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Ka-RAY-Zeeee
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I've always done this with a decent plug that has become fouled:

Spray it down with brake clean, let the stuff drain out of the electrode area
Hit it with a propane torch to burn off anything that's left.
Check it in the engine to make sure it runs
Use it as a second backup plug in the sled.

Years ago we did this all the time as the 20:1 premix sleds fouled plugs daily. We had no extra $$ for plugs so you had to make them last. This method worked.

I do keep a brand new set of spares in the sled these days.
 

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ITs WINTER!
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If your lucky it can be cleaned up and reused, but you dont want to keep doing that forever! Plugs are fairly cheap, buy a pack every once in a while.
 

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ITs WINTER!
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Some of us dont shop for everything at the dealer


Even if i payed $10 a plug, $20 a year isnt bad. Especially for something you just dropped $10g+ on!
 

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I soak them in gas then scrape with a pin and burn everything off with a lighter. Dont do it to the same plug over and over because it probably eventually wont work anymore but if you only do it once or twice its fine. Ive had to do it on my dirtbike plenty of times when I dont have new plugs.
 

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YES you can clean and reuse your fouled plugs. I am an aircraft mechanic and we clean, gap and test plugs every fifty hours on aircraft. If you get a fouled plug, clean off the deposits with carb cleaner. For tough deposits use a brass wire brush (the brass will not damage the electrode. Check for wear on the electrode, if it is still relatively round you can reuse it. If it is oval shaped then just toss it and get a new one. We use plugs in aircraft for up to 500 hours. Regap the plug as needed and then test before reinstalling. Most importantly DO NOT drop the plug, if you do, throw it away! When plugs are dropped they can become cracked and short out to ground. Never reuse a dropped plug even if it tests fine. They may test alright but will break down under pressure and heat causing misfire.
 
G

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YES you can clean and reuse your fouled plugs. I am an aircraft mechanic and we clean, gap and test plugs every fifty hours on aircraft. If you get a fouled plug, clean off the deposits with carb cleaner. For tough deposits use a brass wire brush (the brass will not damage the electrode. Check for wear on the electrode, if it is still relatively round you can reuse it. If it is oval shaped then just toss it and get a new one. We use plugs in aircraft for up to 500 hours. Regap the plug as needed and then test before reinstalling. Most importantly DO NOT drop the plug, if you do, throw it away! When plugs are dropped they can become cracked and short out to ground. Never reuse a dropped plug even if it tests fine. They may test alright but will break down under pressure and heat causing misfire.
Great info
Thanks
 

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YES you can clean and reuse your fouled plugs. I am an aircraft mechanic and we clean, gap and test plugs every fifty hours on aircraft. If you get a fouled plug, clean off the deposits with carb cleaner. For tough deposits use a brass wire brush (the brass will not damage the electrode. Check for wear on the electrode, if it is still relatively round you can reuse it. If it is oval shaped then just toss it and get a new one. We use plugs in aircraft for up to 500 hours. Regap the plug as needed and then test before reinstalling. Most importantly DO NOT drop the plug, if you do, throw it away! When plugs are dropped they can become cracked and short out to ground. Never reuse a dropped plug even if it tests fine. They may test alright but will break down under pressure and heat causing misfire.
Some of the NGK's should not be regapped. That is why they have different part number BR9 plugs for Carb and SDI sleds.
 

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YES you can clean and reuse your fouled plugs. I am an aircraft mechanic and we clean, gap and test plugs every fifty hours on aircraft. If you get a fouled plug, clean off the deposits with carb cleaner. For tough deposits use a brass wire brush (the brass will not damage the electrode. Check for wear on the electrode, if it is still relatively round you can reuse it. If it is oval shaped then just toss it and get a new one. We use plugs in aircraft for up to 500 hours. Regap the plug as needed and then test before reinstalling. Most importantly DO NOT drop the plug, if you do, throw it away! When plugs are dropped they can become cracked and short out to ground. Never reuse a dropped plug even if it tests fine. They may test alright but will break down under pressure and heat causing misfire.
Some of the NGK's should not be regapped. That is why they have different part number BR9 plugs for Carb and SDI sleds.
[/quote]

They should be gapped to spec for the respective part # plug. Check with NGK to be sure, but, if I remember right, my dealer said that the plugs for the carbed version should be gapped to .020 for optimum performance.
 

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ITs WINTER!
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7,500 Posts
YES you can clean and reuse your fouled plugs. I am an aircraft mechanic and we clean, gap and test plugs every fifty hours on aircraft. If you get a fouled plug, clean off the deposits with carb cleaner. For tough deposits use a brass wire brush (the brass will not damage the electrode. Check for wear on the electrode, if it is still relatively round you can reuse it. If it is oval shaped then just toss it and get a new one. We use plugs in aircraft for up to 500 hours. Regap the plug as needed and then test before reinstalling. Most importantly DO NOT drop the plug, if you do, throw it away! When plugs are dropped they can become cracked and short out to ground. Never reuse a dropped plug even if it tests fine. They may test alright but will break down under pressure and heat causing misfire.
^^^

Those aircraft plugs arent supposed to be cheap either, i heard they were like $80 a pop. I would be cleaning and reusing them for that price too!


As for gapping, you should NOT try to gap the ECS plugs. Because of the electrode style and being welded at the goofy 45* angle they apparently become prone to breaking off if you change the gap. That is why NGK sells them pregapped to 2 specs. In the end its not a big difference which one you use, both gaps will work.
 

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ok, well i just changed my plugs for the first time on a 03 600ho. i havent changed it on my 05 800ho. i couldnt find the gap for the 600ho, so i used the 800's which is .031. i checked the new and old plugs for which both sleds call for, and way to small of a gap. so i made it right. now, people say not to change the gap, but why would the manufacture recommend a certain plug to be gapped at a certain measurment, and then not do it? someone elaberate.
 

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depends on how bad its fouled of course...

a fouled plug is a symptom not a problem...

need to find the root cause, you should be able to run a sled 1000-2000+ miles on a single set of plugs...

I change them at the 1000 mi mark just for the hell of it...
 

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Hurry, pull my string again!
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Alot of times a fouled plug is too cruddy to fire over a cold motor (no bottom end heat to help vaporize fuel, cold plug is mor emoist, etc). I have started up a motor on a good/new plug, then shut down and toss in the crap plug, only to have it fire (after it would not cold) and then run them. most of the time they'll clean right off. fouling is typically just a crappy coating of fuel/oil residue. burn it off and a black plug can go right to nice chocolate.

el cheapo method, but why waste money???
 

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I just put fouled plugs in a GOOD running engine.........and they run.........run them for a little while and pull them out.......clean as new........

Used to do this on the trail all the time........swap plugs from sled to sled........called the ski-doo's PLUG CLEANERS, and the polaris's PLUG FOULERS

Another trick that sometimes works to clean a fouled plug, is to pull the spark plug cap off the plug, and let it just barely dangle over the top of the plug...........this ADDS resistance to the IGN system, and makes the coil become FULLY SATURATED before it fires, and thus increases the VOLTAGE of the spark.....

Often times you can just do this, and ride it for a litle bit, and then snap your plug cap back on.........

I am not 100% sure this works with the doo ignition system, sense it could screw up the MPEM . But it worked like a charm on the older doo's and my dirt bikes..
 
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