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I have a 2006 skidoo skandic 550F and I have been using Castrol 2T snowmobile oil in it. I wanted to get everyone's opinion on if I should stick with it or switch to another injection oil, I operate generally in colder weather. The person I purchased it from ran mineral oil in it. It seemed to do pretty well this year but I didn't test it to much. not sure if its related but I get horrible gas mileage in the skandic, and change plugs probably every 500 miles. Also if I was to change oil would I need to drain the tank or could I just start adding the new oil to it?
 

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I have a 2006 skidoo skandic 550F and I have been using Castrol 2T snowmobile oil in it. I wanted to get everyone's opinion on if I should stick with it or switch to another injection oil, I operate generally in colder weather. The person I purchased it from ran mineral oil in it. It seemed to do pretty well this year but I didn't test it to much. not sure if its related but I get horrible gas mileage in the skandic, and change plugs probably every 500 miles. Also if I was to change oil would I need to drain the tank or could I just start adding the new oil to it?
Don't bother with draining the tank, the sled will never know the difference. Those 550's are not fussy at all.
 

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I always run a full synthetic in all my two strokes, whether they are fan cooled or liquid. Doesn't matter what brand, and you can intermix them when topping off. Arctic Cat APV, Amsoil, BRP, etc. I switched to full synthetic many many years ago on my old triple cylinder sleds, went from replacing plugs every tank to maybe once a season. Can't do much about fuel mileage though, that's just dismal on them.

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I used to be leery about synthetic old mainly because of the name but it's actually a much better oil. It is basically regular oil that has been highly refined and has extra additives in it. The molecules are actually smaller and more uniform which can cause more leaks and cause more oil burning in general but it tolerates colder temperatures better and yes you can mix it with any "regular" oil anytime, anywhere, and in any amount with no repercussions.
 

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Unless it's an ETEC that runs exceptionally hot pistons, I prefer XPS Mineral for the lower end. It still has synthetic additives, but with a mineral base. I never mix though. I empty the oil tank and center cavity. It's more than most would care to do, but they are my sleds so I get to do what I want :)
 

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I used to be leery about synthetic old mainly because of the name but it's actually a much better oil. It is basically regular oil that has been highly refined and has extra additives in it. The molecules are actually smaller and more uniform which can cause more leaks and cause more oil burning in general but it tolerates colder temperatures better.
I'm not sure this is correct ! I understood synthetic was made from an organic compound . No petroleum. Carbolic acid I think . Cheers
 

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mobile1 website states their synthetic oil are mostly crude oil based but advanced refined, it worth noting there are also synthetic motor oils that's not 100%, you need see on container "Full Synthetic"
 
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mobile1 website states their synthetic oil are mostly crude oil based but advanced refined, it worth noting there are also synthetic motor oils that's not 100%, you need see on container "Full Synthetic"
The problem with semi-synthetic is that there are no regulations on the percentage and it could be only 5% and still retain the label so it's better to mix it yourself if that's what you want. I run full synthetic in everything I own now but don't believe in the extended oil change intervals that some claim since it all gets dirty and diluted.
 

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I'm not sure this is correct ! I understood synthetic was made from an organic compound . No petroleum. Carbolic acid I think . Cheers
There was a lawsuit about it years back. Mobile one sued some other guys about claiming synthetic when it really wasn't. Mobile1 lost, so they cheapened out too.

If you look into to oil grades in depth, you'll see what I'm saying, but synthetic is just more refined Dino juice. It is better, but I personally don't like government telling companies they can lie to us.
 

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It's funny how the extended oil change intervals of "synthetic" oil went from 100k miles to much less over the years. I never was a fan of the extended changes from day one because it all gets dirty and contaminated with gas and water, especially if you make a lot of short runs in cold weather. I don't use dino oil anymore in anything and never risked an extended change. I don't want to start an interval change mile debate but my vehicles get changed in 5,000 miles. Also I think that 3k mile change was started by the little oil change shops to make more money.
 

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i'm no expert, but my two-cents. i have ran Amsoil Interceptor in my 2009 SUV 550F since the day i bought it. over 14,000 km's completely original engine. seemed to burn just over a case of quarts per year. although just a spare sled last couple years and hardly used. its' a Yellowknife sled with lots of cold starts. the last couple years that she was my daily driver, i put a tablespoon in the tank as well when filling up. i'm confident there is a long list of reasons why you shouldn't do this, but an ole timer suggested it and it became a habit. changed plugs only annually after the first fall start after burning off the oil in the cylinders from winterizing. electric start never cut it after -30C, its a slow and hard pull on the cord but she always started. have a similar experience with a 2001 Polaris 340 but with much less mileage. however, on the new 900 ACE i follow the rules using the doo oil, the "extreme" stuff for cold weather. incidentally, in regards to the 550F and engine life, i'm not a WOT rider...60kph was usually top speed, likely has as much to with long life as good synthetic oil, i think jetting is an issue in cold weather as well, but have not had that explained well to me, or perhaps dumb luck. i usually got 13 miles-per-uk-gal driving like an ole lady. Good Luck LL.
 

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i'm no expert, but my two-cents. i have ran Amsoil Interceptor in my 2009 SUV 550F since the day i bought it. over 14,000 km's completely original engine. seemed to burn just over a case of quarts per year. although just a spare sled last couple years and hardly used. its' a Yellowknife sled with lots of cold starts. the last couple years that she was my daily driver, i put a tablespoon in the tank as well when filling up. i'm confident there is a long list of reasons why you shouldn't do this, but an ole timer suggested it and it became a habit. changed plugs only annually after the first fall start after burning off the oil in the cylinders from winterizing. electric start never cut it after -30C, its a slow and hard pull on the cord but she always started. have a similar experience with a 2001 Polaris 340 but with much less mileage. however, on the new 900 ACE i follow the rules using the doo oil, the "extreme" stuff for cold weather. incidentally, in regards to the 550F and engine life, i'm not a WOT rider...60kph was usually top speed, likely has as much to with long life as good synthetic oil, i think jetting is an issue in cold weather as well, but have not had that explained well to me, or perhaps dumb luck. i usually got 13 miles-per-uk-gal driving like an ole lady. Good Luck LL.
As far as I know there is no list of reasons why one shouldn't do this. Folks have been employing this practice sine the 60s when the oil injection system came out and the inexplicable failures that followed. It is still a practice used 50 years later even with the most sophisticated EFI sleds that still have these inexplicable failures... Arctic Cat engineers have based their 600/800 C-TEC2 engines on this practice by injecting oil in the fuel rail. By the way, I measure by the oz lol
 

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As far as I know there is no list of reasons why one shouldn't do this. Folks have been employing this practice sine the 60s when the oil injection system came out and the inexplicable failures that followed. It is still a practice used 50 years later even with the most sophisticated EFI sleds that still have these inexplicable failures... Arctic Cat engineers have based their 600/800 C-TEC2 engines on this practice by injecting oil in the fuel rail. By the way, I measure by the oz lol
Because it can gum up the rings, upset the air/fuel ratio, cause deposits in the cylinder, smokes up the trail, leaves deposits in the muffler, and contributes to fouling the plugs. If the injection system fails that little bit of oil you added to the gas probably won't keep a jug from burning down, don't ask me how I know.

cyl-2.jpg
 

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Because it can gum up the rings, upset the air/fuel ratio, cause deposits in the cylinder, smokes up the trail, leaves deposits in the muffler, and contributes to fouling the plugs. If the injection system fails that little bit of oil you added to the gas probably won't keep a jug from burning down, don't ask me how I know.

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cyl-2.jpg
I agree, a teaspoon in an 8 gallon fill-up is roughly 6,000:1 . A 100:1 premix upsets the fuel jetting or injection by 1%. There is a greater variance in Air/Fuel ratio with just air density even with the most sophisticated engines, or stacked tolerances in injectors, or stacked tolerances in anything.

100:1 1%

150:1 0.75%

200:1 0.5%

For the deposits and smoke, this is a riddle. Take a close look at the thousands of sleds sold every year that are being fed more oil than what you were using in the 60s. Yet they pass phase 3 of the EPA emissions, need a plug change maybe once every 5,000 miles while some last 10,000 miles, run leaner than race sleds could last on trails, survive 15,000+ miles and a 4 years warranty. By the way, that jug could use more clearance ;)
 

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used nothing but amsoil in my 570 cat since day one. 16,000 miles on her now. I premix 50:1 when its below minus 25, my dad always did it so why the hell not. Seems to have worked. Dont use mineral based unless i have to.
 

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I agree, a teaspoon in an 8 gallon fill-up is roughly 6,000:1 . A 100:1 premix upsets the fuel jetting or injection by 1%. There is a greater variance in Air/Fuel ratio with just air density even with the most sophisticated engines, or stacked tolerances in injectors, or stacked tolerances in anything.

100:1 1%

150:1 0.75%

200:1 0.5%

For the deposits and smoke, this is a riddle. Take a close look at the thousands of sleds sold every year that are being fed more oil than what you were using in the 60s. Yet they pass phase 3 of the EPA emissions, need a plug change maybe once every 5,000 miles while some last 10,000 miles, run leaner than race sleds could last on trails, survive 15,000+ miles and a 4 years warranty. By the way, that jug could use more clearance ;)
Actually that is all aluminum so I honed it out, bought a used 550 piston on Ebay for 5 or $10, stuck it in with used pin, rings and all, and it ran fine plus I didn't buy any gaskets and it was back up a couple days later.
 

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Actually that is all aluminum so I honed it out, bought a used 550 piston on Ebay for 5 or $10, stuck it in with used pin, rings and all, and it ran fine plus I didn't buy any gaskets and it was back up a couple days later.
Often times it is about getting the sled back together without missing the season. It really is amazing how much can be done with a small budget.
 
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