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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought the Summit X 670 last winter and only got a couple of chances to ride it. The first time it had water in the fuel from being left outside, but a little gas line antifreeze ran through it and it ran perfectly; had full power, started easily, and would idle on it's own. Now this year I've had nothing but trouble. I got to run it once and it died out on the ride. I got towed and let it sit then after a couple hours it started first pull and ran fine but felt like it was lacking power. Ever since then it's been hard to start, and if it does start then it bogs out after a minute or two if I'm not consistently giving it throttle or pumping the primer. I cleaned the carbs, cleaned the RAVE valves, and replaced my DPM (the old one had fittings broken off, but turns out it wasn't plugged in. New ones not plugged in either, don't know where to plug it in to), ran Seafoam, HEET and rec gas in it. Usually I can get it started once, but after it bogs itself out, there's no use in trying. At this point, any ideas would be greatly appreciated. Should also add, I live and ride in Michigan so I'm not dealing with altitude as an issue, and sleds been in Michigan it's whole life.
 

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If the carbs are clean, then the next things are fuel pump, and lines, particularly the pick up line inside the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It seems to be getting fuel, primer works and there's visible fuel in the lines. I got it to start to today (had to prime it and hold throttle open part way to get it to start) and had a good amount of oil come out of the exhaust. Could it be that my oil pump is turned up too much? If so, how would I go about adjusting it?
 

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All the "Heat" and "Seafoam" in the world won't ever get rid of all the moisture in your gas tank. Pull the tank off, turn it upside down and drain it completely. Use a detergent like "Super Kleen" and hot water and slosh it around in the tank, dump the tank again, add hot water again and repeat the process. When the tank appears to be clean let it sit where it's warm so it can dry completely before you put it back on. Don't rush it. Replace the grommet where the fuel line goes in and replace the filter on the end of the line. Remove the carb bowls and clean the carbs again. I would also remove, disassemble and clean the fuel pump and install a new gasket and diaphram kit. Blow out the fuel lines and you should be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't feel like moisture is the problem. When it starts, it sounds great. I did work on it a little today and found the oil pump level was extremely high. I adjusted it so the marks line up and started it (started second pull). I had it running for roughly 3 minutes but had to use the throttle and primer to keep it running. Once again I had a puddle of oil come out of the exhaust (not nearly as big as before) so I decided to check the spark plugs. They both had a small amount of fuel on them, but were otherwise in perfect condition. Once I removed the plugs though, I had smoke coming out of their holes.
 

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Maybe some of what you are seeing is a result of contaminated fuel which won't completely burn.

Lynn
 

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Here are a few things to consider.

1. If there is a excess of oil under the crankshaft it can take quite a while to get it to come out. You would need to get it out on the trail, putting it under a load and getting the rpm's up.

2. The amount of oil supplied from the pump at an idle is minimal, so an adjustment to reduce oil flow really is not the solution, make sure the pump lever is returning to rest position.

3.When you say the DPM was and is disconnected I think (rich fueling). The DPM is designed to pull fuel, so the base jetting will run rich if the system is not working. You need to be sure the base jetting is corrected if this is the condition. Confirm the jetting is correct for your elevation and model.

4. When the engine dies and the plugs are pulled to check fuel and spark, be aware a oil fouled plug can trick you into thinking it's covered with gas but is actually oil.

5. Having the tank clean and contaminant free is something you need to be sure of. Contaminates can possibly sit in areas and then be pulled into the pickup when your riding, As mentioned consider taking it off.

6. The pick up screen on the fuel line in the tank does wear. A section of the screen resting on the bottom, over time will rub thru and possibly allow particles to pass. These can restrict the jetting.

7. A compression test should be performed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well. I just got around to doing a compression test and the sled read 111 and 100. What should the compression be on these sleds?
 
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