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#1 Skidoo backcountry

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 01:19 PM

So i am just getting into boondocking and i'e gone up to the UP a couple of times to boondock. i find that i am not maneuvering very well...... what do i need to do to get better...? Any tips would be appreciated..



#2 RS_Rider

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 01:50 PM

I, by no means, am an expert. That being said, the best way to get better is by riding. Figure out how the sled reacts to what you're doing. And one big thing is try to carry your momentum into things. Make the most of each trip and focus on working on small things on your sled.

 

Good luck!  :righton


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#3 ifishiam

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Posted 06 February 2015 - 03:52 PM

It is hard to say what you need to do based on your comments...but. here are couple thoughts that helped me. 

 

First things first...learn to carve and counter steer the sled. Find some open places to practice this and use trees and such as obstacles to steer around. When riding in deep snow, you will struggle to turn with any speed by relying on the skis, its much more about body english and leaning the entire machine. It's not always easy to find, but try to find untracked soft snow to practice in, carving is much harder when you are learning if the snow is packed down and\or rutted up. It doesn't need to be waste deep powder, but a good 8-12" of soft snow really helps.

 

Secondly, you need to look farther ahead and anticipate your movements. Because you have to transfer your weight and the weight of the sled to turn, you need more time, so practice looking beyond the next tree or turn to anticipate where you want to go next and this will help you get the weight transfer started sooner and allow you to carry more speed. 

 

Third, look where you want to go and not at what you want to avoid. Meaning, if you are trying to steer around a tree, don't look at the tree, look at the line you are trying to take. Your body will follow your eyes so the more you focus on where you want to go, the easier it will be to get there. 

 

Fourth, Keep moving....this will take time to master, but the physics of carving requires you to be going forward with enough momentum to allow you to lean the sled over to turn and not just tip over. Practice carrying more speed and carving harder to get a feel for how more throttle will actually you to turn more aggressively as you gain confidence. There is of course a balance point, but your ability to lean over more and carve harder is proportional to your speed and throttle control. 

 

Fifth, spend less time on DooTalk and more time on your sled.  :rolleyes_old:

 

Have Fun! 



#4 Minnesota FreeRide

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 10:17 AM

The very last line is hard to do this year, wow. . . . .Only one trip to be able to ride at all, second on end of the week but nothing to ride on at home. . . . .(Next year will be better!!!)


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#5 Skidoo backcountry

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 12:18 PM

Thank you guys i will try all of it, maybe next year if we get more snow... :blush_old:  



#6 longtrack_jack

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 03:15 PM

Get comfortable with your sled. Easier said than done. Ride as much as possible. Get to the point where you can tip the sled on one ski when going down a road or trail and hold it there for as long as you want. Each time you ride you will get better. I am hitting lines this year that I saw last year and thought were impossible.

Also, ride the trees! I didn't like tree riding at first, but it makes you so much better and adds that risk factor to drive you to do things you wouldn't normally do.

But most importantly, have fun doing it!

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#7 Moss

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 11:14 AM

Great comments, and very true.  My last time out I was having issues with looking ahead, and ended up in the weeds a few times.  I know how to carve, but anticipating it, and looking too close, or focusing on something I wanted to avoid was my issue.

 

Also, I'm finding I need to slow down just a bit...>I was pushing too hard at times,  Start your carve at around 30k...Be mindful of foot position too.  further up the running board for a deeper harder carve, and further back usually for a more gradual sweeping carve.  Use your Body weight and momentum to your advantage and you won't tire yourself out,  If your trying to man handle and throw the sled around all the time, you will tire yourself right out.  So using leverage, standing tall, and using your foot position on the running boards will help you.  

 

Best advice there is get out and practice!   More you play, the more confidence you will have, and in no time your will be carving up a storm!!



#8 Bad

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 07:32 AM

Lots of good advise listed there. I don't think I saw anybody mention getting you sled set up for offtrail riding. Which will help initiate and hold a line, sidehill or carve a lot easier.

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They Say getting stuck is half the fun. Which means all my friend are having just as much fun pulling me out of the rubarb all the time.


#9 Mentally TwiSted

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 10:55 AM

if its not already done...disconnect your sway bar and also set your skis to narrow stance. helps for tipping the sled to carve/sidehill.


IMG_2589_zps7ofdtn6p.jpg


#10 Skidoo backcountry

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 11:42 AM

So with the ski-stance set it to 38.4? or what?



#11 Mentally TwiSted

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 12:28 PM

correct. with the backcountry you have the option of 38.4" or 40.1"


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#12 brp_for_life

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Posted 15 February 2015 - 12:07 AM

Dont believe ive seen it on here but riding with more experienced riders really helps with the learning curve. Watching them ride and then trying for similar lines really pushes you to learn. My 2cents :)

#13 Skidoo backcountry

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 01:26 PM

I've watched youtube videos, but maybe it would be better to find and ride with a guy who knows what he's doing in this category. i went snowmobiling this weekend, while going across a lake i tempted "one skiing" or tipping the sled on one side. i could hold it for a pretty good distance. i just need snow before i can go boondocking. 



#14 GreyCountysleder

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Posted 05 March 2015 - 03:10 PM

Watch some of the Schooled videos, def help u learn some new things

#15 Yamadoo500

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Posted 17 March 2015 - 10:49 PM

Look up "Sledshot" on YouTube. They do short tutorial videos...




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