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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I was riding on the pole line here in northern Ontario when I got stuck and decided to try and throttle out of it but ended up digging a good trench. I eventually got out and got off the machine to go see what I was stuck on. As I walked down my tracks I noticed small drips of green. I immediately turned around to my machine and shut it off while looking at the temp gauge and only seeing it at halfway still. When I shut it off the coolant started pouring out from the front of the machine. I tipped it over and saw the carnage. I got pulled home and now have started looking at prices. One dealership wants 371 for parts and 3-4 hours labor @ 95$/hr. Another shop wants 371 parts and 8-11 hours labor @ 85$/hr and they said it was quite a serious job. My question is this really a big job or something I could tackle myself with a little mechanical knowledge and your average set of wrenches?

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If u have a air rivet gun and a coolant pressure pump. I'd do it myself. It's not a tuff job. Just takes a bit of time

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't have either of those. I do have a regular rivet gun though not sure if it will work. How does the coolant pump work I've never hear of one

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a guy could do it with a hand rivet gun and hang the front of the sled up to fill and get the air out of the heat exchanger. But those two tools will make the job a lot easer. PS both of the tools can be purchased at princess auto for around 100$. If u already have a air compressor. Most jobs are easy with the proper tools. Without them. Not so much. Good luck

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alright awesome. Also I watched a video on it and it looks like they used a special tool to get the brake rotor off. Is this necessary ?

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Some guys use it. I just use a small pry bar. Work your way around the rotor slowly pry it off. Use a cloth or something so the pry bar doesn't scratch your tunnel. Just don't put to much pressure and bent the rotor. Put it back on with the bolts

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You gotta pull the skid and the track to fix that. It's a b_i_t_c_h, especially if you have never done it before and don't have the correct tools. At a minimum, I'd recommend buying the brake rotor puller tool and the shop manual for your sled. Probably less than $100 for both. The rest you can jerry-rig.
 

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You can make your own brake rotor puller easy with a peice of angle iron an a few bolts an nuts an a welder. Costed me $0.00 cause I had the stuff in my shop already. I'd post a picture of it if I can figure out how to post pics off my phone.
 

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Just fork the money out for the few tools it's not an impossible job just takes a bit of time and then at the end of the day you will probably have saved a bit of $$ over the shop, learned a whole bunch AND you got some new tools. Just my .02
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Alright I'm thinking about probly doing it myself. This time of year the shops are booked crazy anyways. What should something like this take someone for the first time ?

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So I was riding on the pole line here in northern Ontario when I got stuck and decided to try and throttle out of it but ended up digging a good trench. I eventually got out and got off the machine to go see what I was stuck on. As I walked down my tracks I noticed small drips of green. I immediately turned around to my machine and shut it off while looking at the temp gauge and only seeing it at halfway still. When I shut it off the coolant started pouring out from the front of the machine. I tipped it over and saw the carnage. I got pulled home and now have started looking at prices. One dealership wants 371 for parts and 3-4 hours labor @ 95$/hr. Another shop wants 371 parts and 8-11 hours labor @ 85$/hr and they said it was quite a serious job. My question is this really a big job or something I could tackle myself with a little mechanical knowledge and your average set of wrenches?

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ImageUploadedByTapatalk1453130443.600199.jpg

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I can not see in the pics what caused the damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So I ordered a puller today. Called my local dealer and they have never heard of the brake rotor puller apparently and said I didn't need it so I just went ahead and ordered one from the link provided. Cost me 65$ shipped. Yay Canada...

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I think you have to pull off the front plastics, both airboxes, carbs and secondary/jack shaft to be able get at it from the other side, but don't need to pull the engine. The owners manual should give you step by step instructions for pulling it, as well as the process for burping the cooler when refilled. I researched the effort required when the same thing happened to me a couple years ago. Decided to pay the dealer to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Well I did get the rad off as it turns out I did have to take off the skid plate underneath and found the rest of the rivets. I notice more Damage to the exchangers under the tunnel. I cannot see any wholes or cracks and not s drop of coolant. Are there suitable to run in this shape ?

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