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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Four years ago, I decided to consider a restoration project of one of the sleds that I had purchased new throughout my sledding career. I’ve owned 40 new sleds since the late 80’s, and as I looked back to determine which machine I wanted to acquire, the answer was easy – the 1993 MXZ.

I actually owned a ’93 MXZ that I purchased new that year – it was the first sled I ever spring ordered. Unfortunately – as I did many times – I sold it at the end of that season and always regretted it. It was the very first MXZ model and also the first year of the F2000 chassis platform. Limited production, first-year sled.

So, in the fall of 2017, I started the search for a ’93 MXZ. While I was prepared to face a restoration project, the hope/fantasy was that I’d find a fantastic, one-owner sled that I could simply do a weekend clean-up, wax the hood and be good to go – no resto needed. We all know how tough that is to find!

I quickly realized that this search was going to be tougher than expected. While not necessarily really old, these sleds are incredibly tough to find! After a year of placing ads on various venues (including DOOTalk), going to swap meets, etc., I finally found one.

Unfortunately, it was far from perfect. It had hit a stump on the left side, which resulted in a bent trailing arm and a belly pan with multiple cracks. However, having spent a year looking, I decided I had to buy it and deal with the damage.

Now I needed a parts sled. The search continued, and about a week later I stumbled onto another one. When I went to pick it up from the owner, it was super dirty/dusty, but physically appeared to be in decent shape. Seemed good enough for a parts sled, so I quickly loaded it up and brought it home.

Once I had it in the shop, I realized that beneath the dust and dirt it was actually very nice and actually in better physical condition than the first one. It seemed like it would be a shame to cannibalize this thing for parts so I decided to restore this one as well.

Now – with two sleds worthy of restoration – I needed a third sled for parts, so I continued my search. After another year, I came across a third sled. Again, very dusty/dirty when I picked it up, but when I got it into the shop, I realized it was actually in better condition than the first two. After a close inspection, I just couldn’t see making it a parts sled, so the decision was made to restore all three.

All three sleds were disassembled down to the engine and bare chassis as the starting point for restoration. The plan was to not to over-restore them, but rather make them exceptionally clean along with being mechanically and electrically sound. Originality would be maintained to the highest extent possible based on availability of NOS parts.

Finally – after several years of significant expense, time, and effort – this triple-resto project is complete. Note from the group photo that there are some slight variations between the three. The sled in the center has the rare, optional NOS yellow ski bottoms. The sled on the right features current-generation Ski-Doo Pilot X skis. With original plastic ski bottoms essentially extinct, the decision was made to modify the original ski stopper to accommodate the Pilot X’s.

In the end, I took three original sleds that had been essentially “left for dead” by their previous owners, and turned them all into fine examples of the 1993 MXZ. Special thanks to the following – couldn’t have completed this huge project without them:

  • Ray’s Sport and Cycle, Grand Rapids, Minnesota
  • Fullerton’s PAC, Bracebridge, Ontario
  • Gull Lake Sandblasting & Powdercoating, Brainerd, Minnesota

Feel free to contact me with questions or comments . . .
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Mr Top Whore
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Very nice job on the resto, they all look great 👍👍
Are these sleds all going to be ridden now or they going to be trailer queens?
Let’s see some under hood pics!
 

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doughnut boy
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Four years ago, I decided to consider a restoration project of one of the sleds that I had purchased new throughout my sledding career. I’ve owned 40 new sleds since the late 80’s, and as I looked back to determine which machine I wanted to acquire, the answer was easy – the 1993 MXZ.

I actually owned a ’93 MXZ that I purchased new that year – it was the first sled I ever spring ordered. Unfortunately – as I did many times – I sold it at the end of that season and always regretted it. It was the very first MXZ model and also the first year of the F2000 chassis platform. Limited production, first-year sled.

So, in the fall of 2017, I started the search for a ’93 MXZ. While I was prepared to face a restoration project, the hope/fantasy was that I’d find a fantastic, one-owner sled that I could simply do a weekend clean-up, wax the hood and be good to go – no resto needed. We all know how tough that is to find!

I quickly realized that this search was going to be tougher than expected. While not necessarily really old, these sleds are incredibly tough to find! After a year of placing ads on various venues (including DOOTalk), going to swap meets, etc., I finally found one.

Unfortunately, it was far from perfect. It had hit a stump on the left side, which resulted in a bent trailing arm and a belly pan with multiple cracks. However, having spent a year looking, I decided I had to buy it and deal with the damage.

Now I needed a parts sled. The search continued, and about a week later I stumbled onto another one. When I went to pick it up from the owner, it was super dirty/dusty, but physically appeared to be in decent shape. Seemed good enough for a parts sled, so I quickly loaded it up and brought it home.

Once I had it in the shop, I realized that beneath the dust and dirt it was actually very nice and actually in better physical condition than the first one. It seemed like it would be a shame to cannibalize this thing for parts so I decided to restore this one as well.

Now – with two sleds worthy of restoration – I needed a third sled for parts, so I continued my search. After another year, I came across a third sled. Again, very dusty/dirty when I picked it up, but when I got it into the shop, I realized it was actually in better condition than the first two. After a close inspection, I just couldn’t see making it a parts sled, so the decision was made to restore all three.

All three sleds were disassembled down to the engine and bare chassis as the starting point for restoration. The plan was to not to over-restore them, but rather make them exceptionally clean along with being mechanically and electrically sound. Originality would be maintained to the highest extent possible based on availability of NOS parts.

Finally – after several years of significant expense, time, and effort – this triple-resto project is complete. Note from the group photo that there are some slight variations between the three. The sled in the center has the rare, optional NOS yellow ski bottoms. The sled on the right features current-generation Ski-Doo Pilot X skis. With original plastic ski bottoms essentially extinct, the decision was made to modify the original ski stopper to accommodate the Pilot X’s.

In the end, I took three original sleds that had been essentially “left for dead” by their previous owners, and turned them all into fine examples of the 1993 MXZ. Special thanks to the following – couldn’t have completed this huge project without them:

  • Ray’s Sport and Cycle, Grand Rapids, Minnesota
  • Fullerton’s PAC, Bracebridge, Ontario
  • Gull Lake Sandblasting & Powdercoating, Brainerd, Minnesota

Feel free to contact me with questions or comments . . . View attachment 1976394
Nice work… you still married after resto of 3 sled.. Lol


Sent from the bakery using Tapatalk
 

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Looks like three very nice restorations...!

Back in 1993 it felt like those were common, nowadays it's like trying to find a 1993 MachZ...

Feel free to post pictures also of the resto work itself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the comments guys. Here are some additional triple-resto project notes and pics . . . .

RESTORATIION HIGHLIGHTS COMMON TO ALL THREE SLEDS:

  • NOS tracks installed
  • Complete driveline service with new bearings and seals in all locations
  • Skid frames completely disassembled, serviced, and restored to new condition with NOS hardware as required
  • Drive and driven clutches disassembled, serviced, and restored with NOS components as required
  • Fuel tanks cleaned and new fittings and grommets installed
  • All new fuel lines installed
  • Fuel pumps disassembled, serviced, and restored with new components
  • Carbs disassembled, serviced, and restored to new condition with NOS components as required
  • All front and rear steel suspension components media blasted and powder coated as required
  • All original components that could be restored were restored; any components that could not be restored were replaced with NOS parts to the greatest extent possible

MISC. RESTORATION HIGHLIGHTS

  • Two of the sleds received NOS shocks at all locations in the skid frame
  • Two of the sleds had the slide rails restored in a natural, brushed finish for a different look
  • Two of the sleds were restored utilizing the reinforced steering pivot hardware assembly that was stock on the ’93 Mach Z
  • Two of the sleds that had broken original (single element) thumbwarmers were restored with an upgraded NOS dual-element throttle lever/heater assembly. This also required a new thumbwarmer switch and electrical system modifications
  • One of the sleds has mechanical reverse
  • Two of the sleds have the OEM rear tow hitch installed
  • Two of the sleds have reproduction seat covers
  • Two of the sleds were restored with NOS tuned pipe assemblies
The only aftermarket parts used in the restoration of these there sleds were several small idlers in the skid frames and the replica seat covers on two of the sleds.

"Ditchbangr zx" asked what I plan to do with these sleds. Good question. Now that they're all complete, I'll be giving it more thought. They might all be riders, they might all be for sale . . . I'll be making those decisions over the next few weeks . . .

Photos are representative of the restoration condition of all three sleds . . .
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Those are beautiful! Thanks for sharing and wow! Awesome work you did there!
 

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Very nice...! Please don't sell them, you will for sure regret it...!

Two questions popped up,

1. Who made the reproduction seat covers...?

2. The yellow bumper trim looks too good to be true, really on all three sleds. Are these OEM, NOS or aftermarket...?
 

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Very nice...! Please don't sell them, you will for sure regret it...!

Two questions popped up,

1. Who made the reproduction seat covers...?

2. The yellow bumper trim looks too good to be true, really on all three sleds. Are these OEM, NOS or aftermarket...?
seen many mask off the bumper trim and shoot it yellow paint, not an uncommon practice
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
To address a few questions:

1) The reproduction seat covers used on two of the sleds were fabricated by AtwoodParts in Florence, VT (802-236-7654). They hadn't done a '93 MXZ cover previously, so I actually sent one of my original covers to them so they could create a pattern for it. They've got the tooling to match the original cover, including the tooling to heat-set the printing on the storage compartment flap at the back of the seat. Also the "Ski-Doo" lettering is done with a heat set process vs. the original silk screen for improved durability. I paid $250 each for the repro covers.

2) The yellow trim on the front bumpers of all three sleds is original.

I agree with everyone - would likely be very tough to actually consider selling any of these machines. It's a fairly unique collection that involved a lot of investment in time, effort, and cash. I now consider myself an expert on the F2000 chassis - right down to the smallest detail. If anyone is involved in restoring an F2000 chassis sled and has questions, let me know. I'd be glad to assist.
 

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Clearly you did an excellent restoration. Any before pictures?
Shed some light on the hood (repairs, painting) and the decals
 

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I am not an F chassis fan, but this is one of the best looking F chassis sleds there is. Great job!!!!
 

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The reproduction seat covers used on two of the sleds were fabricated by AtwoodParts in Florence, VT (802-236-7654).
Thank you, good to know about one more option.

If anyone is involved in restoring an F2000 chassis sled and has questions, let me know.
If you do have a source for the bumper trim - no matter yellow, red or anything else - please let me know.
 

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Really great looking sleds. Congrats on the restore and thanks for sharing. I have often thought of my ZX chassis sled from 2001 as one I wish I still had.
 

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Quick question on the seat covers. Did you have any problem installing the new covers? The reason I ask is I had one made after sending the maker an old cover to use as a pattern. My problem after getting the new cover and trying to get it to fit was apparently the old cover used for a pattern had shrunk slightly from age. The new cover was slightly small.
I did get the cover to fit with some struggling but you can see a couple flaws in the fit I haven't been able to correct. Some people might be thrilled but me, not so much. I paid more than you did too.
BTW, Nice job on the restorations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the continued replies everyone. To address a few comments/questions:

1) For the reproduction seat covers, I sent the vendor the original as a pattern for the new one. No doubt that these covers do shrink over time, so making a pattern from a nearly 30 year old cover is a bit tricky. I basically left it up to the shop to consider that as they worked on the new one. The final result was really good overall - it definitely was not too small and actually if anything a bit too big in the area around the seat "bun". I had the two covers installed by a local upholstery shop and the guy did great job of attaching the repro cover and getting it to fit the way it should. The seat covers were one of the most significant individual expenses on these restorations at $250/EA for the covers and $70/EA for installation, Just part of the deal . . .

2) Unfortunately I don't have a source for the front bumper molding. I did search for it, but never could find it (I only searched for the yellow). Thankfully the original trim was decent on all three sleds. I'm a bit surprised that the trim is extinct as it seems like it would have been a very common replacement part manufactured in high numbers back in the day..

That's what makes these resto projects tough - some of the seemingly simple, mundane parts can be the toughest to find. There were many of those type of parts n these three sleds. I was very fortunate that I was able to find everything I needed to complete all three. There were several times during the builds that i wasn't sure I'd be able to find what I needed for all three sleds. Being able to find a NOS belly pan from Fullerton's PAC for the one sled was really lucky - probably the last one left anywhere and without it that machine couldn't have been built.

Many NOS parts for these early 90's F2000 sleds are becoming very scarce . . . .
 
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