Jump to content

 






Photo

Series versus Parallel wiring of heated grips


This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
3 replies to this topic

#1 hotgrips

hotgrips

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 10 February 2010 - 09:19 AM

<_< The engineering thought varies from one company to the next on parallel vs. series wiring. If you wire a set of heated grips that were designed (to be wired in series) then do not wire them in parallel or you will possibly melt the grips on high, not get enough heat on low, and overheat the resistor on low. You might also damage your system powering the grips because you will be drawing more amps than the system was designed to produce. You may simply get a voltage drop from the overload.

Some engineers intentionally put grips in series so that if one grip fails then neither will work. The reason is because if in parallel, when one grip fails, the result is higher voltage is available at the other grip and it can overheat and make the customer very uncomfortable. It is just a different way of looking at the situation, there is no "set in stone" engineering approach when it comes to heated grips. :dance:

Yamaha heated grips from 1990- 2001 (and quite possibly other years) were designed to be wired in series, not in parallel, by the engineers at Yamaha Motor Corporation in Japan. They fed 18 volts to the grips, and each of the 3 ohm grips would see 9 volts. If you wire them in parallel, they will produce WAY TOO MUCH HEAT even if the power source cold keep up with the demand, and will melt the grips. If you take Yamaha grips and wire them in parallel with a non-Yamaha they will get too hot also, as they were not designed to take 12 volts each. The formula is volts squared divided by ohms equals watts.

When the Hot Grips brand (USA made) model 301 are installed on an ATV incorrectly then the resistor will melt or overheat enough to damage plastic near it when on LOW, and the grips will not get very warm. On HIGH they will put out 400% of their intended heat, so just don't do it. If you have them wired incorrectly you risk damage to the grips, to your sled or ATV. :dance:

To use the electrical formula: volts squared divided by ohms equals watts... The different formulas here will enable you to calculate watts, amps, ohms, volts depending on which known elements you have. Yes, remember that math you learned in high school, use it now. The formulas are at the bottom of this post. :Cheers

The model 101, 102, 301, 302, 401, 501 Hot Grips brand (the ones made in NH, USA) are all designed to operate in "series" only. Each grip is 2.4 ohms which at 12 volts will produce 15 watts of heat on HIGH. If you wire them in "parallel" with 12 volts going to EACH grip, then the wattage multiplies x 4 (400%) which means the grips will try to put out 60 watts each if the 12 volts can be sustained at that high demand. If you wire them to a source that can maintain the 12 volts then the grips will melt in a few minutes. The black lead wires were not intended to carry the high amps of parallel wiring and will overheat, risking damage to other sled or ATV wiring. :)

Their model 123 has been designed from the start to work only on 12 volts, and the low and high heating circuits are both molded inside each grip, so no voltage dropping resistor is used in low heat. If you wire a resistor in the circuit with a model 123 they will not function correctly.

The reason Ski-Doo heated devices are failing is because they are made with the cheapest method of manufacturing grip heat...a printed resistance circuit. Printed resistance circuits will always have a single spot on them that is the thinnest, which acts eventually like a fuse and will simply burn out at that spot. That is why you see a burn-hole in many of the Ski-Doo failed heaters. The Hot Grips brand (NH-USA) are built with electrical resistance wires that were designed to be used in electric furnaces like ceramic kilns, and they were originally meant to get red hot for thousands of hours in those kilns. The wire simply cannot fail in a heated grip application, because their heating potential is being seriously under utilized. The grip's plastic and rubber materials will reach their flow-melting point long long before the wire can reach a point where it cannot take the heat. That is why you will never hear of a Hot Grips brand ( NH-USA) "burning out" or failing, because they can't. The only thing you can do wrong with them is to wire them incorrectly, or not install them with epoxy. If you don't secure them with epoxy, when they heat up they can expand enough to get loose on the bars, and rotating grips will eventually result in failed lead wires or worse, you could lose a grip while riding and crash into a tree. :zzz
Ohm__s_Law_watch__18kb.jpg ohms_law1.gif

#2 spikedbat

spikedbat

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 687 posts

Posted 18 January 2011 - 11:16 AM

Hey,

Does anybody have any feedback or reviews on these grips? Do the 123 plug or wire directly right into the ski doo harness of a REV? Do I soldier?
Help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

#3 lars440

lars440

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 798 posts

Posted 19 January 2011 - 07:23 PM

Hey,

Does anybody have any feedback or reviews on these grips? Do the 123 plug or wire directly right into the ski doo harness of a REV? Do I soldier?
Help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks



no plug and play, needs to be soldiered

#4 forestcity

forestcity

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 211 posts

Posted 19 January 2011 - 11:05 PM

I just installed the Hot Grips 123 as my stock left one had a hole burnt in it and quit working. It feels as though they take a little longer to heat up than the stockers, but overall they are as warm or warmer than the stockers. Take a look at these two sites below, they explain the install quite thoroughly.

https://www.hotgrips...s vs. Hot Grips

http://www.dootalk.c...howtopic=417320

I used Devcon High Strength Plastic Steel Epoxy, it dries black in color. I also put some expanding insulating foam in the handlebars, not sure if it helps, but it was worth a shot. Just a couple hints on the install. I followed the directions that came with the Grips. They said they test them at the factory before they leave, but I also tested them with a battery charger per the instructions just to be sure they heated up. I put the charger on for about a minute so as not to ruin them as they don't have a heat sink when not attached to the bars. I wanted to be sure they worked before I put them on as once that epoxy sets up, the grips aren't going anywhere. As such make sure you get them where you want, you have roughly 30 minutes once epoxy is applied before they start setting up. I soldered all 6 wires and then heat shrinked them for a real clean install.

Summer Ride
03 Sea-Doo RX DI