Ski-Doo Snowmobiles Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey, so I just rebuilt a 1987 tundra LT 248cc and am almost ready to go. I've never owned a snowmobile before so this was a really fun project for me. I went through the free operator's manual on the net and kinda hope it's possible to find a real repair and maintenance manual for free or at least pay for a physical copy. If anybody knows about where I can find these I'd appreciate being pointed (clicked) in the right direction. (because I intend on putting a 377 or whatever biggest fits in the future)

Anyway, so I'm at that point where I want to properly tension the track. The manual says that i have to loosen the rear wheel nuts and then tighten the tensioner bolts until i get 1/2 of space between the slider and the track right (right behind the middle wheel). I'm a ''by the book'' kinda guy but actually forgot to loosen the rear wheel bolts before tightening the track... the result is that I have a bigger than 1/2 gap and I'm near maximum tension.. given my understanding that a track is supposed to be tightened more as it wears with time this has me worried i did something wrong.

Why do the Tundra 1 and Tundra1 LT need to have the rear wheel loosened anyway? do you think starting over will change the outcome? it's still in the garage so it's no trouble. just thought I'd ask.

I'll put up a teaser picture of the sled where it stood for 10 years without a track. I'll post the whole rebuild and surprise aesthetic when i get my rear rack and light on (was waiting for paint to cure)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,777 Posts
The idler bolts are supposed to lock it in position. Depending on the sled, this has a varying amount of locking effect, I have seen some that will move fairly easily without loosening the idlers, other not. Hopefully you didn't strip something. You can look at the slots where the axle slides and see where it is to know how much adjustment is really left.

You can post a few pics of the adjustment area so we can see what is actually going on.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top