP several times and every time they seem to come back without an answer. The 2014+ Tundra Extreme appears to be the only strutter that indeed has stiffer springs. The rest, as far as I know, are using the 55lb/in ones. Regardless of rider weight if you plan on using one of these at all aggressively, I would recommend that you get the upgraded springs. This is in line with the feedback that i have seen on this site and in the field.
 

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The pogo can only come out from inside, pull the cap, steering arm...etc, sand down/grind where the holes are to a smooth surface, any burrs will make it harder to slide out, it's good idea change the seals/bushings while you're at it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here try these instructions:

You really have two options, you can do the job from the top, or from the bottom. It's less work to do it from the bottom.

In brief (what I can recall to the best of my knowledge):

1. Lift front of sled and support the bellypan area so that the skis are 8-10" off the ground. I use a chain hoist and a milk crate for this;
2. Remove windshield, hood, upper and lower sidepanels;
3. Remove ski bolts, skis and axle that goes through lower strut and lower shock eye;
4. Remove upper shock nut. Use 1/4" wrench to hold sq shaft atop shock or the whole assy will turn;
5. Shocks and springs will drop out;
6. Transfer lower shock eye bushings to new shocks;
7. Install new shock/spring assy, give yourself some preload. I think mine have about 1" of thread below the adjuster;
8. Etc.

I sometimes remove the "cheek plates", which are the black nose pieces to each side of the hood. They are held in place with many torx bolts and two M6 bolts on each side where the accessory bumper mounts on. If you don't have the accessory bumper, these cheek plates are easy to remove. If you have the accessory bumper, those two bolts are tough to get at. When the accessory bumper is present, I try to get the upper shock nut off without removing these cheek plates.

Of course, to each his own, but this has worked for me.

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Here try these instructions:

You really have two options, you can do the job from the top, or from the bottom. It's less work to do it from the bottom.

In brief (what I can recall to the best of my knowledge):

1. Lift front of sled and support the bellypan area so that the skis are 8-10" off the ground. I use a chain hoist and a milk crate for this;
2. Remove windshield, hood, upper and lower sidepanels;
3. Remove ski bolts, skis and axle that goes through lower strut and lower shock eye;
4. Remove upper shock nut. Use 1/4" wrench to hold sq shaft atop shock or the whole assy will turn;
5. Shocks and springs will drop out;
6. Transfer lower shock eye bushings to new shocks;
7. Install new shock/spring assy, give yourself some preload. I think mine have about 1" of thread below the adjuster;
8. Etc.

I sometimes remove the "cheek plates", which are the black nose pieces to each side of the hood. They are held in place with many torx bolts and two M6 bolts on each side where the accessory bumper mounts on. If you don't have the accessory bumper, these cheek plates are easy to remove. If you have the accessory bumper, those two bolts are tough to get at. When the accessory bumper is present, I try to get the upper shock nut off without removing these cheek plates.

Of course, to each his own, but this has worked for me.

cleardot.gif
I was under the impression he wanted to change out the pogo chrome tube that's worn this is why i said it can be only done from the top.
 

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Thanks for the info that you both provided. I do want to replace the chrome looking pogo leg, but I will also be putting in new shocks at the same time.

Hopefully it is fairly simple. At the very least it seems all the things I need to get to are accessible.

I have a feeling that there will be one part I forget to order and I will spend my time waiting for that to finish the job.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the info that you both provided. I do want to replace the chrome looking pogo leg, but I will also be putting in new shocks at the same time.

Hopefully it is fairly simple. At the very least it seems all the things I need to get to are accessible.

I have a feeling that there will be one part I forget to order and I will spend my time waiting for that to finish the job.

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What odds if you do. You'll know what you have when you're done ;)
 

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Thanks to suv1 and LabradorBoy for the tips and insight.

I was able to replace my front shocks and the lower part of the suspension (called ski legs in the parts diagram) after getting all my parts. It was about a $1000 project to do all OEM.

To recap, this is a 2012 Skandic WT 600ACE with about 9,000 miles on it. I should have replaced the spacer that connects the ski to the ski leg, that is where there is metal on metal and over time it wore down and once it was loose I things got worse.

Here is my version of an illustrated step-by-step guide.

First step, take a page of of LabradorBoy's playbook and lift the front end of the sled up using a milk crate.

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Next step, remove the side panels and front panels around the top end of the shock. I did not remove my windshield.

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Now time to remove the suspension cover. LabradorBoy said to use a 1/4" wrench to hold the top of the shock, I used a crescent wrench because I am a rookie mechanic. After removing this bolt the shock is free. I left it in until I removed the whole cover.

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Next remove the lower bolts, there are three of them.

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At this point you can remove the cover and expose the shock.

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At this point there is a bit of a gotcha, there is a rubber bumper that is supposed to be on top of the shock, it gets stuck inside the suspension cover, you have to dig it out. I used a flat head long screwdriver to pry it out. I wasn't concerned about damaging them, I had new ones to put in.

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At this point, take a break and have a beer, you've earned it.

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Life the shock out and remove the spacer on that the three bolts go through. It only fits back on one way so there isn't a top or bottom.

The steering arm connects to the top of the ski leg, I was able to lift it up and turn it back to have access to the top of the ski leg.

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I needed to file down the holes at the bottom of my ski legs so they could slide out.

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Pull the ski leg up through the top of the suspension housing. Note the amount of grease on it, this is a good amount to make sure you have when you put the new one in.

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There are some internal parts to the suspension that I ordered, but did not replace.

The upper cushion, lower cushion, oil seal, and circlip. I didn't replace them because they looked fine and they also looked like a pain in the *ss to get out. Good enough, I left them.

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Liberally grease up your new ski leg, smear it around, and slide it in. This might have been just a bit too much grease, but the first one I put in didn't have enough. I wasn't going to make that mistake again.

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Line up the ski leg so the angled part is pointed back.

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Put the steering arm back on, make sure you're ski leg is pointed the right way or you are going to have a bad time. You can also put the spacer back on top of the shock housing.

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Get your new shock put together. Pretty easy, the load on the spring is not much and the spring stopper on the top went on pretty easy.

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The cushions that go in the bottom of the shock that I ordered were not the correct size, so I had to put the old ones back in. Not sure what happened there. They fit in the shock, but the spacer that goes through that hole was too big. Live and learn.

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Get your hardware together for the long bolt that hold the ski on and the spacers that go through the ski leg and shock. New vs old here. Anyone know why the old parts are silver and the new ones are gold looking?

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Put the rubber stopper on top of the shock. Also put the spacer that goes around the steering arm and under the suspension cover (held by the 3 bolts).

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Put the suspension cover over the shock, line up the holes for your 3 bolts and secure them.

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Time to secure the nut to the top of the shock. Hold the shock in place with your wrench or 1/4" wrench. It tightens down to a point and then just stops.

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Now back to the crux of this whole project, the spacers that go through the bottom of the shock. Put the large spacer in with the two smaller ones on each side.

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At this point there are two cushions that go on either side of the ski that are part of this whole assembly, I replaced those too. Getting them out required a small socket head to pound them out.

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Now is a good time to replace that rubber ski stopper. On the parts diagram I saw there was also a metal support plate. I didn't have one installed originally, but I thought it seemed like a good idea so why not get them. Bad idea, putting the metal plate on top of the rubber put more distance between the holes in the ski and the holes in the ski leg, I could not get them lined up. It was hard enough to get them lined up with just the rubber.

The trick that worked for me to get the long bolt in was to lift up one side of the ski and get the bolt started, pound it in, then lift up on the other side of the ski. Could have used another pair of hands but my buddy was busy watching the Packers game.

At this point one side is all done. Have another beer and hit it again on the other side!

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